Brexit - The Final

I'm trying to watch the Dr Strange movie on ITV plus 1 at the moment and even that is making more sense than your figmentations.
One of Cabbagepatches weaker performances, the yank accent seems to take gravitas from normally tip top actor.

What are your thoughts?
 
BTW, I wonder if any Remainers, indeed anyone, can let me know how much new money has been spent in the UK since 2016?, considering we are still paying full whack to Brussels while they continue to make life as hard as possible for us.
Just a 30s google away, if you really wanted to loook...

The UK's EU membership fee

In 2017 the UK government paid £13 billion to the EU budget, and EU spending on the UK was forecast to be £4 billion.

The UK gets money back
The government then gets some of that money back, mainly through payments to farmers and for poorer areas of the country such as Wales and Cornwall.

In 2017, the UK's ‘public sector receipts’ are estimated to be £4 billion.

So overall we paid in £8.9 billion more than we got back.

The Treasury figures note payments the EU makes directly to the private sector, such as research grants. In 2015, these were worth an estimated £1.5 billion, so including them could reduce our net contribution further still.

The money we get back will be spent on things the government may or may not choose to fund upon leaving the EU. It’s not enough to look at the net contribution in isolation because what we get back isn’t fully under our control.




1555775086387.png
 
Just a 30s google away, if you really wanted to loook...

The UK's EU membership fee

In 2017 the UK government paid £13 billion to the EU budget, and EU spending on the UK was forecast to be £4 billion.

The UK gets money back
The government then gets some of that money back, mainly through payments to farmers and for poorer areas of the country such as Wales and Cornwall.

In 2017, the UK's ‘public sector receipts’ are estimated to be £4 billion.

So overall we paid in £8.9 billion more than we got back.

The Treasury figures note payments the EU makes directly to the private sector, such as research grants. In 2015, these were worth an estimated £1.5 billion, so including them could reduce our net contribution further still.

The money we get back will be spent on things the government may or may not choose to fund upon leaving the EU. It’s not enough to look at the net contribution in isolation because what we get back isn’t fully under our control.



View attachment 388838
Furthermore @Auld-Yin . This took another 30s...

UK funding from the EU - Commons Library briefing - UK Parliament

Public and private sector organisations in the UK receive funding from the EU through various channels – the UK received a total of €6.3 billion (about £5.5 billion) in 2017. The majority of EU funding is administered in partnership with national and regional authorities in Member States, though a share of it is directly administered by the European Commission.

The two most significant funding channels for the UK are the European Structural and Investment (ESI) funds and the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund. For the current funding period (2014-20), the UK has been allocated €17.2 billion and €22.5 billion through these funds respectively.

The ESI Funds are the EU’s instrument for reducing disparities in the level of development of its various regions and for helping less developed regions to catch up. The bulk of UK funding via this channel comes through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), which has been allocated €5.8 billion of EU funds, and the European Social Fund (ESF) with an allocation of €4.9 billion.

Different regions within the UK have been allocated varying levels of funding, with less developed areas (particularly in West Wales and the South West of England) receiving more per person than other areas. The largest single allocation of 2014-2020 ESI funding in England is for the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) to fund activities that support the reintegration of prisoners back into the work force. 53% of the cost of this £247 million project will be funded by the ESF, with the remainder met through national co-financing.

The European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) is the primary financial mechanism used for the implementation of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The EAGF consists of direct payments to farmers to stabilise their revenues and market measures to tackle specific market situations, and the UK has been allocated €22.5 billion for the period 2014-20.

Direct funding
Organisations in the UK can also apply directly to the European Commission for funding from various other streams, often on a competitive basis following calls for applications. The UK is one of the leading Member States in securing funding for research and innovation and various other projects, with around 14% of funds allocated from the Horizon 2020 programme going to the UK, and British universities are in the top four higher education recipients to date. The typical aggregate value of direct funding is around £1-1.5 billion per year.

In addition, projects in the UK can be supported by EU institutions with funding from outside the EU Budget. Most notably, the European Investment Bank (EIB) – which borrows money on capital markets and lends it on favourable terms to projects that support EU objectives – committed an average of €5.4 billion to UK projects each year between 2011 and 2017. Many of these were major infrastructure projects, as well as some supporting growth and employment.

