Brian Clemens OBE

Brian Clemens OBE, writer of the Sunday night TV must-sees The Avengers and The Professionals has died. Here's a picture of Emma Peel from The Avengers in the 60's with which to comemmorate him.
image.jpg

Cheers Brian, you gave a generation of lads something to talk about in school on Monday mornings. RIP.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11340694/Brian-Clemens-obituary.html

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the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
And he kitted all of them out with cool cars.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
Ahh the early days with Leyland cars

IIRC BL missed a bit of a trick with that, basically by either not understanding or not really caring what was required. Like providing replacement cars in different colours, buggering up continuity.
Ford were only too pleased to get involved and have their cars made to look good for an hour every Sunday night.
 
Who else secretly wanted to recreate Doyles' indirect shot from an SLR onto a car rear quarterlight from 2 (?) miles away?

Class.
 
And he kitted all of them out with cool cars.
Yep, that brown Marina was a scorcher. And the Victor. Taking a Commer (?) van round a corner on three wheels - classic stuff. But I'm sure Ford sold a hell of a lot of Capri's on the back of that series.

RIP Mr C - thanks for making a boy have exciting dreams!
 
IIRC BL missed a bit of a trick with that, basically by either not understanding or not really caring what was required. Like providing replacement cars in different colours, buggering up continuity.
Ford were only too pleased to get involved and have their cars made to look good for an hour every Sunday night.
From wiki....

"In the first (1977) series, the cars used were mainly those of British Leyland, including a Rover SD1, a Rover P6, a Princess, a Triumph 2000, a Triumph Dolomite Sprint and a Triumph TR7. The SD1, a turmeric yellow 3500, bore the registration MOO 229R; in The New Avengers John Steed drove an identical-looking car with the number MOC 229P. The producers of The Professionals DVDs have speculated that these may in fact have been one and the same car.
However, reliability problems with the cars and BL requiring them back to give to the motoring press was causing disruption to filming. Midway through the first series, the supplier was then switched to Ford after they offered to provide vehicles for the production crew as well as for on screen use. The first Ford to be prominent was a black 1600 Capri used by another CI5 agent (Tommy MacKay)"

Very canny of Ford to provide cars for the crew
 

auxie

War Hero
IIRC BL missed a bit of a trick with that, basically by either not understanding or not really caring what was required. Like providing replacement cars in different colours, buggering up continuity.
Ford were only too pleased to get involved and have their cars made to look good for an hour every Sunday night.



Yoir not kidding just shows how inept and out of touch their marketing team were what a fantastic oppotunity to put your cars in the hands of the good guys at prime viewing times in front of millions of people , hard to credt really

(However we have to bear in mind these are the people who thought putting a square steering wheel on the then new allegro. was a smart move)
 
Yoir not kidding just shows how inept and out of touch their marketing team were what a fantastic oppotunity to put your cars in the hands of the good guys at prime viewing times in front of millions of people , hard to credt really

(However we have to bear in mind these are the people who thought putting a square steering wheel on the then new allegro. was a smart move)
I think the marketing team would have jumped at the chance, however given the financial circumstances BL was in I expect the bean counters had a strong say in the matter. That plus aforementioned reliability issues.

Don't forget that not everyone liked the Professionals when it first came out, there would have been resistance within BL management to having their cars associated with it. Product placement wasn't the art it is today.
 

auxie

War Hero
I think the marketing team would have jumped at the chance, however given the financial circumstances BL was in I expect the bean counters had a strong say in the matter. That plus aforementioned reliability issues.

Don't forget that not everyone liked the Professionals when it first came out, there would have been resistance within BL management to having their cars associated with it. Product placement wasn't the art it is today.


Fair point , If you didnt like the professionals you deserved a cack brown allegro especially one with square steering wheel


Have to admit my decision in 1981 to buy a 3.0 s was partly influenced by the fact bodie drove one ..didnt doyle have a rs 2000 ?
 
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the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
Doyle drove an RS 2000
BL probably thought they were safe as they sold loads of Mini's off the back of the Italian Job despite refusing to supply any.
Jaguar are reported to have done the same when Bond producers wanted him to drive an E Type.
Jaguar refused and Aston provided BMT216A the first DB5 off the line with the real world registration*

Ford perhaps due to American influences where head and shoulders above anyone when it came to their publicity department.
They understood product placement and soon had their cars pretty much in every top show and many films.
They were clever how they used them also in the Sweeney all the Sweeney drove Ford's, the villans all drove everything else.
Even in carry on cabby they managed to get 22 fit birds showing off Mk 1 clean, new, tidy Cortina's versus Sid James old clapped out British (Austin) Taxis.
Plus the innocent wagon driver about to be beaten up and hijacked or brave drove a Ford Tracnscontinental where as the bad guys drove Bedfords and Leylands.

It also saved Bodie arriving in a Triumph Dolly, driving off in a Marina and arriving back at base in a TR7.

*It (DB5) appeared in an earlier episode of the Saint painted Red before being transferred to Bond.
It was a genuine registraition issued by DVLA.
 
just remembered the sheer un-PC-ness of it all as well - didn't Bodie have his hand down Billy Connolly's missus' top at one point, looking for a grenade? Try doing that on Balamory now and you'll get kicked off the script writing team.

'stards.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
From wiki....

"In the first (1977) series, the cars used were mainly those of British Leyland, including a Rover SD1, a Rover P6, a Princess, a Triumph 2000, a Triumph Dolomite Sprint and a Triumph TR7. The SD1, a turmeric yellow 3500, bore the registration MOO 229R; in The New Avengers John Steed drove an identical-looking car with the number MOC 229P. The producers of The Professionals DVDs have speculated that these may in fact have been one and the same car.
However, reliability problems with the cars and BL requiring them back to give to the motoring press was causing disruption to filming. Midway through the first series, the supplier was then switched to Ford after they offered to provide vehicles for the production crew as well as for on screen use. The first Ford to be prominent was a black 1600 Capri used by another CI5 agent (Tommy MacKay)"

Very canny of Ford to provide cars for the crew

Something similar happened with the making of The Italian Job.

The producers needed Fiat's co-operation not just for vehicles, but because if they wanted to stage a massive traffic jam in Turin they had to have the help of the corporation that owned the city. Fiat were highly co-operative, gave the producers and director everything they asked for, no problems. They did once ask if the getaway cars could be changed to their models, but didn't press the issue when they were told 'No, we need them to be Minis'.

British Motor Corporation, however, charged them for the Minis required for filming, and initially wondered what was the point of getting involved.

The story of the UK car industry is more or less reflected by both of these tales.

Anyway, on topic, The Professionals still gets its repeats on ITV4, and once you get past the wing collars, Doyle's perm, and occasionally odd choices for guest actors (David Suchet as a mercenary? Really?), it's still worth watching. In the same way as the British car industry went belly-up, our ability to make popular TV shows beyond costume drama and soaps has gone right down the shitter.
 

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