Brief Thoughts On Maps

HarryBosch

War Hero
Is the title of a poem; one which reminds us that apart from reading them, maps can be used to calm us, torture us, cheer us, make us despair, and seemingly beguile us into thinking 'It's just over the next feature' :mrgreen: .

Brief Thoughts on Maps

"The young lieutenant of a small Hungarian detachment in the Alps
sent a reconnaissance unit out onto the icy wasteland.
It began to snow
immediately,
snowed for two days and the unit
did not return.
The lieutenant suffered:
he had dispatched
his own people to death.

But the third day the unit came back.
Where had they been? How had they made their way?
Yes, they said, we considered ourselves
lost and waited for the end. And then one of us
found a map in his pocket. That calmed us down.
We pitched camp, lasted out the snowstorm and then with the map
we discovered our bearings.
And here we are.

The lieutenant borrowed this remarkable map
and had a good look at it. It was not a map of the Alps
but of the Pyrenees"


Miroslav Holub

Do you have any interesting tales or vignettes about following a map, map reading,etc?

HB
 
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I once created a map of scandinavia... On my mattress.


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lumpy2

Guest
Sorry if I'm diverging from the spirit of the thread, but does anyone else find it worrying that so many people these days have absolutely no experience of maps?

I guess satnavs can get you out of trouble, but how can you not know where you are in relation to other places? or even have the vaguest idea about distances and cardinal points of the compass? And what about the pleasure of route planning around interesting features?

I find this sad and bizarre.
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP
Sorry if I'm diverging from the spirit of the thread, but does anyone else find it worrying that so many people these days have absolutely no experience of maps?

I guess satnavs can get you out of trouble, but how can you not know where you are in relation to other places? or even have the vaguest idea about distances and cardinal points of the compass? And what about the pleasure of route planning around interesting features?

I find this sad and bizarre.
Shifting a little bit away with you.

I can read maps. I can also punch the living daylights out of one of them talky things in the car.

If @jarrod248 hadn't have beaten me to it.
 
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lumpy2

Guest
My Old Man (bless him) swears by SatNavs in the car. But whilst I'm checking the road map and pointing out the BFO sign saying "turn right here" he's still waiting for the disembodied voice to tell him what to do.

Odd. :wtf:
 
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lumpy2

Guest
RE Topo
Hermitage ???
Yep, been there.

But I was brought up with maps and atlases from an early age as, I think, were most of my generation. It just seems sad to me that the pleasures of poring over an atlas, or looking for interesting shit on an OS map seem destined to be forgotten in the near future :(
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP
Blokes can't read maps.

Fact.
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
I went out on a trip to visit 3 sites the other day.
2 oldies and 2 young uns.
The two young uns were amazed we had taken a map and not a Sat Nav.
One of them sat with his phone in case we got lost
No need everywhere found first go.

It's not hard.
 
L

lumpy2

Guest
Don't know if this sounds weird, but most of my travel ambitions are based on looking at maps and seeing the wonderful contours, colours of the different gradients etc.

I still imagine the Andes in shades of brown and purple. Is it just me?
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP
Don't know if this sounds weird, but most of my travel ambitions are based on looking at maps and seeing the wonderful contours, colours of the different gradients etc.

I still imagine the Andes in shades of brown and purple. Is it just me?
I've managed a "Road Trip" around Europe with just a map. It's peasy.
 
Don't know if this sounds weird, but most of my travel ambitions are based on looking at maps and seeing the wonderful contours, colours of the different gradients etc.

I still imagine the Andes in shades of brown and purple. Is it just me?
I bloody do!!

Yes Lumps, its you.
How long at Hermitage exactly? You've contracted some horrible topoical disease.
 

toryboy

Old-Salt
Once walked on bearing across Kinder Scout for 1.2km in thick fog/wind/rain and walked straight onto the trig point I was aiming for. After some more cracking navigation, I came across a lost city bloke with all the gear and no idea, and I let him follow me down to the pub. He didn't stop for a pint thought. Woofter.

True story.
 

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