Brexit - The Final

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Graculus mentioned potentially hybrid systems and that's been around a long time in the world of propulsion. It's "merely" the source of the electricity that's the variant.




It doesn't take a lot of imagination (*) to come up with such things as removable "power eggs" that can be slotted in and out as dictated by such things as specific route demands or technology updates.

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A lot of technological imagination, yes, but not much conceptual imagination.
Endless.
 
Other navies have enjoyed some success at running multiply-sourced electric engines (eg, AIP + batteries).

I'm not normally given to gambling, which is why I'm not going to predict when we'll have cost-effective long-range electric transport systems (apart from rail), but I'm willing to bet 20p that it happens in the next 30 years.

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The only sea time I've managed to squeeze in was aboard one of Her Majesty's not-so-floaty things - bunked down between lockers with Tridents at my feet - and lots of fissioning atoms hard at work moving us around.
Endless.
 
What like China and the USA. India perhaps? Those trade deals you mean?
People we already trade with on WTO or partially EU bilateral deals? 40 odd % with the EU and around 12% on top of that - do the sums for the other three and it'll be close to 100.
 
Other navies have enjoyed some success at running multiply-sourced electric engines (eg, AIP + batteries).

I'm not normally given to gambling, which is why I'm not going to predict when we'll have cost-effective long-range electric transport systems (apart from rail), but I'm willing to bet 20p that it happens in the next 30 years.

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The only sea time I've managed to squeeze in was aboard one of Her Majesty's not-so-floaty things - bunked down between lockers with Tridents at my feet - and lots of fissioning atoms hard at work moving us around.
Apropos electric vehicles... 200 mile range - probably enough for city parcel couriers etc - but not entirely sure about the retro aspect (or the price for white van man)... Morris Commercial revived with 1940s-style electric van

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Says the irony free little shift worker who spends his breaks tracking down my every post...

You're coming across ever so well
Part time shift worker:)
I see you're getting angry that an anonymous bloke rates your posts according to their content. Maybe you could go running to the Mods again?

I could put you on "ignore" like so many do. But I haven't.

Hush.
 

ClentBoy

On ROPS
On ROPs
People we already trade with on WTO or partially EU bilateral deals? 40 odd % with the EU and around 12% on top of that - do the sums for the other three and it'll be close to 100.
No economic reason for NOT leaving on WTO rules we could immediatly rejoin EFTA and operate within the EU on the same sort of rules the Swiss have leaving us free do worldwide deals. The arguments against leaving on Wto are purely political or social
 
Part time shift worker:)
I see you're getting angry that an anonymous bloke rates your posts according to their content. Maybe you could go running to the Mods again?

I could put you on "ignore" like so many do. But I haven't.

Hush.
Angry?

Just mildly curious as to why a grown man is so achingly desperate for attention.
 
Part time shift worker:)
I see you're getting angry that an anonymous bloke rates your posts according to their content. Maybe you could go running to the Mods again?

I could put you on "ignore" like so many do. But I haven't.

Hush.
The grizzling little tit does like running to the Mods. Uber grass.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Skidders

Remainers keep going on about trade. Do you think paying £8 Billion a year whilst running up a massive trade deficit is value for money ?



How much do the Aussies pay a year for TPP membership ?

You really need to engage your brain before hitting the keyboard.
This foreign trade thing. It’s quite the mystery to you isn’t it. It’s not necessarily the upfront cost of everything.
You really did fall for what was written on the side of that bus.
 
No economic reason for NOT leaving on WTO rules we could immediatly rejoin EFTA and operate within the EU on the same sort of rules the Swiss have leaving us free do worldwide deals. The arguments against leaving on Wto are purely political or social
Yes, we could in principle join EFTA, but not immediately and not just by rocking up and getting a membership card at the till. Plus, HMG have, apparently, already said they're not going to.


On Brexit, what dialogue has EFTA had with?

  • the EU
The EEA EFTA States have raised the issue of the implications of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU for the EEA Agreement in the EEA Joint Committee and in the EEA Council. There have also been extensive contacts between the EEA EFTA States and the EU institutions and Member States, both at ministerial level and at the level of senior officials and experts.

A dialogue has been established at ministerial level, with regular meetings of EEA EFTA Ministers and the EU’s Chief Negotiator, Mr Michel Barnier, in the context of the biannual EEA Council meetings. A close dialogue has been established between the EU’s Brexit negotiating team (Task Force 50) and the EEA EFTA States.

The three EEA EFTA States and the EU agree on the need to safeguard the EEA Agreement, and ensure the continuation of a well-functioning, homogenous Internal Market after Brexit. Switzerland also has regular exchanges with the EU and its Member States.

