Brexit Endgame

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Poland has been sucking at the EU tit ever since it's joined - and Polish infrastructure has been much improved as a result. However, two game changes have been going on.

The first is that the EU is trying to substantially interfere in Poland (and Hungary's) internal affairs.

https://euobserver.com/justice/147160
MEPs called on EU countries on Wednesday (15 January) to set concrete demands and deadlines for Hungary and Poland, which have been under prolonged EU scrutiny over the rule of law and judicial independence.
The second is that the allocation of EU structural funding is changing. Until recently, much of the funding was spent in Eastern Europe - the poorest areas of the EU. Now a lot of that funding is being stealthily switched to Club Med. There are not the poorest countries in the EU, but they are the ones at most of risk of financial collapse in the next recession - and hence the most capable of bringing down the euro. Add into the mix the withdrawal of UK contributions at the end of 2020 and Poland is going to receive far less bribes funding from the EU.

These two factors are likely to continue to fuel anti-EU feeling in the EU. As might a relatively painless Brexit - showing you can leave the EU without being punished for it.

I don't think Poland is in eminent danger of leaving the EU - but the pressure for it will slowly build in the coming years.

Wordsmith
 
Poland has been sucking at the EU tit ever since it's joined - and Polish infrastructure has been much improved as a result. However, two game changes have been going on.

The first is that the EU is trying to substantially interfere in Poland (and Hungary's) internal affairs.

https://euobserver.com/justice/147160


The second is that the allocation of EU structural funding is changing. Until recently, much of the funding was spent in Eastern Europe - the poorest areas of the EU. Now a lot of that funding is being stealthily switched to Club Med. There are not the poorest countries in the EU, but they are the ones at most of risk of financial collapse in the next recession - and hence the most capable of bringing down the euro. Add into the mix the withdrawal of UK contributions at the end of 2020 and Poland is going to receive far less bribes funding from the EU.

These two factors are likely to continue to fuel anti-EU feeling in the EU. As might a relatively painless Brexit - showing you can leave the EU without being punished for it.

I don't think Poland is in eminent danger of leaving the EU - but the pressure for it will slowly build in the coming years.

Wordsmith
Will no one think of the EU Blue flag and yellow starred sphincter sticker manufacturers, FFS!!!!

Those "Project Funded By The EU" stickers, so beloved by the week of brane, (i.e. @skid2 and @Higgs_bosun ), won't produce themselves!!


A fecking hilarious, juvenile interpretation of the glorious 'co-eu funding' (read UK taxpayer in human speak).
You'd have to be a right spakker to interpret that as a good thing......there are a few about, roughly 16 million.
 
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Cant we just stick a simple line like "Brtain contributes X pounds To the EU and this is funded by the Y pounds EU allocated UK in return ? The public could then make up their own minds ?
 
Will no one think of the EU Blue flag and yellow starred sphincter sticker manufacturers, FFS!!!!

Those "Project Funded By The EU" stickers, so beloved by the week of brane, (i.e. @skid2 and @Higgs_bosun ), won't produce themselves!!


A fecking hilarious, juvenile interpretation of the glorious 'co-eu funding' (read UK taxpayer in human speak).
You'd have to be a right spakker to interpret that as a good thing......there are a few about, roughly 16 million.
if the EU only donate €10 and some good will, you have to put up the ‘Funded by the magnanimity of the EU’ sticker.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Those "Project Funded By The EU" stickers, so beloved by the week of brane, (i.e. @skid2 and @Higgs_bosun ), won't produce themselves!!


A fecking hilarious, juvenile interpretation of the glorious 'co-eu funding' (read UK taxpayer in human speak).
You'd have to be a right spakker to interpret that as a good thing......there are a few about, roughly 16 million.
You are perhaps missing the key point here. We're a net contributor to the EU's structural funding - which money goes in part of improve other countries infrastructure. And helps their manufacturing and service industries become more competitive on the world stage.

I've got nothing against the Greeks, Bulgars, Poles and so on, but I do take exception to helping fund improvements in their infrastructure that helps them increase their industrial efficiency and - probably - costs British jobs as a consequence.

As I've posted before, paying into the EU's structural fund is akin to Manchester City partially funding Aston Villa to help them become more effective competitors in the Premiership.

Wordsmith
 
You are perhaps missing the key point here. We're a net contributor to the EU's structural funding - which money goes in part of improve other countries infrastructure. And helps their manufacturing and service industries become more competitive on the world stage.

