Brexit Phase Two - Trade

Auld-Yin

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There aren't any trade talks yet.

What do you think of extending the Art 50 period and the Customs Union rules?
Trade talks are ongoing, just not being discussed. Watch a lot of quick decisions made at 2359.5, as per EU SOPs.

If not then hard walk it is!
 

Auld-Yin

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It was the liberal 'Democrats' that blocked fairer constituencies.
Is that the same Party of which a former leader is advocating silencing his opposition as he seems to be losing?
 
How much longer will people indulge the ridiculous charade that the Disgraced former defence secretary Liam Fox, a man who has never negotiated a single trade agreement, can get better deals with other countries than the EU Commission, which has a team of crack negotiators with many decades of experience between them?

Of all the reasons for staying in a customs union - and better still in the EU - one of the strongest is that it would save the country from being sold out to the Americans and humiliated by the delusional and incompetent Fox and his merry band of rookie "negotiators". He's a disgraced fucktard and has no clue what he is doing. Other governments know it and are licking the lips at the prospect of rolling him over shafting the UK in this unique opportunity.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
I don't.

I think trade talks are looking decidedly shaky but that is not helped by the intransigence of and hard work by Remainiacs who are determined that the minority view should prevail.

Not very democratic and Herr Clegg is now advocating silencing his opposition. Going well for Remain? I don't think so!

I would share your concern about the remainics stalling the trade talks, if the people doing the negotiations weren’t brexiters.
The last time I looked it was the DeXeu doing it. Not the remainers.
But it’s always someone else’s fault.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
You still don't think Brexit is looking somewhat wobbly?
What is looking woobly is the form Brexit will take. Once Article 50 was triggered, the UK committed to leaving the EU precisely 2 years later. As none of the eurocrats ever thought that anyone would leave, there were no procedures in place.

Hence the need for the transition period - the plan was to use it to expend the period that the final settlement could be negotiated over. However, on one side of the equation we have Barnier, determined to stop the UK cutting tax and regulations to gain competitive advantage over the EU. And on the other we have a prime minister whose every instinct is to give ground to avoid taking any controversial decisions.

You can add into that mix the Gina Millers and the anti-Brexit Lords who've brought about a situation where legally May is required to submit the final negotiated settlement for parliamentary approval - and realise that it's already being flagged by a number of her cabinet ministers and a large chunk of her back benchers that what's she's negotiating is unacceptable to them and won't get their support, to see the enormous fuster-cluck that is building up.

So - as I've said before - the combination of Barnier setting unrealistic conditions for Britain's exit, May being to lacking in testicular fortitude to stand up to him and a significant chunk of her party being unhappy with what's being negotiated is leading us ever closer to a hard Brexit.

What I find particularly ironic is that the efforts of the remain side to throw a spanner into the Brexit works is - most probably - going to result in the outcome they most fear: a hard Brexit.

Wordsmith
 
How much longer will people indulge the ridiculous charade that the Disgraced former defence secretary Liam Fox, a man who has never negotiated a single trade agreement, can get better deals with other countries than the EU Commission, which has a team of crack negotiators with many decades of experience between them?

Of all the reasons for staying in a customs union - and better still in the EU - one of the strongest is that it would save the country from being sold out to the Americans and humiliated by the delusional and incompetent Fox and his merry band of rookie "negotiators". He's a disgraced fucktard and has no clue what he is doing. Other governments know it and are licking the lips at the prospect of rolling him over shafting the UK in this unique opportunity.
Do you read what you've written before you post?
You really are a scream.
Anyway, keep on keeping on, it's all good light relief.
 
Trade talks are ongoing, just not being discussed. Watch a lot of quick decisions made at 2359.5, as per EU SOPs.

If not then hard walk it is!
I don’t understand where you get the idea trade talks are happening. It has not featured on the agenda for any of the U.K./E.U. meetings and it’s widely agreed that although a future framework can be outlined as part of the transition talks, legally trade talks cannot start until the U.K. is a third country.

Of course, if I am wrong please do post some evidence otherwise, I would be most grateful to read it.

^^
 
What is looking woobly is the form Brexit will take. Once Article 50 was triggered, the UK committed to leaving the EU precisely 2 years later. As none of the eurocrats ever thought that anyone would leave, there were no procedures in place.

Hence the need for the transition period - the plan was to use it to expend the period that the final settlement could be negotiated over. However, on one side of the equation we have Barnier, determined to stop the UK cutting tax and regulations to gain competitive advantage over the EU. And on the other we have a prime minister whose every instinct is to give ground to avoid taking any controversial decisions.

