Brewing up

Christ you went out of your way to be vicariously offended. It is a common expression.
Not at all, i was concerned that the original comment was reference to tanks brewing up, and as an ex tankie, i thought it might be offensive, i had no thoughts of being offensive or discourteous. I do apologize if it seemed that way. no offence intended.:confused:
 
Something that really pisses me off is when you are in a caff or restaurant (usually the cheaper variety) and they serve you teabag tea without a separate saucer or some kind of receptacle to put your used teabag.

I make a point of leaving it on the table top (where the tip might otherwise have been).
 
Another thing about loose leaf v. tea bag.

If you take , for example, a Twinings tea bag of Earl Gray , tear it open and then compare the contents with the same stuff - but sold as loose leaf - you will immediately see a distinct difference.

This reflects in a flavour difference.
When tea bags started to become popular in UK (60s) we used to say that they were filled with the sweepings from the floor of tea packing companies. The contents of a bag are almost powder.
 
Something that really pisses me off is when you are in a caff or restaurant (usually the cheaper variety) and they serve you teabag tea without a separate saucer or some kind of receptacle to put your used teabag.

I make a point of leaving it on the table top (where the tip might otherwise have been).
WHY?
 
Since having major brain surgery, I’ve had to ditch coffee and booze as they both give me horrendous headaches.

I’m now a confirmed tea drinker, Earl Grey being my brew of choice. There is also a local Cumbrian brand that I’m quite fond of, but their bags are weak as **** and I’m experiencing at least a 50% breakage rate.

The wife bought me posh set of Indian teas a few months back. Loads of different ones including one with Turmeric and another with Cardamom.

All good stuff.

I quite fancy one of those teapots with the separate compartment for leaves. Anyone got one?
Not sure how far it is from you, but try this place next time you're near Kendal:


Nice old shop - I pop in whenever I visit the folks, who are nearby.
 
I can only drink tea I make myself as no-one makes it strong enough for my liking. Marks and Spencer strong teabags is my current choice. But there is a Northern Ireland brand, Barry's that is quite good too.

There is a thing for British regional tea because of the local water supply is either soft or hard and it has an effect on the tea flavour.
Barry's is actually from Cork. The Northern Ireland brand of tea I remember from my youth was Punjana, not sure if it's still made, it came in an orange box with black lettering, it had a catchy jingle for the ads on TV "pick Punjana tea, pick Punjana tea, savour the flavour, big tea flavour..." oh well, you had to be there.

Now for me it's Lipton's Yellow Label, can't beat it.

ETA: Professor Google strikes again here's the old Punjana box, "Broken Orange Pekoe" I always remember that, no idea what it meant.

1620128610303.png
 
Another thing about loose leaf v. tea bag.

If you take , for example, a Twinings tea bag of Earl Gray , tear it open and then compare the contents with the same stuff - but sold as loose leaf - you will immediately see a distinct difference.

This reflects in a flavour difference.

Called “Fannings”. Often referred to as the sweepings off the floor, but it’s the same tea, either left over from processing the higher grades, or increasingly cut like that for the huge tea bag market, because the flavour infuses faster. Source: the guide doing the tour at a tea plantation in Sri Lanka. Theory is that if customers are using tea bags they are probably less interested in obtaining the best flavour and just want a quick strong cup.
 
The Northern Ireland brand of tea I remember from my youth was Punjana, not sure if it's still made, it came in an orange box with black lettering, it had a catchy jingle for the ads on TV "pick Punjana tea, pick Punjana tea, savour the flavour, big tea flavour..." oh well, you had to be there.
We probably were.
 
Teapigs everyday loose leaf or the teabags at a push.
Reminds me of an article read a few years ago about tea auction houses. What surprised me was that the French purchased all the higher quality teas, whereas the English companies went for cheap bulk teas. Has anyone drank French tea?
 
it had a catchy jingle for the ads on TV "pick Punjana tea, pick Punjana tea, savour the flavour, big tea flavour..."
Not as catchy as:

Coo-ee Mr Shifter, light refreshments

Dad, do you know the piano's on my foot?

You hum it, son, and I'll play it

Avez vous un cuppa?

Ah oui Cherie, le premier thé anglais

Etc.
 
Reminds me of an article read a few years ago about tea auction houses. What surprised me was that the French purchased all the higher quality teas, whereas the English companies went for cheap bulk teas. Has anyone drank French tea?

Continentals are a little more prissy about tea (which makes their almost universal use of the teabag somewhat strange). They hardly ever take it with milk unless they've spent some time in Blighty.

I think we prefer tea of the more 'gargling' variety for every day purposes.
 
Continentals are a little more prissy about tea (which makes their almost universal use of the teabag somewhat strange). They hardly ever take it with milk unless they've spent some time in Blighty.

I think we prefer tea of the more 'gargling' variety for every day purposes.
On a school exchange to Germany, I took some PG as a gift for the family. The dad's response was along the lines of "Donner und Blitzen*, no vunder ve lost ze vor!". Or Schwabisch words to that effect.

The two bottles of Newcastle Brown elicited a similar response.


* Other reindeer names are available.
 

Whining Civvy

War Hero
I had no idea that there were so many conny connar conneis ponces on arrse.

Tea is tea, drink it or deport yourself.

(English breakfast, by the way, because I is a sophistimacated gent)


{edit: I found myself in Darjeeling once, there's a proper old-style shop with a hundred different types of loose leaf tea blends from various local tea plantations. We bought some samples at random, not being the type of wa**er who takes it all seriously, and tried it all when we got home. It was uniformly awful. I can only assume that my tastes have been ruined by proper British tea}
 
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When I was a nipper, one of the street tradesmen was the tea man. Always wore a shop coat and a trilby hat and turned up in a blue Morris van. That's what he sold; packet tea. I think he did packets of biscuits as well.

There must have been some serious amounts of tea being necked in those days to make it worth his while.
 

ACAB

LE
Whilst working abroad my tipple of choice was "Twinings Extra Strong".

The missus used to post it out to me, it's delish!!!
 

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