Brexit - The Final

Apparently magic grandad doesn't like cars ,,
snip " A barrage of punitive anti-car measures planned by the Labour Party will force almost two-thirds of all car journeys off the roads, according to Transport Secretary Grant Shapps. Measures being considered by Mr Corbyn’s party include fuel duty hikes, road pricing, workplace parking charges, reducing motorway speed limits and cancelling new road schemes. Just two weeks ago a Labour Party report outlined how the party will deliver net zero carbon emissions by 2030".
 
Apparently magic grandad doesn't like cars ,,
snip " A barrage of punitive anti-car measures planned by the Labour Party will force almost two-thirds of all car journeys off the roads, according to Transport Secretary Grant Shapps. Measures being considered by Mr Corbyn’s party include fuel duty hikes, road pricing, workplace parking charges, reducing motorway speed limits and cancelling new road schemes. Just two weeks ago a Labour Party report outlined how the party will deliver net zero carbon emissions by 2030".
Yup, let’s fvck the economy ( load up extra costs for supplyers whilst reducing consumers disposable income. )That’ll work.
 
Pathetic.
Many things can be described as "pathetic", I could go into the pathetic situation that led to the "reservists" taking on the lead role in that particular period, I could also go into the pathetic and generally ineffective attempts at "revenge" taken towards the end of the deployment to put those "reservists" in their place but you appear to be bitter enough already.
 
Many things can be described as "pathetic", I could go into the pathetic situation that led to the "reservists" taking on the lead role in that particular period, I could also go into the pathetic and generally ineffective attempts at "revenge" taken towards the end of the deployment to put those "reservists" in their place but you appear to be bitter enough already.
No bitterness here, but 8/10 for projection. I added some reality to your posts and voila - you pipe up huffing and puffing about some perceived injustice years ago.
 
One for the trade moon howlers

Japanese Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said on Wednesday that he hoped Britain would join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), an 11-member free trade agreement, after it leaves the European Union.

Nishimura told reporters at the Japan National Press Club that negotiations about Britain’s entry into the free trade bloc can’t really take place as long as it remains an EU member.

He also gives you the reason that the UK has not been signing up trade deals.

F**k all to do with the UK and everything to do with the EU.
 
Not huffing or puffing at all and the perceptions of injustice weren't mine.
If you say so champ.
ETA Apologies to genuine Brexit posters for the thread drift.
 
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Not in a million years.

You won't turn up for Sluggy and you definitely won't announce who you are on here to the others there.

A pony to H4H if I'm wrong and if the other Arrse attendees vouch for your attendance.

Put up or STFU, yellah fellah.
Currently sitting next to @jarrod248 and was also with @supermatelot @adminetc yesterday

Time to cough the cash, Mr. Angry.
 
With respect to the UK's loss of trade with the Commonwealth, the problems may have started with EFTA and increased with the EEC. I don't know enough about what happened under EFTA to know the answer to that however.

Here's a Bank of Canada report which has some historical background. I'm not entirely sure when it was published, but it doesn't reference any data past the early 2000s, so that is the probable publication date. I don't recommend reading it unless you are looking for a cure for insomnia, but it has a few bits of information which are relevant to this discussion.
Economic Integration in Europe:Its Effects on Canada
Much of it consists of a highly technical statistical study on trade with the EEC/EU which is now out of date and overtaken by subsequent events, but it provides some historical background on trade with the UK which is relevant to your point. I'll quote representative samples of the most relevant bits.

Here they note that Canada as well as Australia and New Zealand were concerned over the loss of UK markets when the UK was looking to join the EEC.


After WWII the UK accounted for more than a quarter of Canadian exports, while the US accounted for 37 percent.


Over and over again in the report they refer to the "dramatic fall in the relative importance of Canadian exports to the United Kingdom" after the UK joined the EEC and that this remains even after taking into account trade with the US. Central bank economists are not generally noted for hyperbole, so I don't believe they were exaggerating when they said this


Here again they note that Canada, Australia, and New Zealand were all affected by the UK joining the EEC.


And again, from another perspective, they note that increased UK trade with the EU came at the expense of loss of trade for Canada, Australia and New Zealand.


They note repeatedly that Canada's overall trade with Europe declined over the study period, and that this decline was accounted for by the dramatic drop in trade with the UK.


