Brexit Phase Two - Trade

So it's doable then - in fact, quicker and cheaper than the UK setting up it's own competitor GNSS. I'd also look very carefully at what UK supplied means. Do you really think the relevant data is only physically located within the UK, given the multinational nature of the company doing the work? That individuals can't change jobs and do the same work for a different employer? Details again - but no change there, lack of attention to detail is what has killed Brexit so far.

Let me help you - no one doing the crypto is going to jack in and go work for the French.
The EU will have to generate the capability themselves, and even then, as the 5 Eyes have demonstrated, much to the regular fury of the French, we can break anything they've developed to date without breaking a sweat.

Now as to this 'quicker and cheaper'… Galileo is late, its last generations technology, its got technical flaws, its not fully functional and may never be the dream they thought it would be. The EU is already considering tenders for a replacement constellation. So, we'd both hit the ground at the same time, and we have better software and a global network of ground stations the EU doesn't.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Try getting that through Parliament. I still don't see any sign of flexibility on the part of the EU. Remember, they didn't do Cameron a favour so why should they do May one?
The EU didn't do favours for Major, Blair, Brown, as well as Cameron! The last one to get anything constructive from the EU was Maggie, which following PM's spent their time giving back!
 
If we haven't asked for access to that program, why are assorted ministers incensed by the lack of access?

You only get angry if you're being denied access to something you've been promised access to.

Wordsmith
Because it's easier to blame foreigners for everything and pull the wool over the eyes of thickos like yourself
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Your mate down the pub told you, did he? Right...
There’s a difference between mates and sources. But of course, you had a briefing, which makes it all the more accurate, honest and devoid of any spin whatsoever.


This particular department is being watched with some interest.
But you know all about that.
 
So you’re rejecting the notion of parliamentary sovereignty, this very thing, a plank of the Brexit stage is a waste of time?

And that’s another thing about the brexit campaign, it’s like it’s bi polar and determined to fight on two fronts. And we all know how that usually goes.


It’s, The Eu they are either a) so tough and unbending there will be no leeway in the negotiation and whatever we pull out in the final stage will be a done deal.
Or b) it’s so shattered and terrified by us leaving. It really needs to sell us Mercs and BMs it’ll give us a truly good deal, wave us goodbye and be ready to give us another one when we go back and say parliament says no.
Bipolar is a good term.

It's a fitting description of the UK, struggling to maintain basic services and keep its infrastructure in one piece, but still borrowing and throwing around money they don't have on overseas aid.

Cutting it's armed forces to the bone without cutting the political ambition and commitments.

It's a also a fitting description of the EU, who aspire to be a cohesive bloc, wielding power over and of hundreds of millions of people, but simultaneously held to ransom by the smallest and poorest elements.
To describe some of the member states as our trading partners stretches credibility, as I can only guess at what we may buy from or sell to the likes of Romania, Bulgaria, latvia or that up and coming new kid on the block, Albania.

Behaving as if one of the largest contributors to, and customers of the pact leaving is of no consequence to the status quo, and 'negotiating' accordingly, is as bipolar as it gets.

The drive toward further integration of fiscal, taxation, foreign policy and armed forces is described as a fantasy which no one in Europe wants, over which UK had a veto, and the loss of that veto through Brexit has apparently made it more likely to happen, despite it only being a fantasy which no one wants.

That's not bipolar. Not one little bit.
 
Name it. I could almost guarantee which one it’s not.
@History_Man means that all the customs and borders staff tied up at the airports can be sent to the ports instead, since in the event of no deal, we'll have no functioning aviation regulator and no flights from the RoW.

A plan so cunning you could put it in a dress and call it Susan
 
To describe some of the member states as our trading partners stretches credibility, as I can only guess at what we may buy from or sell to the likes of Romania, Bulgaria, latvia or that up and coming new kid on the block, Albania.