  • the UK
All the EFTA states have engaged in bilateral dialogue with the UK with the aim to maintain close economic and trade relations with the UK after the country leaves the EU. Discussions with the UK on the implications of Brexit for EEA EFTA-UK relations were launched in the immediate aftermath of the Brexit referendum. Switzerland set up several dialogues with the UK (1) a so-called Continuity Dialogue which deals with horizontal issues and oversees progress in each area, and (2) Specific Dialogues in areas currently covered by the CH/EU agreements.

There has also been considerable interest from the UK for information about EFTA and the EEA. Following requests from the UK, representatives from the EFTA States and the Secretariat have met with members of various committees of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, as well as from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The UK is a very important trading partner for all the EFTA States. All of them want to keep an open mind to all possible options to safeguard the close economic and cultural ties between the countries.

How is EFTA preparing for the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement?

The EFTA States are preparing both for a scenario in which the EU and the UK conclude a Withdrawal Agreement in time, and a no deal scenario.

The EEA EFTA States and the UK are ready to finalise an agreement which will mirror the relevant parts of the EU-UK withdrawal agreement. The key issue concerns citizens’ rights, but the agreement also covers other separation issues – such as goods placed on the market, IPR, ongoing police and judicial cooperation, judicial procedures, data protection, and public procurement - and institutional provisions.

As far as Switzerland is concerned, works for a future treaty relationship between Switzerland and the UK are also currently underway in areas including trade, migration, air and land transport, financial services and data security. These works are already at an advanced stage.

What does the EFTA Convention say about new member states?

According to Article 56 of the EFTA Convention, “any State may accede to the Convention provided that the EFTA Council decides to approve its accession, on such terms and conditions as may be set out in that decision.”

The EFTA Council is the highest governing body of EFTA, where the four EFTA States – Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland – meet at ambassadorial or ministerial level. Each Member State is represented and decisions are taken by consensus.

If the UK would apply to join EFTA, how would the EFTA States respond?

The UK government has clearly indicated that it does not intend to apply for membership of EFTA. However, if the UK would seek to re-join EFTA, EFTA Member States would carefully examine the application. A request for membership of EFTA would be considered by the EFTA Council, where decisions are taken by consensus. It is not timely to prejudge what the outcome would be as EFTA remains open to examining all options to safeguard the interests of its Member States.

If the UK would re-join EFTA, would it automatically become party to the EEA Agreement?

Not automatically, as each EFTA state decides on its own whether it applies to be party to the EEA Agreement or not. According to Article 128 of the EEA Agreement, “any European State becoming a member of the Community shall, and the Swiss Confederation or any European State becoming a member of EFTA may, apply to become a party to this Agreement. It shall address its application to the EEA Council.” The EEA Council takes political decisions leading to the amendment of the EEA Agreement, including the possible enlargement of the EEA. Decisions by the EEA Council are taken by consensus between all EU Member States on the one hand and the three EEA EFTA States - Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway - on the other.

If the UK would re-join EFTA, would it also become party to EFTA’s worldwide free trade agreements?

Any State that becomes a member of EFTA has an obligation to apply to become a party to EFTA’s existing free trade agreements according to Article 56 of the EFTA Convention. The accession of a new Member State to our FTAs can only be negotiated with the consent of the other party or parties to the agreement. All of our FTAs include provisions that regulate the accession to the FTA in question, stipulating that terms and conditions have to be agreed upon by the acceding Party and all existing Parties to the FTA.

If the UK would re-join EFTA, how would it affect

Fisheries:
The EFTA Convention guarantees free trade in fish and other maritime products between the Member States. A UK membership would therefore mean better market access in the UK for these products than the current EFTA States have today.

Agriculture: When it comes to agriculture, the EFTA Convention has specific commitments for market access in agriculture for each Member State. These would have to be negotiated for any new member state as part of the accession process.

Migration: The EFTA Convention guarantees the free movement of people between the Member States. This would also apply between the UK and the current EFTA States in the event of a UK membership in EFTA.

If the UK remains in a customs union with the EU, could it still join EFTA?

Art. 56.3 of the EFTA Convention states that a new EFTA member state ‘shall apply to become a party to the free trade agreements between the Member States on the one hand and third states, unions of states or international organisations on the other.’ As a member of a customs union, a country acceding to EFTA could not comply with this obligation. EFTA membership does not preclude from entering into a customs arrangement with the EU; existing EFTA countries govern their relation to the EU through different instruments.
 

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