I suspect that Canada was less adversely affected by these events than Australia and New Zealand were, as Canada was more able to compensate by increasing trade with the nearby US.
Ah now that's an interesting narrative. I joined Customs in 1976 so a lot of this comes from memory rather than documentary evidence. But EFTA really didn't appear to have any significant effect on our relationship with the commonwealth. For a start we were heavy on the General system of Preferences, GSP and in my HO it would have been more useful for Europe to have converted to the EFTA system rather than to evolve into the EU.

But IRRC the old WTO which we started off being a member of used GSP as an alternative to financial aid. Don't forget that we joined with the BENELUX to form the EEC. France had already done their deal to join the ISC Iron and steel community into what became the EEC. It was France that repeatedly said no-but you can already see the Schuman mentality creeping in. But a lot of EFTA was hived into the EEC.

That said I can recall when New Zealand lamb was bit of a luxury in the butchers. So I think you have to view that as a matter of scale bearing in mind that at the time we were oodles away from the kinds of delivery systems we have now, when they say a dramatic drop.

so to put it in context- 1970-85 is a period of 15 years. a drop of 54% is an average of 3.6% PA, which is not a huge drop overall except in the context of notional increases. It also follows that if cheaper alternatives can be found elsewhere then business is duty bound to reduce costs.
 
The Conservative party has morphed into a neo Nazi party but the comedian leading them and his band of joke writers have a lie for every occasion so it's going well. The Labour party has Corbyn...ahem, and is surrounded by deluded commies. The most talent free bunch of knob heads ever seen in politics... or How to lose an election without even trying.

If leaving the EU to give these kind of unqualified loonies power is what you voted for then you are indeed a mong and deserve them.
Are you suggesting that these unqualified loonies (and there isn't much better on the subs bench) in our parliamentary system don't currently have power?

Begs the question of where does the power actually lay?
 
Are you suggesting that these unqualified loonies (and there isn't much better on the subs bench) in our parliamentary system don't currently have power?

Begs the question of where does the power actually lay?
No no no, the issue is he's backing Labour which has morphed into a Communist party. Historically they couldn't co exist. So perhaps this time people will learn form History and FLATTEN THE COMMUNIST PILLOCKS
 
Ah now that's an interesting narrative. I joined Customs in 1976 so a lot of this comes from memory rather than documentary evidence. But EFTA really didn't appear to have any significant effect on our relationship with the commonwealth. For a start we were heavy on the General system of Preferences, GSP and in my HO it would have been more useful for Europe to have converted to the EFTA system rather than to evolve into the EU.

But IRRC the old WTO which we started off being a member of used GSP as an alternative to financial aid. Don't forget that we joined with the BENELUX to form the EEC. France had already done their deal to join the ISC Iron and steel community into what became the EEC. It was France that repeatedly said no-but you can already see the Schuman mentality creeping in. But a lot of EFTA was hived into the EEC.

That said I can recall when New Zealand lamb was bit of a luxury in the butchers. So I think you have to view that as a matter of scale bearing in mind that at the time we were oodles away from the kinds of delivery systems we have now, when they say a dramatic drop.

so to put it in context- 1970-85 is a period of 15 years. a drop of 54% is an average of 3.6% PA, which is not a huge drop overall except in the context of notional increases. It also follows that if cheaper alternatives can be found elsewhere then business is duty bound to reduce costs.
The study wasn't entirely clear on what happened when, in terms of historical background, but prior to any changes 97% of Canadian exports entered the UK duty free. When the UK joined EFTA there was apparently considerable concern in the Commonwealth as to what this meant for the future direction of the UK (see the quotes in the Bank of Canada study). The study wasn't clear though as to what, if anything, may have changed at the time the UK entered EFTA but had not yet joined the EEC.

The basic thrust of the study was a statistical study comparing Canadian trade with the UK to Canadian trade with the rest of the EEC in early years after the UK joined. Canadian trade with the rest of Europe remained more or less stable, but that with the UK experienced a remarkable drop. The evident conclusion was that Canadian goods were displaced from the UK market by European ones once Canada was excluded by the new tariff walls.

At the time there was concern in the rest of the world about the protectionist policies of the EEC, with the term "Fortress Europe" being commonly used to describe how the EEC had walled itself off from the rest of the world (again, see the study).

I'm not suggesting that the UK should have followed a different policy at the time, nor am I suggesting that this should decide how the UK should form its future. I was however adding historical perspective to statements that Australia and New Zealand saw their trade with the UK suffer following the latter joining the EEC by pointing out that Canada saw similar effects, plus also pointing to a study by a reputable organisation providing evidence for all of this.
 

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