You can add into that mix the Gina Millers and the anti-Brexit Lords who've brought about a situation where legally May is required to submit the final negotiated settlement for parliamentary approval - and realise that it's already being flagged by a number of her cabinet ministers and a large chunk of her back benchers that what's she's negotiating is unacceptable to them and won't get their support, to see the enormous fuster-cluck that is building up.

So - as I've said before - the combination of Barnier setting unrealistic conditions for Britain's exit, May being to lacking in testicular fortitude to stand up to him and a significant chunk of her party being unhappy with what's being negotiated is leading us ever closer to a hard Brexit.

What I find particularly ironic is that the efforts of the remain side to throw a spanner into the Brexit works is - most probably - going to result in the outcome they most fear: a hard Brexit.

Wordsmith
Dolchstoßlegenden redux.

Nobody anywhere has thrown any spanners in the works apart from the Tory party and it's ill advised attempts to usurp the powers of parliament, TMPM with her ill advised early election, finally the swivel eyed loons on the right of the Tory party and their intransigence when it comes to compromise.

I say again, harden the 'eff up and take a bit of ownership.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
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Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
How much longer will people indulge the ridiculous charade that the Disgraced former defence secretary Liam Fox, a man who has never negotiated a single trade agreement, can get better deals with other countries than the EU Commission, which has a team of crack negotiators with many decades of experience between them?

Of all the reasons for staying in a customs union - and better still in the EU - one of the strongest is that it would save the country from being sold out to the Americans and humiliated by the delusional and incompetent Fox and his merry band of rookie "negotiators". He's a disgraced fucktard and has no clue what he is doing. Other governments know it and are licking the lips at the prospect of rolling him over shafting the UK in this unique opportunity.
Have you anty proof that he is not getting trade deals lined uop? have you proof that he is not doing his job? Or is this just another manifestation of your febrile and rather ill brain?
 

Auld-Yin

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There's no mandate anywhere for a hard Brexit.
You think? What happens on Brexit day if no deal is done and no extension in place?

I would contend that the referendum is the mandate for hard brexit and all other negotiations are to 'soften' that blow - although all the softening seems to be on the EU side at the moment.:rolleyes:
 
You think? What happens on Brexit day if no deal is done and no extension in place?

I would contend that the referendum is the mandate for hard brexit and all other negotiations are to 'soften' that blow - although all the softening seems to be on the EU side at the moment.:rolleyes:

I do think. PMTM is in serious damage limitation mode (and doing pretty well at it). Parliament will have a bite long before next March.

Public opinion has already shifted.
 
What is looking woobly is the form Brexit will take. Once Article 50 was triggered, the UK committed to leaving the EU precisely 2 years later. As none of the eurocrats ever thought that anyone would leave, there were no procedures in place.

Hence the need for the transition period - the plan was to use it to expend the period that the final settlement could be negotiated over. However, on one side of the equation we have Barnier, determined to stop the UK cutting tax and regulations to gain competitive advantage over the EU. And on the other we have a prime minister whose every instinct is to give ground to avoid taking any controversial decisions.

You can add into that mix the Gina Millers and the anti-Brexit Lords who've brought about a situation where legally May is required to submit the final negotiated settlement for parliamentary approval - and realise that it's already being flagged by a number of her cabinet ministers and a large chunk of her back benchers that what's she's negotiating is unacceptable to them and won't get their support, to see the enormous fuster-cluck that is building up.

So - as I've said before - the combination of Barnier setting unrealistic conditions for Britain's exit, May being to lacking in testicular fortitude to stand up to him and a significant chunk of her party being unhappy with what's being negotiated is leading us ever closer to a hard Brexit.

What I find particularly ironic is that the efforts of the remain side to throw a spanner into the Brexit works is - most probably - going to result in the outcome they most fear: a hard Brexit.

Wordsmith

There's certainly a political and constitutional crisis ahead. I disagree with your prognosis, though.
 
Dolchstoßlegenden redux.

Nobody anywhere has thrown any spanners in the works apart from the Tory party and it's ill advised attempts to usurp the powers of parliament, TMPM with her ill advised early election, finally the swivel eyed loons on the right of the Tory party and their intransigence when it comes to compromise.

I say again, harden the 'eff up and take a bit of ownership.
You may not have seen the debate on the parliament channel about exactly this issue. It's actually parliament trying to usurp the function of the cabinet. The rules are quite clear. Parliament oversees the actions of Government, it is not in itself the Government. Added to which Bercow has nailed his colours to the mast now in saying he will criticise Government. This is not his function. He must now go.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
You think? What happens on Brexit day if no deal is done and no extension in place?

I would contend that the referendum is the mandate for hard brexit and all other negotiations are to 'soften' that blow - although all the softening seems to be on the EU side at the moment.:rolleyes:

You’re seriously pinning your hopes on Brexit day thing. Don’t worry Wetherspoons will probably be open early on the 30th.
 

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