Brief Thoughts On Maps

My final post here for today as I could bang on for ages about how they create contours, historic contaminated land and County map series projections. Without going through all 70 odd pages, has anyone mentioned the arrows on roads nr hills on old OS maps and what they signify?

I know ..... from studying " O " Level Geography in the 50's ... question ... were Bench Marks with associated height above mean sea level marked on the old 2 !/2 " to the mile OS Maps ? .... I have the OS Maps App and cannot see any thee .
 

RNR Stoker

Old-Salt
It would have been OS at the time though I think?
Surveyors would always be updating the Object Name Books as time goes by. Names and usage changes so they are revised as often as the map changes.
The information on Ireland I have is brief but I will put it below.
 

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RNR Stoker

Old-Salt
I know ..... from studying " O " Level Geography in the 50's ... question ... were Bench Marks with associated height above mean sea level marked on the old 2 !/2 " to the mile OS Maps ? .... I have the OS Maps App and cannot see any thee .
Yes benchmarks were probably outdated and didn't survive digitisation into the mastermap database. They all relative to the datum established by measuring the tides down at Newlyn 100 years ago to get a mean sea level.
 
Yes benchmarks were probably outdated and didn't survive digitisation into the mastermap database. They all relative to the datum established by measuring the tides down at Newlyn 100 years ago to get a mean sea level.

Ref Chevrons

one in seven for a single chevron
one in five for a double

... or when I was a lad on a fixed wheel cycle .... single chevron rideable ... double chevron get off and push
 
Without going through all 70 odd pages, has anyone mentioned the arrows on roads nr hills on old OS maps and what they signify?
Depiction of significant slopes on roads and tracks didn’t come into Ordnance Survey mapping until the Popular Edition series, which was published just after WW1. This was the first series to be produced in full colour and it was aimed at the mass market and more specifically at motorists. Those early motorists needed to know whether their old boneshaker would make it from A to B and the colours of road depiction indicated the condition of the road surface.

Slopes greater than 1 in 7 were depicted with an arrowhead
Slope1.jpg


The New Popular Edition series was published after WW2 and continued to depict the road condition. An additional symbol (double arrowhead) for steep gradients over 1 in 5 was included.
Slope2.jpg
 
Yep and as I mentioned upthread were originally used to inform how many horses were needed to pull a cannon up. Quite where I got this info from is lost in memory and might well be not 100% accurate
I don't think there was such a depiction for cannon/horses ratio. The OS Old Series mapping, published from 1805-1874, used abbreviations and symbology but their usage, depiction and meaning evolved over the 70 years it took to complete the project. The Old Series had no legend and there's no record of steep gradients being mapped with symbols.

The Revised New Series mapping, published 1897-1904 included a legend but there was no mention of arrows to denote steep gradient of roads/tracks.
 

RNR Stoker

Old-Salt
I don't think there was such a depiction for cannon/horses ratio. The OS Old Series mapping, published from 1805-1874, used abbreviations and symbology but their usage, depiction and meaning evolved over the 70 years it took to complete the project. The Old Series had no legend and there's no record of steep gradients being mapped with symbols.

The Revised New Series mapping, published 1897-1904 included a legend but there was no mention of arrows to denote steep gradient of roads/tracks.
Thanks. I will did a little further by looking at the 1801 map of Kent and asking round some retired colleagues.
 
Thanks. I will did a little further by looking at the 1801 map of Kent and asking round some retired colleagues.
There's an 1801 map of Kent on the link below where you can zoom onto panel details, but that was an individual map sheet rather than part of an OS map series and again it didn't have a legend.
MAPCO Map And Plan Collection Online : New & Accurate Survey Of Kent by William Mudge 1801
As for whether there were chevrons marked on some sort of bespoke early 'terrain analysis' military maps for moving cannons about with horse teams, I would have thought that the cost of commissioning a map and the length of time it would take to produce would discount that from happening. ...and whether more horses are needed to get up a slope would depend on the size of artillery piece
 
There's an 1801 map of Kent on the link below where you can zoom onto panel details, but that was an individual map sheet rather than part of an OS map series and again it didn't have a legend.
MAPCO Map And Plan Collection Online : New & Accurate Survey Of Kent by William Mudge 1801
As for whether there were chevrons marked on some sort of bespoke early 'terrain analysis' military maps for moving cannons about with horse teams, I would have thought that the cost of commissioning a map and the length of time it would take to produce would discount that from happening. ...and whether more horses are needed to get up a slope would depend on the size of artillery piece
Read up on French revolutions/Napoleon/Boulogne camp standing army training for 2 years.

And Pitt in Government at the time.
 
I dip into Brilliant Maps every so often. It never fails to amaze me how people manage to map the weirdest phenomena (like which countries flush bog paper!) and how virtually anything has a spatial dimension which maps can provide data and explanations for (medical geography being a prime example).


There is a map referenced in the latest update which intrigued me.

1639487250047.png


Boffins stuck a GPS transmitter on a female Arctic Fox and tracked the route it took when it walked from Norway to eastern Canada. She walked 3,500km in 76 days, maxing out at 155km/day*. Across the Arctic.

SAS, SEALS, Spetnaz - eat your hearts out. A little girly fox trashed you in the tabbing/yomping stakes in one of the shittiest places on the planet.

Full research paper here:




* The actual daily average was 46km (which is not bad in itself). She obviously had a few days rest but did 155 km/day on a good day.
 
I dip into Brilliant Maps every so often. It never fails to amaze me how people manage to map the weirdest phenomena (like which countries flush bog paper!) and how virtually anything has a spatial dimension which maps can provide data and explanations for (medical geography being a prime example).


There is a map referenced in the latest update which intrigued me.

View attachment 622866

Boffins stuck a GPS transmitter on a female Arctic Fox and tracked the route it took when it walked from Norway to eastern Canada. She walked 3,500km in 76 days, maxing out at 155km/day*. Across the Arctic.

SAS, SEALS, Spetnaz - eat your hearts out. A little girly fox trashed you in the tabbing/yomping stakes in one of the shittiest places on the planet.

Full research paper here:




* The actual daily average was 46km (which is not bad in itself). She obviously had a few days rest but did 155 km/day on a good day.
Looks like an interesting site. The map on its home page depicts Europe's population growth by country between 1960 and 2020. The French increase of 45% is staggering. There must have been masses of immigration or the French have been at it like rabbits!
 
I know ..... from studying " O " Level Geography in the 50's ... question ... were Bench Marks with associated height above mean sea level marked on the old 2 !/2 " to the mile OS Maps ? .... I have the OS Maps App and cannot see any thee .

I don’t think bench marks were featured below six-inch
 
I dip into Brilliant Maps every so often. It never fails to amaze me how people manage to map the weirdest phenomena (like which countries flush bog paper!) and how virtually anything has a spatial dimension which maps can provide data and explanations for (medical geography being a prime example).


There is a map referenced in the latest update which intrigued me.

View attachment 622866

Boffins stuck a GPS transmitter on a female Arctic Fox and tracked the route it took when it walked from Norway to eastern Canada. She walked 3,500km in 76 days, maxing out at 155km/day*. Across the Arctic.

SAS, SEALS, Spetnaz - eat your hearts out. A little girly fox trashed you in the tabbing/yomping stakes in one of the shittiest places on the planet.

Full research paper here:




* The actual daily average was 46km (which is not bad in itself). She obviously had a few days rest but did 155 km/day on a good day.

Who's a good girl?
 

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