I've got nothing against the Greeks, Bulgars, Poles and so on, but I do take exception to helping fund improvements in their infrastructure that helps them increase their industrial efficiency and - probably - costs British jobs as a consequence.

As I've posted before, paying into the EU's structural fund is akin to Manchester City partially funding Aston Villa to help them become more effective competitors in the Premiership.

Wordsmith

If it’s such a bad idea, it makes you wonder why China has invested so much in the Silk Road.
 
You are perhaps missing the key point here. We're a net contributor to the EU's structural funding - which money goes in part of improve other countries infrastructure. And helps their manufacturing and service industries become more competitive on the world stage.

I've got nothing against the Greeks, Bulgars, Poles and so on, but I do take exception to helping fund improvements in their infrastructure that helps them increase their industrial efficiency and - probably - costs British jobs as a consequence.

As I've posted before, paying into the EU's structural fund is akin to Manchester City partially funding Aston Villa to help them become more effective competitors in the Premiership.

Wordsmith
I'm struggling to see what key point I'm missing.
 
Brexit day plans are announced as Sajid Javid warns of the negative impact on some businesses as the UK diverges from EU rules.

An epic understatement... As we lapse into exploding kettles, cardboard wheels, toxic air fresheners, sawdust in bread and rely upon the African stolen bicycle industry for trade. Who needs rules anyway...? If the French don't like our straw filled mattresses and 500 volt shavers they can go to hell. If the krauts refuse to accept whitworth bolts and cast iron pistons why should we care? We can't afford their cars anyway!

Yes the penny is ready to drop.
 
Brexit day plans are announced as Sajid Javid warns of the negative impact on some businesses as the UK diverges from EU rules.

An epic understatement... As we lapse into exploding kettles, cardboard wheels, toxic air fresheners, sawdust in bread and rely upon the African stolen bicycle industry for trade. Who needs rules anyway...? If the French don't like our straw filled mattresses and 500 volt shavers they can go to hell. If the krauts refuse to accept whitworth bolts and cast iron pistons why should we care? We can't afford their cars anyway!

Yes the penny is ready to drop.
Still leaving.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Brexit day plans are announced as Sajid Javid warns of the negative impact on some businesses as the UK diverges from EU rules.

An epic understatement... As we lapse into exploding kettles, cardboard wheels, toxic air fresheners, sawdust in bread and rely upon the African stolen bicycle industry for trade. Who needs rules anyway...? If the French don't like our straw filled mattresses and 500 volt shavers they can go to hell. If the krauts refuse to accept whitworth bolts and cast iron pistons why should we care? We can't afford their cars anyway!

Yes the penny is ready to drop.
A recent photograph has emerged of Higgs_bosun.

1579382853490.png


It explains many of his posts...

Wordsmith
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm struggling to see what key point I'm missing.
That we've been financing the indirect improvement of other EU country's' manufacturing and services abilities via our contributions to the EU's structural funds. And by funding improvements in other EU countries, we've lost jobs as they've been better able to compete against us.


Wordsmith
 
We can't afford their cars anyway!

Yes the penny is ready to drop.
That would be those diesel cars with lying software?

In May 2017 a study in the journal Nature said "excess" emissions from diesel vehicles exceeding certification limits were associated with about 38,000 "premature" deaths globally in 2015.

Now researchers from Norway, Austria, Sweden and the Netherlands calculate that about 10,000 deaths in Europe per year can be attributed to small particle pollution from light duty diesel vehicles (LDDVs).

Almost half of these would have been avoided if emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from diesel cars on the road had matched levels measured in the lab.

If diesel cars emitted as little NOx as petrol ones, almost 4,000 of the 5,000 premature deaths would have been avoided, said the authors.

What were you saying?
 
It’s a bit more in-depth than that. You should read a book or two on it.
The Silk Road and other initiatives currently under way are simply a replication of what the British did to support the empire. Provide and protect lines of trade.

The Chinese have bought up vast mining and minerals interests in Australia, NOT to assist the Australian economy, but because they need to control them.

The artificial island military bases in the SCS are there to protect trade routes, as are the deals and support provided to Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, Kiribati etc, in a string stretching from China to Australia.

Unlike the EU none of this has been “free money” and has always been covered in conditions and caveats. China now owns much of Africa. There are 10,000 Chinese companies in Africa, and there are $20 billion in credit lines, $15 billion in grants, interest-free loans and concessional loans, and $10 billion in investment financing.

China is buying the world.

ASK YOURSELVES THIS:

HOW MUCH OF THE EU DOES THE UK OWN AFTER DECADES OF POURING MONEY IN???????
 
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