Brief Thoughts On Maps

I was looking something up in Mike Parker’s Map Addict and glanced at the intro.

“Recently, some new neighbours moved in. They’d trekked halfway across the country, from the fringes of Manchester to their new life in our small village in the mountains of mid Wales. One night, I was showing them a good local walk, using my well-worn Ordnance Survey Explorer Map (OL23 Cadair Idris & Llyn Tegid, for aficionados). ‘Oh, yes,’ one of them mused. ‘That reminds me, I must get a map of the area.’​
I swear the world stood still. What I wanted to say was, ‘You mean, you moved here from over a hundred miles away without buying a map first? Without taking it out on a nightly basis, stroking its contours, gently murmuring the unfamiliar names, idly following with your finger footpaths and streams, back lanes and bridleways, feeling faintly, randomly intimidated by the angular blocks of plantation forestry and sumps of squelchy moorland, excited by the wide beaches, towering peaks, limpid lakes and nestled market towns, all spread beguilingly across the paper? Without enjoying the thrill of anticipation of your impending move to a whole new world? Without checking out that whole new world, as captured by the gods of the Ordnance Survey? Are you mad? What in bejesus’ name is the matter with you?​
What I actually said was, ‘Oh, right. They sell them in the bookshop in town.’​
If my cowardly internalised rant had you mentally nodding in agreement; if you like to check the map before a trip to B&Q; if you can sit and read a good map like others read Hello! or Heat, then this book is for you.​
You are a fellow-mappie, we are of one flesh.”​

I’m with Parker and the “gods of the Ordnance Survey”.

I moved from Hampshire to West Yorkshire a year ago. Before I moved oop I bought three OS maps (I’m on the sodding edge of all of them), the ring bound 2.5” street map, the smaller pocket version, several books on local walks, a book on the local canals, Googled disused railway lines, scanned the NLS side by side maps for circular walks of historic interest, checked the Dibble local crime map and probably a few other things.

Maybe I’m nuts but I can’t imagine moving to a place and not knowing the area I’m moving to.

Now, if only I could remember where I put them and what my address is.
 
The London Underground Map by Harry Beck and its countless derivatives have had a good outing in this thread but I just found this one.

Each of the stations is listed as an anagram of its name and not always a polite one. Thus we get Browny Helmet, Queer Spank and Primo Urinals, amongst others.

5BD8EBDD-239B-426E-82C7-F935DDE4E49E.gif

(It is a high quality image and should enlarge onscreen).

I think LU took a dim view of it and issued a Swelled Injunction.

Despite having used the Underground for over fifty years and passed through nearly every station in that time I found it really difficult to work out some of the anagrams.
 
Just a heads up for those that are interested.. "Timeshift: A Very British Map:The Ordnance Survey Story" is being shown again on BBC4 on Sunday night at midnight...
The last time they broadcast it there was much harrumphing here about people saying ”ordinance”.

A good programme though.
I watched it yesterday and found it fascinating. By coincidence, the maps I am working on at the moment for the BL are the ones mentioned in the programme as the first done; the south coast & Kent.
I have just finished the earliest that I've done so far, 1789, of Chilham, Kent, done by George Pink. Oddly, it's one of the most accurate I've done, and nearly all are stunningly accurate. Some you have to 'pull' into shape slightly, probably due to the condition of the paper they were drawn on and poor storage over the years. This one fell into place. Tracks in the woods are largely still extant and many (big) houses are still there, or rebuilt on the same footing.
"The map is just fantastic, that is really what I think, Oh, by the way, well done, Pink"
Apologies;)

OS Map Chilham 1789
 

wheel

LE
I was looking something up in Mike Parker’s Map Addict and glanced at the intro.

