Brief Thoughts On Maps

Bmap y all accounts, digitization for auntonomous vehicles is facing some challenges, except for new towns like Milton Keynes. Having your pizza delivered cold by a robot icebox is one thing, letting your car drive itself whilst avoiding lamp posts and telegraph posts with distinct leans is quite another. There's going to be tragedies, like any developing tech.

I'd rather get home in the icebox after a few pints.

Who picks it up when some git kicks it over?
 
Found this wee cracker when clearing through Dads bits and pieces. Its taken out of the Royal Engineer Ops in the South Atlantic report and its immediate aftermath.
Always the case, the bit you want seems to always be on the join!
 

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You can have a funny for that but in real life it’s no joking matter.

Where I live is right on the edge/corner of three OS maps. I have never lived anywhere near the centre of any OS map. I think it’s personal.

I do believe you can buy an OS map centred on your location (I may have posted this up the thread). IIRC it was about £24. It might be an older map though and intended as a gift (framed or not).

If out walking I often print out the side-by-side maps from the NLS website (loads of mentions up the thread). I use the 1900 and current OS maps so I can see what used to be where I walk - railways, mines and factories mostly. All gone.
 

load_fin

War Hero
I do believe you can buy an OS map centred on your location (I may have posted this up the thread). IIRC it was about £24. It might be an older map though and intended as a gift (framed or not).
Top tip; if you buy one, dont put your house in the exact centre - it will be on a fold line and be obscured. I know this from experience.

I also got one for my father. Turned out to be be about 60% sea. Should have thought a little more about where he lives.
 
Listened to a very interesting program this morning on radio 4, all about the pros and cons of sat-navs versus maps. It is called "What Has Sat-Nav Done to Our Brains?". It seems that reading maps is very good for one's hippocampus! It is well worth a listen.
Thanks for the linky will listen to it later .
 

MortonSlumber

Old-Salt
Maps still good even in these SatNav days.

And if a trucker do not use a car sat nav as they do not list low bridges.
In fact work bans sat navs and gives all drivers road maps or traffic office guides drivers in last few miles.

Bridge strikes are deemed incompatible with having an HGV licence these days!
 
For anyone familiar with Kabul in recent times (not me!), I have found a map in the British Library collection of it during the 2nd Anglo-Afghan war (the author, James Grant, 62nd Regiment, speaks of it as the 3rd in his book British Battles On Land And Sea, Vol 4 (or 5, the U.S. library seems confused too!) publ 1894).

Kabul c1878

Swapping to Google Earth view is more interesting.

Linky to book
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I still use and teach land navigation using 1:50000 & 1:25000 scale OS maps, a protractor, pencil and compass. I have to fight off 'I'll just use google maps on my phone' all the time......

Edited to add, I throw in disecting the midday sun, the Polar Star and moss on trees to truly blow their minds.
 
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I still use and teach land navigation using 1:50000 & 1:25000 scale OS maps, a protractor, pencil and compass. I have to fight off 'I'll just use google maps on my phone' all the time......
I bet the batteries in your OS maps never run flat, their internet connection doesn’t vanish and their screens never break.
 
If anyone's interested, I spotted some books in W H Smith the other day. First WW, Second WW and D-Day. Author Peter Chassaud, published by The Times newspaper. All are full of interesting maps, a lot in colour. Reduced to £7
 
If out walking I often print out the side-by-side maps from the NLS website (loads of mentions up the thread). I use the 1900 and current OS maps so I can see what used to be where I walk - railways, mines and factories mostly. All gone.
I know it’s considered bad form to quote yourself but I thought an actual example might be of interest.

I often walk on the Calder & Hebble Navigation/River Calder.

3388BDC3-B8C0-499B-ABE4-BF1E21A6E37D.jpeg


It all seems pretty much rural nowadays (which is what makes it a nice walk) but it was long ago and then it wasn’t. It was a hive of heavy industry, smoke and soot. All gone.

1. The mineral railway bridge over the Navigation has gone (as has the railway)
2. The colliery has gone.
3. The railway line has gone.
4. Ditto
5. The station has gone.

Without a map you might assume there was never anything there and it had always been agricultural land.

A lot of the factories/mills still exist but they all seem to be car places now and for some strange reason bed/mattress warehouses (I have never seen so many bed places in my life). The street names often reflect the heritage (Engine Lane, Forge Lane, Industrial Street etc).
 

