Brexit Phase Two - Trade

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Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Percentages don't really mean a lot TBH, 4.5% of 100 quid is less than 1.3% of a thousand, it's all relevant to the actual sum that the % is taken from.
I hope you are not a Maths teacher!
Why? 4.5% of 100 is 4.5, 1.3% of 1000 is 13, so the higher the base figure, the higher the worth of the actual %. Higher starting figure means that you end up with a higher sum after adding any %. In the case of the NHS costs, how much has it gone up from the pre 79 figure to today's figure.
Cost in Bns for 1978/79 - 7.4, 4.4% = 32,560,000
Cost in Bns for 2014/15 - 114.4, 1.3% = 148,200,000
 
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Similar could be said about those from the Indian subcontinent in UK, who were brought over for similar reasons as the Turks to Germany!
Of course and Turks over here are almost as numerous as over there. There's also the Chinese diaspora, the Nigerian, the Jewish. The essential difference with the Chinese has been the Political attitude of China to them. If you weren't in china or have A Chinese passport you were not Chinese. What a lot of people don't get is that many of these groups do not feel particularly that they are part of any country unless it suits them. You never hear of most of them, until they need to make a point. What we do know is that mind their own BUSINESS in the literal sense but what their true financial contribution is remains open to interpretation. I'm not being rude about that but ten years doing border/finance work was an eyeopener and we had to re-educate ourselves rapidly. There is little point being moralistic.
 
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Deleted 154930

Guest
I'm old enough to be familiar with the film but don't see the connection with your user name.
Given I came up with the name in around 30 seconds or so, there really wasn't much thought given to it. But, I suppose my brain was thinking: Signals, Electronics, Films, Comms, Ecomcon.
 
Ah.

The same article that you posted 2 days ago, written by two Brexit cheerleaders, on a Brexit website, and misrepresented by you. What they argue is RELATIVE growth has fallen. They also pick and choose their indicators - GDP or PPP - to suit their predetermined conclusions..


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Yers, but then I studiously ignore all figures because I asked a question. Relative growth will always fall relative to itself. it can only expand so much. There are some factors of our economy that predated the EU that couldn't survive-coal being the obvious one. There are others such as steel production that would always remain cyclical to need and application. Rather than keep that nationalised we sold it to the Asian group TATA courtesy of Vaz. But lets put the boot on the other foot. What if the EU/EEC had seen aircraft production move to the UK? What if we still did commercial ship building on Korean scale. There too many ifs and too much has gone belly up and right now is floor space v the internet. I suspect that many remainers are more worried about the fact that we've stripped out and can't see us climbing back. We're also viewed as a low skills economy. Why? because we were never supposed to leave the EU and there's not a few who've taken a backhander to that extent.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Percentages don't really mean a lot TBH, 4.5% of 100 quid is less than 1.3% of a thousand, it's all relevant to the actual sum that the % is taken from.
Balls, look back. While the nhs got a 4% pa rise, which it did for years there weren’t winter crises or bed shortages.
Once they started quoting money ( which sounded a lot and wasn’t 4%) they started getting into trouble.

Even today’s May statement promised another 7 years of underfunding. And I’ve heard Hunt ascribe nhs money as a mix of Brexit and growth money.

Despite the fact that someone’s just listed next years growth as downwards and that’s from the current low standpoint.
 
Yers, but then I studiously ignore all figures because I asked a question. Relative growth will always fall relative to itself. it can only expand so much. There are some factors of our economy that predated the EU that couldn't survive-coal being the obvious one. There are others such as steel production that would always remain cyclical to need and application. Rather than keep that nationalised we sold it to the Asian group TATA courtesy of Vaz. But lets put the boot on the other foot. What if the EU/EEC had seen aircraft production move to the UK? What if we still did commercial ship building on Korean scale. There too many ifs and too much has gone belly up and right now is floor space v the internet. I suspect that many remainers are more worried about the fact that we've stripped out and can't see us climbing back. We're also viewed as a low skills economy. Why? because we were never supposed to leave the EU and there's not a few who've taken a backhander to that extent.
I love a bit of rambling stream of consciousness in the morning
 
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Deleted 154930

Guest
Back on brexit; The Government changed our economic model during the thatcher era and pretty much dumped on the rest of the country. One of the things that SHOULD happen, post-brexit, is the government, should be refocusing the economy to a different model.

Sadly, another failure of the british government during brexit negotiations, is the complete lack of planning, or thought going into changing that model.

If Corbyn, wasn't a socialist loon, much of what he and McDonnell says on strategy, is actually right.
 
Hit and miss, a Pakistani colleague, as in an immigrant and not UK born, got his Mrs over last year. She's a dentist, reckons it will take four years for her qualifications to be recognised.