“Recently, some new neighbours moved in. They’d trekked halfway across the country, from the fringes of Manchester to their new life in our small village in the mountains of mid Wales. One night, I was showing them a good local walk, using my well-worn Ordnance Survey Explorer Map (OL23 Cadair Idris & Llyn Tegid, for aficionados). ‘Oh, yes,’ one of them mused. ‘That reminds me, I must get a map of the area.’​
I swear the world stood still. What I wanted to say was, ‘You mean, you moved here from over a hundred miles away without buying a map first? Without taking it out on a nightly basis, stroking its contours, gently murmuring the unfamiliar names, idly following with your finger footpaths and streams, back lanes and bridleways, feeling faintly, randomly intimidated by the angular blocks of plantation forestry and sumps of squelchy moorland, excited by the wide beaches, towering peaks, limpid lakes and nestled market towns, all spread beguilingly across the paper? Without enjoying the thrill of anticipation of your impending move to a whole new world? Without checking out that whole new world, as captured by the gods of the Ordnance Survey? Are you mad? What in bejesus’ name is the matter with you?​
What I actually said was, ‘Oh, right. They sell them in the bookshop in town.’​
If my cowardly internalised rant had you mentally nodding in agreement; if you like to check the map before a trip to B&Q; if you can sit and read a good map like others read Hello! or Heat, then this book is for you.​
You are a fellow-mappie, we are of one flesh.”​

I’m with Parker and the “gods of the Ordnance Survey”.

I moved from Hampshire to West Yorkshire a year ago. Before I moved oop I bought three OS maps (I’m on the sodding edge of all of them), the ring bound 2.5” street map, the smaller pocket version, several books on local walks, a book on the local canals, Googled disused railway lines, scanned the NLS side by side maps for circular walks of historic interest, checked the Dibble local crime map and probably a few other things.

Maybe I’m nuts but I can’t imagine moving to a place and not knowing the area I’m moving to.

Now, if only I could remember where I put them and what my address is.
You can order an OS with any grid ref of your choosing in the center of the map. Also add your own title and picture. Cheaper and easier to use than three maps.
 
You can order an OS with any grid ref of your choosing in the center of the map. Also add your own title and picture. Cheaper and easier to use than three maps.
Quite handy when you are planning walks in the trossachs…although there are other maps out there that are just as good.
 
You can order an OS with any grid ref of your choosing in the center of the map. Also add your own title and picture. Cheaper and easier to use than three maps.
You can indeed.

As pointed out up the thread don’t place your location dead centre on the map as you will always be in the crease/fold.
 

TamH70

MIA
Quite handy when you are planning walks in the trossachs…although there are other maps out there that are just as good.
With reference to the Trossachs, is it possible to start walking up them at one end and carry on straight through to the other end without annoying any landowners unnecessarily?
 
With reference to the Trossachs, is it possible to start walking up them at one end and carry on straight through to the other end without annoying any landowners unnecessarily?
Have a look here:
 
With reference to the Trossachs, is it possible to start walking up them at one end and carry on straight through to the other end without annoying any landowners unnecessarily?
The only real thorn was the owner of Duchray castle who used to be a penis prior to jumping on the holiday lodge market
 
With reference to the Trossachs, is it possible to start walking up them at one end and carry on straight through to the other end without annoying any landowners unnecessarily?
You shouldn’t really annoy too many landowners.

The Land Reform (Scotland) Act of 2003 gives you virtually unfettered access to land. Obviously you need to treat landowners with courtesy and respect but in my experience the average hiker/rambler tends not to be the littering, noisy, disruptive inner city chav type.

It would be nice if England and Wales caught up with Scotland. The Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act, 2000, opened up huge swathes of land but nothing like the Scottish version.
 
You shouldn’t really annoy too many landowners.

The Land Reform (Scotland) Act of 2003 gives you virtually unfettered access to land. Obviously you need to treat landowners with courtesy and respect but in my experience the average hiker/rambler tends not to be the littering, noisy, disruptive inner city chav type.