Access for non-Member States and the impact of Brexit
Non-Member States also have access to certain streams of EU funding. Countries that are closely aligned with the EU and participate in programmes alongside Member States typically have to make payments into the EU Budget, generally relative to the size of their economy. Other funding streams are available for countries seeking accession to the EU or sharing a border with it, and some aid funding also goes to developing countries through instruments such as the European Development Fund.

The UK Government has guaranteed all funding from the EU until the end of 2020, regardless of whether it concludes a deal with the EU; the UK has said that it wishes to continue to participate in some EU programmes, but the exact form that this will take (and domestic replacements for funding) will be a subject of further negotiations and policy-making.
 
We poured £13 billion in to the eu in 2017, for the princely sum of £4 billion back.

The UK's EU membership fee

Probably the same in 2018.
Not a zero sum game, as you've been told endlessly. Single market access ensures we get more in economic activity than we put in.

You'll make some crap up what's definitely going to happen to the EU in 10 years to justify your poor reasoning, no doubt...
 
I'n not sure inciting racial hatred is a quality I would associate with your average member of the ERG or a Jewish person, but judging by the tone of your comment, you must have a different view and would appear to find it acceptable. Unless I'm reading too much into the tone of your reply, which is of course always a possibility. Perhaps you can put me right?
Your’re perfectly right in
That respect, but it it is also perfectly clear from the political agenda here the the policy has been to diminish the majority at any opportunity. This is not new, it’s been going on with positive discrimination and equal ops since the 70’s, through to CrE in the late 90’s. Everything is too white, does not mean the minority countries. Notably the Commission is very white and very left wing. In terms of anti Jewish, no I’m not, as far as I am concerned German Jews were firstly German, not Jewish. But that whole agenda has been hijacked for political purposes. They were human beings first and foremost, but that does not stop the religious elites launching bandwagons for their own purposes. That is an important distinction. But if we are prevented from pointing that out, it’s hardly fair is it?
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Furthermore @Auld-Yin . This took another 30s...

UK funding from the EU - Commons Library briefing - UK Parliament

Public and private sector organisations in the UK receive funding from the EU through various channels – the UK received a total of €6.3 billion (about £5.5 billion) in 2017. The majority of EU funding is administered in partnership with national and regional authorities in Member States, though a share of it is directly administered by the European Commission.

The two most significant funding channels for the UK are the European Structural and Investment (ESI) funds and the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund. For the current funding period (2014-20), the UK has been allocated €17.2 billion and €22.5 billion through these funds respectively.

The ESI Funds are the EU’s instrument for reducing disparities in the level of development of its various regions and for helping less developed regions to catch up. The bulk of UK funding via this channel comes through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), which has been allocated €5.8 billion of EU funds, and the European Social Fund (ESF) with an allocation of €4.9 billion.

Different regions within the UK have been allocated varying levels of funding, with less developed areas (particularly in West Wales and the South West of England) receiving more per person than other areas. The largest single allocation of 2014-2020 ESI funding in England is for the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) to fund activities that support the reintegration of prisoners back into the work force. 53% of the cost of this £247 million project will be funded by the ESF, with the remainder met through national co-financing.

The European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) is the primary financial mechanism used for the implementation of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The EAGF consists of direct payments to farmers to stabilise their revenues and market measures to tackle specific market situations, and the UK has been allocated €22.5 billion for the period 2014-20.

Direct funding
Organisations in the UK can also apply directly to the European Commission for funding from various other streams, often on a competitive basis following calls for applications. The UK is one of the leading Member States in securing funding for research and innovation and various other projects, with around 14% of funds allocated from the Horizon 2020 programme going to the UK, and British universities are in the top four higher education recipients to date. The typical aggregate value of direct funding is around £1-1.5 billion per year.

In addition, projects in the UK can be supported by EU institutions with funding from outside the EU Budget. Most notably, the European Investment Bank (EIB) – which borrows money on capital markets and lends it on favourable terms to projects that support EU objectives – committed an average of €5.4 billion to UK projects each year between 2011 and 2017. Many of these were major infrastructure projects, as well as some supporting growth and employment.

