Brexit - The Final

#61
The people dripping about Bercow's intervention are missing the utter constitutional carnage initiated by a Government losing multiple vital votes by 140+ margins and even, somehow, surviving.

Parliament has to be taken seriously, surely and it strikes me that the Speaker is upholding parliamentary dignity.
I see that the pustular @Bagl0ck has agreed with you so therefore, you must be talking shite. :)
 
#62
#63
The people dripping about Bercow's intervention are missing the utter constitutional carnage initiated by a Government losing multiple vital votes by 140+ margins and even, somehow, surviving not doing what it said it would, namely delivering on the result of the referendum! Of course this was before the result was known!

Parliament has to be taken seriously, surely and it strikes me that the Speaker is upholding parliamentary dignity.
I'll take Parliament seriously when it returns the favour. Rescind that! It should be a given. Respect is a two way ticket, not in one direction
 
#64
I don't think he's a very pleasant man but he does more than most to uphold procedure (I'm thinking Gorbals Mick and sundry predecessors). I'd argue that this die was cast back in December when parliament voted to hold the government in contempt over its failure to release the cabinet legal advice on the Brexit deal.
The disagree is because of the block. The die was cast on 24 June 2016 when the result was known.
 
#65
Is it the final, people having been losing faith in politicians in the UK for a long time

Their handling of Brexit has shown their contempt for the common man

If there is one good that comes out of this, perhaps there will be more calls for direct democracy borne out of distaste for modern politicians

I don't think Brexit is enough, we need to remove as much power from politicians as possible and give the electorate more of a say in day to day decision making
The problem with that is the bit in block. They already have for one issue! Look where that's goy us.
 
#68
Whether Brexit happens or not, I am also intrigued as to what will happen to parliament. Will the brewing shitstorm, contempt and hatred for pretty much most of the sitting MP's just evaporate as it did after the expenses scandal? Or will there be genuine change?
The trouble is that many voters like me may be forced to vote for the scumbag that is currently there just so Momentum cannot get power. Dr Phillip Lee has been a turd in every vote so far, even though his constituency voted 53.9% in favour of leaving. I would love to get rid of the traitorous, smug little twat but without a third party of any substance, a vote against him is a vote for Corbyn and I don't hate my country enough to do that.
It's about loving your/our country.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#73
That'll be 17m voters... out of...
The 33+m that could be bothered to vote, how many times do you have to be told?
 
#74
Is it the final, people having been losing faith in politicians in the UK for a long time

Their handling of Brexit has shown their contempt for the common man

If there is one good that comes out of this, perhaps there will be more calls for direct democracy borne out of distaste for modern politicians

I don't think Brexit is enough, we need to remove as much power from politicians as possible and give the electorate more of a say in day to day decision making
Direct democracy?

Survivor: the programme where people are voted off the island.

Brexit: where people vote the island off the programme.
 
#75
Jeremy Hunt yesterday

The foreign secretary said there were "encouraging signs" that opponents of the deal were slowly coming round.

But he said another vote would only be held before Thursday's EU summit if ministers were "confident" of victory.
Passing Brexit deal needs 'a lot more work'

Bercow rules out a 3rd vote last night.

Conclusion: May was getting her arrse handed to her on a plate again.

Never mind. Tick Tock says the clock.
 
#76
Indeed, "Take back control" they said. There's a lot of IBS sufferers on arrse mind, Irritable Brexit Syndrome appears to make some angry. Most entertaining.
Don't get me wrong, if Brexit is prevented I will be positively incandescent

But right now I can do little except watch Parliament implode, which I do find quite funny
 
#78
The wonderful EU.

Meanwhile, the EU’s other showdown with a democratic European state is going badly wrong. The Swiss are holding out against the hegemony of the European Court and an attempt to gut their national sovereignty.

Switzerland is facing an excruciating squeeze. Its old bilateral accords with the EU are no longer deemed acceptable. Brussels wants to shut down the idiosyncratic “Swiss model” once and for all.

The country has until the end of June to submit to the EU’s new framework agreement, or see its trading and financial access progressively cut off.
The Swiss people are teaching us how to deal with an EU trade ultimatum

This has been going on for over 5 years.
 
#79
There are two problems - May and parliament.

It has been obvious for many months that May's deal hadn't a prayer of getting past Westminster in its present for. It only passes if we can unilaterally exit the backstop. And the EU has no intention of allowing that - they hope to derail Brexit all together. The only way May would have got a deal from the EU was to prepare seriously for a hard Brexit from the start, then invite the EU to give us a deal to prevent that. Instead she became fixated with getting a deal from the EU - any deal - without considering if she could get the resulting sh!te deal past Westminster. It has been obvious for 9 months (and discussed in this thread's predecessor) that she couldn't get the deal passed unless the backstop was removed - yet she held steady on course for the iceberg.

Parliament - which is still dominated by remain supporting MP's - has used May sh!te deal as an excuse to try and derail Brexit. With the opposition holding the further hope that they can bring down the government and bring about a premature General Election.

Our problems stem from putting political pygmies in charge at Westminster.

Wordsmith
she has painted herself into a corner

When the original backstop was agreed in principle she could have held a vote on it and if it had been defeated she would have had a greater hand to get it renegotiated (before the whole WA was agreed in principle).

Of course she also didn’t foresee a problem with the backstop and the DUP, which is absolutely dumbfounding.

She delayed the vote on the WA ... was it twice.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#80
That'll be 17m voters... out of...
That element of the electorate which could be bothered to vote (and, of course, 17 million more than voted to join).
 

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