Brewing up

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
I don’t drink coffee. Tea all the way for me. Loose leaf either with one of those tea-egg strainers for single mugs, or made on a properly warmed China teapot.

Twinings Everyday is my preference - it is a blend but seems to be mostly Assam - or Twinings English Breakfast (hard to find in Scotland for some reason).

I also only use filtered water for making tea, as the filter removes the chemical taste of tap water. My cat won’t drink tap water but will happily quaff filtered. You can taste the difference between tap and filtered when making tea.
 
Yorkshire always odd times PG i was brought up on loose tea, my mug is stained on inside and rinsed never scrubbed as it adds to the flavour milk added last, wife drinks Gold Blend coffee two spoons per mug tiny bit of cold water first, minger.
 
I think Darjeeling has had a hard time in this thread.

I drink Darjeeling all the time, both tea bags and leaves. The taste is subtle rather than insipid.

The issue with any tea is that it becomes a totally different beverage when you stick milk in it. Christ knows where this habit came from because the (original) tea growing countries never put milk in it (the same applies to coffee). I worked with a woman who put milk in Earl Grey - the result was vile.

I stopped adding milk to tea and coffee in June 1974 when I went to work in the desert. Never used it since and never looked back.

Exploring teas can be interesting. It can also get very expensive with one Chinese tea costing about £500,000/pound (not a typing error). Gunpowder tea is good fun to watch as the little balls of tea unroll themselves (but apart from that is hardly worth the effort - unless you really like green tea).

Go black and never look back (coughs).
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
My reference to being an ex tankie:- I was referring to the WW2 "brewing up" of the Sherman tanks, which the boxheads called Tommy cookers, and the yanks called the " Ronson" as they had a tendency to light up instantly when hit. hence your distasteful comment.

that is the reason why I avoid the term. the lot I was on tour with chased a lad round the tank park (pre tour training) for saying 'brewing up'. I found them to less precious about it than the RE about 'fella' and the tankies know what brewing up means, the RE can't even decide why fella is offensive to them.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I think Darjeeling has had a hard time in this thread.

I drink Darjeeling all the time, both tea bags and leaves. The taste is subtle rather than insipid.

The issue with any tea is that it becomes a totally different beverage when you stick milk in it. Christ knows where this habit came from because the (original) tea growing countries never put milk in it (the same applies to coffee). I worked with a woman who put milk in Earl Grey - the result was vile.

I stopped adding milk to tea and coffee in June 1974 when I went to work in the desert. Never used it since and never looked back.

Exploring teas can be interesting. It can also get very expensive with one Chinese tea costing about £500,000/pound (not a typing error). Gunpowder tea is good fun to watch as the little balls of tea unroll themselves (but apart from that is hardly worth the effort - unless you really like green tea).

Go black and never look back (coughs).


the original tea cups in England couldn't cope with the heat of tea being put into them so milk* was added first to prevent the cups from cracking. later we discovered how to make better china


*water wasn't always safe to add with it being a bit full of deadly diseases. one of the reasons tea actually improved health at the time
 

Teeblerone

War Hero
Since having major brain surgery, I’ve had to ditch coffee and booze as they both give me horrendous headaches.

I’m now a confirmed tea drinker, Earl Grey being my brew of choice. There is also a local Cumbrian brand that I’m quite fond of, but their bags are weak as **** and I’m experiencing at least a 50% breakage rate.

The wife bought me posh set of Indian teas a few months back. Loads of different ones including one with Turmeric and another with Cardamom.

All good stuff.

I quite fancy one of those teapots with the separate compartment for leaves. Anyone got one?
Yep, an older Bodum one with a central 'core tube' that sits through the lid. Fascinating watching it brew through the clear glass body and you can pull the core out when it's sufficiently brewed.
Only disadvantages: family sized, not great for a single mug; cools down quickly.
A 700ml one would be great (200ml core, 500ml liquid).

Mine is the 'Bistro' one; smaller are available
 
Yorkshire always odd times PG i was brought up on loose tea, my mug is stained on inside and rinsed never scrubbed as it adds to the flavour milk added last, wife drinks Gold Blend coffee two spoons per mug tiny bit of cold water first, minger.
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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Taylors English breakfast loose tea at home, only use filtered water though, make a hell of a difference to the taste and colour.
At work or out & about I use Yorkshire Tea bags - the two cup ones meant for small pots in cafes etc. Yorkshire tea is blended to match the water where it will be sold so buying online may give you a different taste to buying locally, even though its the same packet.
 
Coffee tastes like mud.

Not surprising as it was ground not long ago.
 

Aphra

Swinger
Yep, an older Bodum one with a central 'core tube' that sits through the lid. Fascinating watching it brew through the clear glass body and you can pull the core out when it's sufficiently brewed.
Only disadvantages: family sized, not great for a single mug; cools down quickly.
A 700ml one would be great (200ml core, 500ml liquid).

