Britain's Biggest Warship - 3 Part TV Series

I watched episode 2 last night. It's alright but in my opinion the political correctness of these types of programmes ruin it. These programmes seem to focus on a token BAME or they get a pretty girl out for footage of steering the ship or stood in the air traffic control tower.
Secondly these programmes seem heavily sensored. I bet the guys who speak their minds, say it as it is and have a backbone are kept well away from the camera. I don't know if PAYD contractors provide the catering supplies and dictate the menus on ships, but at my unit PAYD is utter dog shite and not fit for purpose because healthy food would cut into the profit margin of the civvy shareholders.
But it doesn't surprise me that inconvenient truths like PAYD
, funding, the spiralling costs of F35, retention and manning levels are not talked about in front of the camera. Instead they film the ships "yes man" to paint a rosy picture
Because Sodexho are queueing up to bid for at sea catering billets with wholeship responsibilties on top. FFS their shareholders really would have something to complain about if they got involved in something that mental.

Beyond the CanMan and CanAss, and the Dhobey wallahs, everyone on a RN warship is serving AF. I did put sailor/marine, but then this one'll have crabs on it too and someone would have pointed it out.... Probably a couple of pongoes somewhere too.....
 
The one slightly sour note for me, was the bigging up of the two helicopters landing on the deck, given the well known controversy of the carriers lack of fixed wing air power. When is the carrier expected to have fast jets delivered and then taking off?
Autumn this year.

Why "sour"? "Aircraft carrier sees first landing of aircraft" seems a pretty reasonable thing for the ship's company to be happy about - to be honest the alternative, of "nearly 1000 sailors remain stoney faced as helicopter arrives because it doesn't have wings and therefore isn't the *proper* first aircraft" strikes me as borderline ludicrous.

Outside the echo-chamber of "look no jets" is another echo-chamber of people getting on with their jobs and having fun. Guess which echo chamber the BBC is filming? MOD DPR(N) is not making this series, and nor is it giving the BBC the lines to take. Guess the ship's company have dropped a bollock by looking pleased and not thinking how this is going to come over on Wings Over Scotland.

I agree with the rest of your post.
 
I did notice a ventriloquists dummy appear a couple of times in the welfare officers cabin

I presume that means that Wilf will be making a comeback?

"Hello Winkers"
 
Merchant ships don't have big crews like the RN. The Maersk Honam had a crew of 27. It's literally a matter of all hands to the pumps if anything kicks off.
No, I get that - my friend was pointing out that the less-experienced crew members, as in the RN, would be given jobs as and when, under supervision (i.e. directing hoses from the bridge wings...). However, the fact that such a group had become the only casualties was raising eyebrows as "unexpected".
 
Great programme and big thumbs up to the RN.
A question for our Andrew colleagues please.
Interesting to see how many civilian contractors accompanied the ship on its sea trials, including construction workers still completing work on the ship.
Given everyone in the ships company has other duties when it comes to daily routine and in particular, in emergencies (fire fighting, first aid etc), what level of basic training is given to the contractors before they set sail and are they told to stay out of the way during emergency drills or are they expected to muck in/contribute?
Just curious.

It was fairly common for new/refitted warships to sail on operational sorties with civvie workmen on board during WW2. The most famous example being the Vickers-Armstrong men on board HMS Prince of Wales at the Battle of the Denmark Strait. IIRC once source even indicates that these men were in the various compartments of the turret columns during the battle, as it was the main armament that they were commissioning (A1 gun and Y turret broke down during the battle).

I've often wondered whether they got a medal when they got home, or if they went to the Union to complain about the breach of their job demarcation and obligations ....
 
Autumn this year.

Why "sour"? "Aircraft carrier sees first landing of aircraft" seems a pretty reasonable thing for the ship's company to be happy about - to be honest the alternative, of "nearly 1000 sailors remain stoney faced as helicopter arrives because it doesn't have wings and therefore isn't the *proper* first aircraft" strikes me as borderline ludicrous.

Outside the echo-chamber of "look no jets" is another echo-chamber of people getting on with their jobs and having fun. Guess which echo chamber the BBC is filming? MOD DPR(N) is not making this series, and nor is it giving the BBC the lines to take. Guess the ship's company have dropped a bollock by looking pleased and not thinking how this is going to come over on Wings Over Scotland.

I agree with the rest of your post.
Fair cop. Poor wording on my part. I didn't wish to make it negative, as I'm really enjoying the series, so the use of the word sour was definitely inappropriate!
 
No, I get that - my friend was pointing out that the less-experienced crew members, as in the RN, would be given jobs as and when, under supervision (i.e. directing hoses from the bridge wings...). However, the fact that such a group had become the only casualties was raising eyebrows as "unexpected".
not true - I've done a for-real bit of firefighting at sea as an Officer Cadet, and then as a baby SLt. Beyond the SSEP with their pre-allocated jobs, fearnought suits were handed out on an equal opportunities, first-come first-served basis.