India has huge issues with fraudulent quals in all professions.

Special Report: Why India's medical schools are plagued with fraud

I had a guy, who should have been teaching me stuff going by his qualifications, stood doing a goldfish impression with a simple task. One of our clients support team members thank feck.
Fraud happens world wide, all medical professions should have to sit a test if from any country other than UK and that their qualifications are the same if not better than our own.
I do not know if the BMA or who is responsible tests EU medics or not, but if they do not then that is a risk we should not take under any circumstance
 
Back on brexit; The Government changed our economic model during the thatcher era and pretty much dumped on the rest of the country. One of the things that SHOULD happen, post-brexit, is the government, should be refocusing the economy to a different model.

Sadly, another failure of the british government during brexit negotiations, is the complete lack of planning, or thought going into changing that model.

If Corbyn, wasn't a socialist loon, much of what he and McDonnell says on strategy, is actually right.
It's almost like smashing the current system in the evangelical hope that something better magically replaces it is a crap idea
 
What happens when the finance runs out? I think the point people seem to be making is that we are close to that happening. If the younger generation don't look after the older one then moving on to an old age pension will be something like booking an appointment with Dignitas.
The government seems to be slowly moving away from state to private pensions by asking that all employees contribute to a private pension scheme. I suspect that over the next 20 - 30 years the state pension will largely wither away as the snowflake generation gradually build up their own pension pots. That's actually a fairly sensible approach as the current state pensions are a bit of a Ponzi scheme - your pension is being paid for by taxpayers like me. And when I retire in 5 of so years, my state pension will be paid for by people still in employment.

No government is actually going to point out what's going on for fear of electoral unpopularity, but building up your own pension pot is the only realistic method - state pensions are going to be increasingly unaffordable as the number of pensioners rises and the number of people in work declines.

Finally - this is probably Brexit independent. I don't think the EU currently regulates national pension schemes - although it did insist Greece cut its overly generous state pensions in the last financial crisis. But this problem is due to hit the EU as well - and I don't think all countries are taking the same precautions as the UK. The EU is going to have to deal with this problem in the future - although probably a couple of decades after we've Brexited.

Wordsmith
 
It’s almost as if a well-known cheerleader for Brexit was making shit up before the vote....
Both sides made shit up before the vote. It wasn't confined to the Brexit side. Remember Osborne saying we'd need an emergency budget if we votes for Brexit.

As I've said before, the politicians and commentators on both sides of the argument did the country a disservice. Instead of an informed debate of the pros and cons of Brexit, we got a war of soundbites.

Fortunately most people I met ion the doorstep were doing their best to wade through the BS put by both sides and come to an reasonably informed decision.

Wordsmith
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Both sides made shit up before the vote. It wasn't confined to the Brexit side. Remember Osborne saying we'd need an emergency budget if we votes for Brexit.

As I've said before, the politicians and commentators on both sides of the argument did the country a disservice. Instead of an informed debate of the pros and cons of Brexit, we got a war of soundbites.

Fortunately most people I met ion the doorstep were doing their best to wade through the BS put by both sides and come to an reasonably informed decision.

Wordsmith
Man states the bleeding obvious. Fooled by bus, bigotry and sound bites. Still manages to convince himself that Brexit is a good thing.
I know. Let’s see what it says in today’s FT .
D942C131-4C98-4D12-AE1F-8DB9DFEE8BFF.jpeg
 
So the Migration Policy Institute discussion from November 2003 is valid today, is it?
You do realise there have been lots of changes in Turkey since then? Not least the fact that Turkey will get EU membership in our lifetime is as likely as you taking a day off from here.
Turkey has increasingly been moving towards a theocracy and away from with Mustafa Kemal (Atatürk)'s original vision of Turkey as a largely secular state. It's also become increasingly repressive.

The current leadership has shown no hesitation in blackmailing the EU into handing over substantial funds in return for not letting a flood of refugees over the border - a gambit I expect to be repeated at regular intervals.

Turkey is going to be a major headache for the EU for years to come. (But happily not for the UK after Brexit).

Wordsmith
 
Grieve digging his heels in

Government 'could collapse' over Brexit deal

He implied rebels would vote against it this week: "I'm absolutely sure that the group is quite determined that the meaningful vote pledge, which was given to us, has got to be fulfilled."

He added: "The alternative is that we've all got to sign up to a slavery clause now, saying whatever the government does, when it comes to January, however potentially catastrophic it might be for my constituents and my country, I'm signing in blood now that I will follow over the edge of a cliff, and that I can tell you, I am not prepared to do."
 
I have a great deal of respect for Dominic Grieve, who I think was the best Attorney-General that this country has had in years; nevertheless, on this issue I think that he is irreconcilable (as is Ken Clarke and Anna Soubry).
 
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