Zhopa

War Hero
It was a hive of heavy industry, smoke and soot. All gone.
Not to mention the sewage works!

And yet, some of the field boundaries, which could be considerably more ancient, remain unchanged.
 
I still use and teach land navigation using 1:50000 & 1:25000 scale OS maps, a protractor, pencil and compass. I have to fight off 'I'll just use google maps on my phone' all the time......

Edited to add, I throw in disecting the midday sun, the Polar Star and moss on trees to truly blow their minds.
.... all techniques I have actually passed on to my son and he can demonstrate when he occasionally accompanies me on a walk .... in a small way such techniques add to the pleasure of a day walk .

ETA I have a limited knowledge of stars in the Northern Hemisphere ... obviously including the constellation of Ursa Major and its use to find the North Star ... my father taught me in the 1950's at a time when most street lights were switched off at 22.00 and the skies were ink black ... no light pollution ... his self taught knowledge of the stars to me seemed encyclopaedic and acquired as a consequence of deep sea sailing between the 30's and 50's ..
 
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I still use and teach land navigation using 1:50000 & 1:25000 scale OS maps, a protractor, pencil and compass. I have to fight off 'I'll just use google maps on my phone' all the time......

Edited to add, I throw in disecting the midday sun, the Polar Star and moss on trees to truly blow their minds.
I too, am fed up with pointing out the obvious to my younger students.

The General Aviation Safety Council (GASCo), who have the support of those wonderful people at Gatwick, published an article in a flight training journal that traditional navigation for pilots was no longer needed to be taught in this marvellous age of GNSS, (although it is still in the syllabus).

In the event of failure of the system the advise was a call to the emergency frequency for assistance. (Sarcasm on) so much easer than actually using a plan, map and clock.

They forgot to mention to not rely on the satellite system when Sennybridge are playing.

As my old chief would say ...” not very bright and useless for lifting weight”


?.. not sure about the idea to be honest.
 
I too, am fed up with pointing out the obvious to my younger students.

The General Aviation Safety Council (GASCo), who have the support of those wonderful people at Gatwick, published an article in a flight training journal that traditional navigation for pilots was no longer needed to be taught in this marvellous age of GNSS, (although it is still in the syllabus).

In the event of failure of the system the advise was a call to the emergency frequency for assistance. (Sarcasm on) so much easer than actually using a plan, map and clock.

They forgot to mention to not rely on the satellite system when Sennybridge are playing.

As my old chief would say ...” not very bright and useless for lifting weight”


?.. not sure about the idea to be honest.
I have always been a big fan of belt and braces. Modern tech is great but it has a tendency to go tits up. I imagine this would be worse in a shooting war with jamming, GPS degradation/removal etc.

It’s nice to have a fallback technology when the SHTF.

I watched a programme on the new QEII the other day and Cap’n Kyd was teaching his new occifers how to use sextants, astronavigation etc, effectively the “maps” of the seas.

If all else fails then the most electronically sophisticated warship in the world will be navigated in the same way the Cap’n’s predecessor navigated HMS Victory. (I know he has left the ship).
 

Karamoja

Old-Salt
I have always been a big fan of belt and braces. Modern tech is great but it has a tendency to go tits up. I imagine this would be worse in a shooting war with jamming, GPS degradation/removal etc.

It’s nice to have a fallback technology when the SHTF.

I watched a programme on the new QEII the other day and Cap’n Kyd was teaching his new occifers how to use sextants, astronavigation etc, effectively the “maps” of the seas.

If all else fails then the most electronically sophisticated warship in the world will be navigated in the same way the Cap’n’s predecessor navigated HMS Victory. (I know he has left the ship).
I saw that but was surprised that the officers weren't taught that at Dartmouth. Perhaps they couldn't fit in in between all the diversity and indentity lectures.
 
I saw that but was surprised that the officers weren't taught that at Dartmouth. Perhaps they couldn't fit in in between all the diversity and indentity lectures.
I think there was an element of it having been set up for the camera crew on the grounds of it making good TV.

“Ooh Tristan, lets get the pirate captain to show his dashing young blades how to use a 250 year old instrument amongst all this high tech gadgetry and gizmos”.

Would the captain be teaching basic navigation?
 
Maps can be in the strangest places, like parliamentary archives

ive just lodged a claim for some lost rights of way based upon a 1789 map of the new forest

an absolute work of art
Screenshot 2020-01-25 at 12.34.11.png
Screenshot 2020-01-25 at 12.34.49.png
 
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