In all honesty, doing something under supervision is not how it went. With the possible (I'd hope) exception of BA controller (and even then we'd be trained to do it), most FRPP work on the basis that everyone is fair game for anything. There isn't time to run the rule over the manpower and think "well A can do xyz, but B can only do vwx."
 
I was pleasantly surprised to realise it wasn't the usual "Received Pronunciation" English accent, that provided the commentary . . . .

(Make no mistake, I do like the usual Radio 4 "Received English" accent, but a change is always nice).

Even more pleased when the final credits confirmed the dulcet voice belonged to the lovely Caroline Catz . . .

1524486511286.jpg
1524486719996.jpg


Caroline Catz - Wikipedia

Not unknown to a "uniform" herself, she was first introduced to a lot of us - a long time ago - in "All Quiet on the Preston Front". (She is on the left!).

1524486571046.jpg


All Quiet on the Preston Front - Wikipedia
 
Have to say some of the old sweats featured in the first two episodes didn't strike me as 'yes men', more like mature, experienced individuals who would have no qualms telling it like it is, if the occasion needed it.
The one slightly sour note for me, was the bigging up of the two helicopters landing on the deck, given the well known controversy of the carriers lack of fixed wing air power. When is the carrier expected to have fast jets delivered and then taking off?
"The programme is on schedule to achieve Initial Operating Capability from land next year with Initial Operating Capability Carrier Strike in 2020. "

UK takes Delivery of final F-35B Lightning of this year | Royal Navy refers.
 
I was pleasantly surprised to realise it wasn't the usual "Received Pronunciation" English accent, that provided the commentary . . . .

(Make no mistake, I do like the usual Radio 4 "Received English" accent, but a change is always nice).

Even more pleased when the final credits confirmed the dulcet voice belonged to the lovely Caroline Catz . . .

View attachment 331981 View attachment 331983

Caroline Catz - Wikipedia

Not unknown to a "uniform" herself, she was first introduced to a lot of us - a long time ago - in "All Quiet on the Preston Front". (She is on the left!).

View attachment 331982

All Quiet on the Preston Front - Wikipedia
Nice spot - I really like her. Doc Martin is a fool! :smile:
 
I think the point was that normally there would be a Multi Faith area where anyone could go...rather than a wee room that had been turned into a prayer room.
The original intention was for a ‘chapel’ on 7 Deck aft. I don’t know if it made it through the re-design and build phases ( I’ll defer to @meerkatz on that ) so it’s possible that it’s fitted for but not with God.
 
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Again I thought this was a good episode, I wonder if the female PO with the black eye will be believed when she says she walked into a door ! =)
 
I watched episode 2 last night. It's alright but in my opinion the political correctness of these types of programmes ruin it. These programmes seem to focus on a token BAME or they get a pretty girl out for footage of steering the ship or stood in the air traffic control tower.
Secondly these programmes seem heavily sensored. I bet the guys who speak their minds, say it as it is and have a backbone are kept well away from the camera. I don't know if PAYD contractors provide the catering supplies and dictate the menus on ships, but at my unit PAYD is utter dog shite and not fit for purpose because healthy food would cut into the profit margin of the civvy shareholders.
But it doesn't surprise me that inconvenient truths like PAYD, funding, the spiralling costs of F35, retention and manning levels are not talked about in front of the camera. Instead they film the ships "yes man" to paint a rosy picture
Read your post and thought you were a sock but you have been around since 2009 but only 12 posts. What is this political correctness that you speak of ?.
 
It was fairly common for new/refitted warships to sail on operational sorties with civvie workmen on board during WW2. The most famous example being the Vickers-Armstrong men on board HMS Prince of Wales at the Battle of the Denmark Strait. IIRC once source even indicates that these men were in the various compartments of the turret columns during the battle, as it was the main armament that they were commissioning (A1 gun and Y turret broke down during the battle).
In the late 90s I worked for a Project Manager who (as a young engineer) had sailed south with the Task Force in 1982; he'd been providing support to the Blue Fox radar fitted in the SHAR. They got a big thank-you from Sharkey Ward in his book.

Allegedly (although I didn't hear this from him) the Ferranti guys were told they'd be getting off at Ascension; but they stayed on HMS Hermes and HMS Invincible for the duration...

There was also a Marconi engineer on HMS Brilliant (David Breen MBE), trying to polish up Sea Wolf (still experimental at the time). There was a mid-campaign software update to cope with target prioritisation, not to mention repairing battle damage; he definitely had skin in the game... (as in "was in the Ops Rm when a shell passed between him and the Chief GI"). This article suggests that there were other Marconi engineers on HMS Andromeda.
 
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jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
Merchant ships don't have big crews like the RN. The Maersk Honam had a crew of 27. It's literally a matter of all hands to the pumps if anything kicks off.
Also, there's a totally different mindset: a RNR friend who was a merchant mariner (master of a cable ship) in his day job, was taken aback by the notion of "making re-entry to a compartment" in a fire; if a fire's that bad on his ship that they've closed the hatch on it, then he's taking the most valuable items (the crew of technicians who know the black magic involved in re-splicing a broken fibre optic cable) and getting in the lifeboats, none of this "re-entry" business.
 

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