It would be nice if England and Wales caught up with Scotland. The Countryside and Rights of Way (CRoW) Act, 2000, opened up huge swathes of land but nothing like the Scottish version.
For the last twenty years the Loch Lomond national park fought a tidy up battle against the camping neds. Polis were involved
to the point designated camp sites were advertised as the only place to stay. It all comes down to funding and the rise of a national park quango that sussed our real quick that they could influence what could be built inside their boundaries

Anyhow back to maps, one of the good points of getting lost in QE Forrest park is the knowledge the midges will eat you alive no matter how good your map is
 

Robme

On ROPS
On ROPs
For the last twenty years the Loch Lomond national park fought a tidy up battle against the camping neds. Polis were involved
to the point designated camp sites were advertised as the only place to stay. It all comes down to funding and the rise of a national park quango that sussed our real quick that they could influence what could be built inside their boundaries

Anyhow back to maps, one of the good points of getting lost in QE Forrest park is the knowledge the midges will eat you alive no matter how good your map is
Back in the day, I would camp out with a bivvy bag and sleeping bag, also took the dog. We did this for 5 seasons all over the U.K. until my knees gave up. Never did get challenged nor ‘shoo‘d on’, mind you midges were a barsteward on occasion, and I didn’t drop all manner of litter.
 
For the last twenty years the Loch Lomond national park fought a tidy up battle against the camping neds. Polis were involved
to the point designated camp sites were advertised as the only place to stay. It all comes down to funding and the rise of a national park quango that sussed our real quick that they could influence what could be built inside their boundaries

Anyhow back to maps, one of the good points of getting lost in QE Forrest park is the knowledge the midges will eat you alive no matter how good your map is
Didn’t the Scottish act give free rein to responsible wild camping?

I suppose when you say “neds” you mean the chav contingent though.

Although I am generally a bit on the liberal side, when I see the mess people leave on the countryside my hang ‘em high/birch them tendencies come out.
 
naughty cartographers...


 
About five years ago I had to go to the helicopter school at RNAS Culdrose.

I used to use Multimap a lot so opened it up and bunged in the start/finish locations.

I was a bit surprised at the results:

Map 1

View attachment 171559

Map 2

View attachment 171560

Map 3

View attachment 171561

Map 4


View attachment 171562
Oddly enough the written instructions on the left were correct.

I think there might have been a slight glitch in the mapping software.
Bad form to quote yourself but I thought I would update this post from years ago.

I have never been able to work out how a journey from Windsor to RNAS Culdrose put me in the ocean somewhere in the Gulf of Guinea (as shown in the final map above). I assumed it was just a software glitch.

Just been reading a book on maths and in the bit on database errors the bloke talks about Null Island. This is a non-existent island located at co-ordinates 0,0 (i.e the intersection of zero degrees lat/long). An input error will bring this up.

Background:

Null Island is a small but proud island nation off the west coast of Africa. It’s located about 600 kilometres south of Ghana, and you can find it by putting its latitude and longitude into any mapping software of your choice: 0,0. Fun fact: its coordinates look like the facial expression of anyone deported there. For, you see, outside of databases, Null Island does not exist. It really does live up to its slogan: ‘Like No Place on Earth!’
Looking at the inputs I didn't enter the start/end locations incorrectly* but Multimap wrongly interpreted them.

It has turned into a bit of a standing joke: Null Island - Wikipedia

*Edit: Thinking about it I probably entered the destination in the "Via" field and left the destination field blank thus taking me to 0,0. via where I wanted to go.

Edit 2: A good example of Null Island can be seen in the hallowed grounds of this noble institution. Based on their site profiles most posters indicate they come from NULL.
 
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Thanks to Diamond Geezer ( diamond geezer ) I've just discovered the 'London Topographical Society' ( Homepage - London Topographical Society ). It looks quite interesting in its own right and they've now posted all their Newsletters, in digital format, on their website. Scroll down the home page to 'Digital Newsletter Project Completed'. The lockdown will give me plenty of time to browse through them!
 

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