Albania?
Drugs and prostitution are its major export industries.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
@History_Man means that all the customs and borders staff tied up at the airports can be sent to the ports instead, since in the event of no deal, we'll have no functioning aviation regulator and no flights from the RoW.

A plan so cunning you could put it in a dress and call it Susan
That’s why they were so pissed off when I came through Heathrow. I thought it was just me.

It’s alright for you lot, having no borders to worry about. Just a coastline. We’ve both.
Plan Susan, eh. If that’s the plan, that’s just special.
 
That’s why they were so pissed off when I came through Heathrow. I thought it was just me.

It’s alright for you lot, having no borders to worry about. Just a coastline. We’ve both.
Plan Susan, eh. If that’s the plan, that’s just special.
It's all about taking back control.

Can you feel it?

 
The EU will have to generate the capability themselves, and even then, as the 5 Eyes have demonstrated, much to the regular fury of the French, we can break anything they've developed to date without breaking a sweat.
I defer to meerkatz, cryptologist extraordinaire. Had you only been around in 1939, Bletchley park would not have required the services of Turing, Welchman and company.

Cryptology is an incredibly complex subject that requires PhD level maths, a superlative knowledge of encryption methods and the ability to think well outside the box. To break a commercial cryptographic system is a formidable achievement; to break a military one would require the full resources of a state - and even then it might not be achievable.

Wordsmith

Edited to add: Here's a simple, entry level crypto attack.

The Padding Oracle Attack - why crypto is terrifying | Robert Heaton

The others are far more complex.
 
I defer to meerkatz, cryptologist extraordinaire. Had you only been around in 1939, Bletchley park would not have required the services of Turing, Welchman and company.

Cryptology is an incredibly complex subject that requires PhD level maths, a superlative knowledge of encryption methods and the ability to think well outside the box. To break a commercial cryptographic system is a formidable achievement; to break a military one would require the full resources of a state - and even then it might not be achievable.

Wordsmith

Edited to add: Here's a simple, entry level crypto attack.

The Padding Oracle Attack - why crypto is terrifying | Robert Heaton

The others are far more complex.

May I refer the gentleman to the French bitching that the NSA had penetrated their government and diplomatic systems for years and their never ending non happiness at GCHQ, Menwith Hills unfriendliness etc.

The French have never been happy that the UK is ihandling the crypto side of Galileo. For some reason, they suspect we may share backdoor access with the cousins. Hence their ludicrous demands for french oversight of the UK's crypto effort and a written contract confirming same and provision of the source code.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Here comes the clown again.

UK households £900 worse off since Brexit vote says Bank, but FTSE hits new high - as it happened

Right Mark, now tell us about the multi £billions the financial crash cost us and continues to cost us as the result of the greed of the banks and financial institutions that were under the auspices of the Bank of England.

Speak up, Mark. I can't seem to hear you.
He could probably tell you more than you wanted to know. Considering he arrived in 2013, some years after the bank collapse.

Mervin King might be the man who you might like a word with. Despite the fact that he was retired long before Brexit.
 
The temporary Customs backstop should alleviate the worst disruption to supply chains but I cannot see the European Commission authorising its use for more than 90 days in the first instance, with one more extension of another 90 days. It was intended for NI, not the whole of the UK.
It seems HMRC might be waking up especially in Ireland for RFTU.:-D
 
The French have never been happy that the UK is ihandling the crypto side of Galileo. For some reason, they suspect we may share backdoor access with the cousins. Hence their ludicrous demands for french oversight of the UK's crypto effort and a written contract confirming same and provision of the source code.
The only problem with putting a backdoor into a system is that it can be exploited by anyone able to find it - including Vlad the Mad. Do you really think the UK would put a back door into Galileo and render it vulnerable to any hostile state with a large team of crypto specialists?

Provision of source code is standard when analyzing new crypto systems - you can't do it properly otherwise. But then you knew that anyway...

Wordsmith
 
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