Access for non-Member States and the impact of Brexit
Non-Member States also have access to certain streams of EU funding. Countries that are closely aligned with the EU and participate in programmes alongside Member States typically have to make payments into the EU Budget, generally relative to the size of their economy. Other funding streams are available for countries seeking accession to the EU or sharing a border with it, and some aid funding also goes to developing countries through instruments such as the European Development Fund.

The UK Government has guaranteed all funding from the EU until the end of 2020, regardless of whether it concludes a deal with the EU; the UK has said that it wishes to continue to participate in some EU programmes, but the exact form that this will take (and domestic replacements for funding) will be a subject of further negotiations and policy-making.
"allocation of 2014-2020 ESI funding in England"
Not new money then, just what had already been agreed. I am looking for new money agreed by Brussels since the referendum, bearing in mind we are still full (paying) members.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Not a zero sum game, as you've been told endlessly. Single market access ensures we get more in economic activity than we put in.

You'll make some crap up what's definitely going to happen to the EU in 10 years to justify your poor reasoning, no doubt...
Again you seem to be working on the mistaken belief that post brexit all cross Chanel trade will cease.
 
One of Cabbagepatches weaker performances, the yank accent seems to take gravitas from normally tip top actor.

What are your thoughts?
I'm afraid I missed most of it. We had rather a large storm and lost telly for most of the night (the perils of relying on satellite).
Something like 118 litres per sq metre over a 12 hour period. This taken this morning just down the road from me:
flood.png
 
Not a zero sum game, as you've been told endlessly. Single market access ensures we get more in economic activity than we put in.
And Trade between the UK and the EU will surely end after Brexit? What is your so called "economic activity"? A clean profit for the UK by trading with the EU, no deficit? Not exporting £274 billion but importing £341 billion?

PS: Someone forgot my two Hamburgers princess.
 
Your’re perfectly right in
That respect, but it it is also perfectly clear from the political agenda here the the policy has been to diminish the majority at any opportunity. This is not new, it’s been going on with positive discrimination and equal ops since the 70’s, through to CrE in the late 90’s. Everything is too white, does not mean the minority countries. Notably the Commission is very white and very left wing. In terms of anti Jewish, no I’m not, as far as I am concerned German Jews were firstly German, not Jewish. But that whole agenda has been hijacked for political purposes. They were human beings first and foremost, but that does not stop the religious elites launching bandwagons for their own purposes. That is an important distinction. But if we are prevented from pointing that out, it’s hardly fair is it?
It’s not fair at all, but the world would appear to have gone completely and utterly mad.
 
Not a zero sum game, as you've been told endlessly. Single market access ensures we get more in economic activity than we put in.

You'll make some crap up what's definitely going to happen to the EU in 10 years to justify your poor reasoning, no doubt...
Did I ever tell you how beautiful I thought you must be? I know it’s all a front babe
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I'm afraid I missed most of it. We had rather a large storm and lost telly for most of the night (the perils of relying on satellite).
Something like 118 litres per sq metre over a 12 hour period. This taken this morning just down the road from me:
View attachment 388852
None of that furrin rubbish of liters per sq metre, how about good old British inches per hour to get an accurate picture of the events! :cool:

BTW, been lovely weather here!
 
Just a 30s google away, if you really wanted to loook...

The UK's EU membership fee

In 2017 the UK government paid £13 billion to the EU budget, and EU spending on the UK was forecast to be £4 billion.

The UK gets money back
The government then gets some of that money back, mainly through payments to farmers and for poorer areas of the country such as Wales and Cornwall.

In 2017, the UK's ‘public sector receipts’ are estimated to be £4 billion.

So overall we paid in £8.9 billion more than we got back.

The Treasury figures note payments the EU makes directly to the private sector, such as research grants. In 2015, these were worth an estimated £1.5 billion, so including them could reduce our net contribution further still.

The money we get back will be spent on things the government may or may not choose to fund upon leaving the EU. It’s not enough to look at the net contribution in isolation because what we get back isn’t fully under our control.



View attachment 388838
cheers flash.

better late than never.
 
Not a zero sum game, as you've been told endlessly. Single market access ensures we get more in economic activity than we put in.

You'll make some crap up what's definitely going to happen to the EU in 10 years to justify your poor reasoning, no doubt...
Being in the single market isn't the be all and end all you xenophobic isolationist.

We trade allez uber die welt. And pay the eu for the privilege.

you dense cretin.
 

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