Brexit - The Final

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Approx £7k a year pension contributions ?

Is that this massive Academic pension you were boasting about.

Oh my. You are in for one hellava shock.

A glorious future in a one bed council flat awaits!
 
11.5k in the first year. Regardless of scheme
Brilliant.

If we strip out projected growth and focus on the 11K per year. It will take you about 50 years to get a pension of around £1000 per month.

If you had being paying attention about 6 weeks ago, you would have seen me trying to explain this to Baggy. Unfortunately Baggy was so obtuse, it couldn't work out the difference between a Salary and a Pension Pot.
 
I don't think electorates have noticed, in anything like enough numbers to stop them. Also don't forget many actually want further integration and believe in the project, or at least the propagandised version of what the EU is.

My view is many in the EU itself, don't really know what they want if they ever get their wish.. My guess would be the day after the EU morphs into a sovereign state, the loss of impetus will see the union take itself down a very dark path.

It’s astounding how many people under 40 actually believe it was nearly impossible to travel to and around Europe before we became members of EUtopia
Apparently, I must have been asleep at all the myriad passport and visa checks I can’t remenber driving through for decades.
 
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Brilliant.

If we strip out projected growth and focus on the 11K per year. It will take you about 50 years to get a pension of around £1000 per month.

If you had being paying attention about 6 weeks ago, you would have seen me trying to explain this to Baggy. Unfortunately Baggy was so obtuse, it couldn't work out the difference between a Salary and a Pension Pot.
The 'regardless of scheme' bit was what tweaked my interest, because it is simply not true.
 
I would imagine that we will get a tale of woe on here shortly where Crusty complains that the contract was altered, the pay wasn't good enough, multiple items of baggage couldn't be left scattered around the lab and that his boss was an extreme right-wing racist.

In short, all these entirely avoidable factors (avoidable if Brexit is cancelled) have conspired to ensure his resignation in short order. A better, brighter future at Harvard awaits.
 
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Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
I don't think electorates have noticed, in anything like enough numbers to stop them. Also don't forget many actually want further integration and believe in the project, or at least the propagandised version of what the EU is.

My view is many in the EU itself, don't really know what they want if they ever get their wish.. My guess would be the day after the EU morphs into a sovereign state, the loss of impetus will see the union take itself down a very dark path.
Some parts of the population have noticed; hence the rise of the populist parties.

I do accept that some parts of the population are happy about further integration. However, the EU is at the moment tinkering around the edges of the problem. At some point they will require a successor to the Treaty of Lisbon, at which point the EU's direction of travel will be far clearer.

Treaty change requires unanimous assent. Although some governments could force things through without the consent of the electorate (as Gordon Brown did for the Lisbon treaty) other countries are mandated to hold referendums. And Germany will be required by its constitutional court to hold a referendum. Still further countries may well offer referendums to given them a reason to oppose the new treaty. There are too many countries that will block a new treaty. To name but three:
  1. Germany - because it doesn't want to give the EU control of its cheque book
  2. Italy - which is increasingly hostile to the EU
  3. Poland - because the EU is interfering in its internal affairs
As such, the chances of the EU getting the treaty required to reform the euro through are pretty remote.

Wordsmith
 
Orange Man Bad.

All Remainers absolutely hate President Trump for reasons they are unable to articulate coherently.
Remainers tend to be left wing, left wingers tend to be anti semitic and hate America, Trump is Amercian, a friend of Israel, and not a screaming mincing lefty
 
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overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Some parts of the population have noticed; hence the rise of the populist parties.

I do accept that some parts of the population are happy about further integration. However, the EU is at the moment tinkering around the edges of the problem. At some point they will require a successor to the Treaty of Lisbon, at which point the EU's direction of travel will be far clearer.

Treaty change requires unanimous assent. Although some governments could force things through without the consent of the electorate (as Gordon Brown did for the Lisbon treaty) other countries are mandated to hold referendums. And Germany will be required by its constitutional court to hold a referendum. Still further countries may well offer referendums to given them a reason to oppose the new treaty. There are too many countries that will block a new treaty. To name but three:
  1. Germany - because it doesn't want to give the EU control of its cheque book
  2. Italy - which is increasingly hostile to the EU
  3. Poland - because the EU is interfering in its internal affairs
As such, the chances of the EU getting the treaty required to reform the euro through are pretty remote.

Wordsmith
4 You neglected to mention Greece, because The Eu (Germany) has impounded their cheque book!
 
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