Mine is the 'Bistro' one; smaller are available
Yes, I've got one of those, but I just press the plunger down when the tea's brewed to my liking. That also enables the use of a tea cosy to keep the contents of the pot hot for quite a while. The central core does get stained but as detailed up-thread, overnight soaking in a soda crystals/boiling water solution sorts that.
 
Reminds me of an article read a few years ago about tea auction houses. What surprised me was that the French purchased all the higher quality teas, whereas the English companies went for cheap bulk teas. Has anyone drank French tea?

I fear that tea might be going the same way as marmalade. Fewer people are interested in it.

Nope. Apparently tea houses are very trendy in France. Froggie colleague waxes lyrical about it and pays stupid money for some of the stuff he brings to taste. I take the piss telling him it had to have been picked by left handed virgins at dawn on the summer solstice on the east facing slope of a Himalayan foothill to warrant 20 Euros for 30g of leaves. Utterly appalled when I lob in a dash of milk and dip a rusk in it.

There are a couple of good brands but the one I can recall offhand is Mariage Freres.
 
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Irrespective of the committed alcoholics on this forum and the filthy perverts who 'only drink coffee', what is your tea of choice?

For years, I was suckered into the 'convenience' of teabags, but a couple of years back I decided to give loose leaf a try after a very long hiatus.

What a revelation! It really is so much better.

If you're just making a brew for yourself, there's no need to go through the entire Japanese tea ceremony. You can get these little gadgets on Amazon that enable the making of one cup at a time. Just as convenient as teabags but an overwhelmingly better result. Brewing in a pot is better yet.

Supermarket shelves aren't exactly bowing in the middle with the varieties of loose leaf tea, but there are usually two or three. I think the type I go for mostly is some kind of breakfast tea, which makes the cup of gunfire I most like. I have occasional forays into the kinky section; Lapsang Souchong and Earl Grey are a nice change. I'll have to go further afield than supermarkets to broaden the scope, I think.

I most recently tried Darjeeling. Subtle is not the word. The coarse strands indicated to me that it might be quite a robust brew. How wrong I was. No matter how long I let it infuse, I just ended up with something very weak and insipid. Is it supposed to be like that? I was a bit disappointed, to be honest. I just gave up with it in the end and tipped it in the caddy with something more to my taste.

Anyone else giving teabags a miss?
Thank you @Provost, great topic.

I was a dedicated Yorkshire tea bag drinker for the past 15 years but since Brexit has put paid to shipping it to Spain, I´ve had to look elsewhere for my tea fix. Found an Indian supermarket in Madrid and bought 1kg of Brook Bond loose tea. Bloody great. I used to put tea bags in the pot but the second serving was always a bit wishy washy. No such problems with loose tea which refreshes to the same arse kicking strength for the second serving.

I was similarly caught short in Saudi Arabia for a couple of years and found that Liptons loose tea was really good, better flavour than the Brook Bond but I´ve not been able to find it here.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I like loose leaf tea, made in a teapot. Because I'm a tightarse, I'm currently drinking Tesco loose leaf Gold Tea :)
 

Mattb

LE
Irrespective of the committed alcoholics on this forum and the filthy perverts who 'only drink coffee', what is your tea of choice?

For years, I was suckered into the 'convenience' of teabags, but a couple of years back I decided to give loose leaf a try after a very long hiatus.

What a revelation! It really is so much better.

If you're just making a brew for yourself, there's no need to go through the entire Japanese tea ceremony. You can get these little gadgets on Amazon that enable the making of one cup at a time. Just as convenient as teabags but an overwhelmingly better result. Brewing in a pot is better yet.

Supermarket shelves aren't exactly bowing in the middle with the varieties of loose leaf tea, but there are usually two or three. I think the type I go for mostly is some kind of breakfast tea, which makes the cup of gunfire I most like. I have occasional forays into the kinky section; Lapsang Souchong and Earl Grey are a nice change. I'll have to go further afield than supermarkets to broaden the scope, I think.

I most recently tried Darjeeling. Subtle is not the word. The coarse strands indicated to me that it might be quite a robust brew. How wrong I was. No matter how long I let it infuse, I just ended up with something very weak and insipid. Is it supposed to be like that? I was a bit disappointed, to be honest. I just gave up with it in the end and tipped it in the caddy with something more to my taste.

Anyone else giving teabags a miss?
To be honest, I only started drinking tea because a pretty normal cup of tea (made with a bag) is pretty much indistinguishable from my point of view to a really good one; whereas instant coffee tastes utterly terrible.
 
I don't think it has to be an either/or thing with tea and coffee. I like both. I'm more likely to guzzle at tea but just have the occasional coffee. I have to say that cafetiere coffee is a complete waste of time. I've never had a convincing coffee out of one of those things, made by myself or anyone else.

I think that when out and about, the coffee in Holland takes some beating. It tastes about as good as it smells, which is a rarity. They're quite big on tea there, as well, but it's generally those poncey teabags with tags and glass cups.

Green (jasmine) tea is fine with a Chinese meal, but severely wanting most other times. Fruit teas and infusions are a waste of time as far as I can see.

I sometimes put ginger or cardamom in with tea. You either like it or you don't.
 

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