Brexit Phase Two - Trade

Less than we would have spunked into Brussels, especially once they got their finance minister in place and a stranglehold on national treasuries. How much do you think the EU would leave us for pocket money?
Funny you should say that - read today on Bloomberg / MSN / or somewhere I don't recall that :- the UK NET input to EU was / is (* for pedants ) £ NINE BILLION.....and yet it further went on to say that:- EU HAS A £ THIRTEEN BILLION HOLE TO FILL - after we're gone from the blaggers.

Pocket money ? HAHAHAHA drinks on you auld_yin....
 
A lot of shiney new 'FUNDED BY THE EU' roads and airports are not going to be built.
In The Times yesterday it stated that the recent EU law on divorce, lays down the 50/50 equal share rule to Husband and wife. In the case of our divorce from the EU, who is the wife and who is the husband, and what will happen to their home made 50/50 rule?
 
I particularly liked the bit about "super tight profit margins" here in the UK, so he cuts the workforce by 200 to maintain some.kind of profit, then decides that it isn't enough so moves production to a country with a cheaper workforce with a questionable workers rights policy, its all about the cash, not the workers.

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Maybe we should leave that bigger, nasty beasty called Globalisation. In doing so, let the Chinese and the Americans and the EU dictate trade terms to us. That should be fun.
 
Stumbled across this blog and, in an attempt to drag the thread vaguely back to its title thought I'd share it.

Trade β Blog

It reinforces my view that transition is vital. Agreeing trade deals even to broadly replicate what we have now is a vastly more complex process than we are being led to believe by Liam Fox and others. Rush it and we'll get it wrong.

Business needs time to reorganise. One issue that jumps out for me is country of origin. Currently manufacturers can source widgets from across the EU and meet country of origin rule for extant deals. Will new deals require UK goods to be 100% UK sourced? If not how will manufacturers achieve this inside 12 months?

I've repeatedly said I believe Brexit is a mistake, but that ship has sailed. The biggest risk is now rushing to complete a process the government does not yet appear to have fully scoped. Other countries will, if we're not careful take advantage of us. South Korea, for example can focus on a UK deal and potentially amending their EU deal as a consequence. The UK meamwhile will potentially be juggling dozens of complex, often interconnected deals.
 
And no doubt they will be asking the government for compensation soon, if not already.
You keep bleating on about the government having two years to get planning done, yet here we have farmers after two years in the same situation. Note, we haven't left the EU yet so migrant workers can still come over. Maybe they can get work back home for the same money and don't want to travel.

I suppose as far as you are concerned the UK's lack of medals at the Olympics is down to Brexit! Did you blame the disaster of a test series on Brexit also.

Is there anything you will not blame Brexit for?
Er, 'can' is a modal verb, oft employed like 'could.' However, want to? That is a Stative - expressing amongst other things emotions unseen - Verb.
Everyone has choices and, the State of the UK at the moment is not thought welcoming.
 
Stumbled across this blog and, in an attempt to drag the thread vaguely back to its title thought I'd share it.

Trade β Blog

It reinforces my view that transition is vital. Agreeing trade deals even to broadly replicate what we have now is a vastly more complex process than we are being led to believe by Liam Fox and others. Rush it and we'll get it wrong.

Business needs time to reorganise. One issue that jumps out for me is country of origin. Currently manufacturers can source widgets from across the EU and meet country of origin rule for extant deals. Will new deals require UK goods to be 100% UK sourced? If not how will manufacturers achieve this inside 12 months?

I've repeatedly said I believe Brexit is a mistake, but that ship has sailed. The biggest risk is now rushing to complete a process the government does not yet appear to have fully scoped. Other countries will, if we're not careful take advantage of us. South Korea, for example can focus on a UK deal and potentially amending their EU deal as a consequence. The UK meamwhile will potentially be juggling dozens of complex, often interconnected deals.

Yes, all absolutely vital once the Government works out what it is doing.

In the meantime a transitional arrangement remains as yet not agreed.
 

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