Brewing up

I spent a long time on leaf tea - it was a long time ago and easier to find in the supermarkets without paying organic/artisan prices. My favourites were Assam and Darjeeling but the standard PG Tips/Typhoo was also there in loose packs - don't see that any more. Lucky visitors to my humble portacabin often said they could taste the difference.

Now I'm a lazy no-mates it's Yorkshire or Yorkshire Gold in bags.
 
I gave up properly drinking Tea in the middle 90's, reverted to Coffee and have been a bit of a coffee snob ever since.

However on hols in Somerset last year, we stayed in Porlock and drank the local brew. It was fantastic and reminded me of Tea of old. We bought some from source and now it's the families favourite brew.

5 mins in a warmed ceramic pot, and it's proper amber nectar, not that Aussie beer piss

Miles West Country Original

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Irrespective of the committed alcoholics on this forum and the filthy perverts who 'only drink coffee', what is your tea of choice?

For years, I was suckered into the 'convenience' of teabags, but a couple of years back I decided to give loose leaf a try after a very long hiatus.

What a revelation! It really is so much better.

If you're just making a brew for yourself, there's no need to go through the entire Japanese tea ceremony. You can get these little gadgets on Amazon that enable the making of one cup at a time. Just as convenient as teabags but an overwhelmingly better result. Brewing in a pot is better yet.

Supermarket shelves aren't exactly bowing in the middle with the varieties of loose leaf tea, but there are usually two or three. I think the type I go for mostly is some kind of breakfast tea, which makes the cup of gunfire I most like. I have occasional forays into the kinky section; Lapsang Souchong and Earl Grey are a nice change. I'll have to go further afield than supermarkets to broaden the scope, I think.

I most recently tried Darjeeling. Subtle is not the word. The coarse strands indicated to me that it might be quite a robust brew. How wrong I was. No matter how long I let it infuse, I just ended up with something very weak and insipid. Is it supposed to be like that? I was a bit disappointed, to be honest. I just gave up with it in the end and tipped it in the caddy with something more to my taste.

Anyone else giving teabags a miss?
Waitrose usually have a decent range of leaf teas, own brand. Work your way through until you find two or three varieties that suit you. From what I gather of your tastes (in tea !) from what you have written, I think you may enjoy Kenya, good robust flavour and a satisfying bronze colour.
Tesco does an own brand in their premium range.
Yorkshire Gold is a blend, but still quite nice.
Darjeeling is, as you say, weak and insipid, but if you ever have the urge to drink tea black, with a lemon slice, it goes down well.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Ex tankie?


started a tour with one lot, worked with them a few times although I spent way more time with the planks and cloud punchers
 
I spent a long time on leaf tea - it was a long time ago and easier to find in the supermarkets without paying organic/artisan prices. My favourites were Assam and Darjeeling but the standard PG Tips/Typhoo was also there in loose packs - don't see that any more. Lucky visitors to my humble portacabin often said they could taste the difference.

Now I'm a lazy no-mates it's Yorkshire or Yorkshire Gold in bags.
Loose leaf PG tips, in 250g boxes can be obtained from the larger Sainsburys for £2 . Mrs Sig gets 5 boxes a month.
 
Another thing about loose leaf v. tea bag.

If you take , for example, a Twinings tea bag of Earl Gray , tear it open and then compare the contents with the same stuff - but sold as loose leaf - you will immediately see a distinct difference.

This reflects in a flavour difference.
The thing with Earl Grey is that it is weak as a tea and too strong with the bergamot. Persian tea is the opposite, strong with mild hint of bergamot
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Since having major brain surgery, I’ve had to ditch coffee and booze as they both give me horrendous headaches.

I’m now a confirmed tea drinker, Earl Grey being my brew of choice. There is also a local Cumbrian brand that I’m quite fond of, but their bags are weak as **** and I’m experiencing at least a 50% breakage rate.

The wife bought me posh set of Indian teas a few months back. Loads of different ones including one with Turmeric and another with Cardamom.

All good stuff.

I quite fancy one of those teapots with the separate compartment for leaves. Anyone got one?
 
The thing with Earl Grey is that it is weak as a tea and too strong with the bergamot. Persian tea is the opposite, strong with mild hint of bergamot
A bag of Earl Grey and a bag of ordinary tea in a pot takes the edge off and gives a more subtle flavour.

ETA - Provost does the same!
 
started a tour with one lot, worked with them a few times although I spent way more time with the planks and cloud punchers
My reference to being an ex tankie:- I was referring to the WW2 "brewing up" of the Sherman tanks, which the boxheads called Tommy cookers, and the yanks called the " Ronson" as they had a tendency to light up instantly when hit. hence your distasteful comment.
 
I use something similar when making a single cup/mug, but it's more spherical and spring-loaded. I've learned not to pack it full of tea as when the tea comes into contact with the water it swells up and the brew does not circulate and you end up with something weaker than if you had just put in half the amount.

I've got a thing like an egg on a chain, there's a little hook to go on the edge of the mug. A bit of a fiddle really, I prefer to use the traditional brown china pot - I've got a few sizes.
 
giving teabags a miss?
No, not at all; a teabag is very simple to use, doesn't involve multiple implements to brew and is quickly chucked, unlike loose-leaf. However, for a large mug in the afternoon, loose-leaf Assam, brewed to treacly consistency with condensed milk, is equal to a good coffee.
 
Waitrose usually have a decent range of leaf teas, own brand. Work your way through until you find two or three varieties that suit you. From what I gather of your tastes (in tea !) from what you have written, I think you may enjoy Kenya, good robust flavour and a satisfying bronze colour.
Tesco does an own brand in their premium range.
Yorkshire Gold is a blend, but still quite nice.
Darjeeling is, as you say, weak and insipid, but if you ever have the urge to drink tea black, with a lemon slice, it goes down well.
For preference, I'd go with Yorkshire or Builders' but for the best economy/quality mix, PG is hard to beat - 4x 240 bags at Farm Foods for £10 is a typical offer (sometimes varies but it's always around there). The tea doesn't know which shop it's being sold in.

My golden rule is tea in UK, coffee elsewhere. Leaf is best but a faff. If you learn how to make it, and it takes patience to get the measure just right, Instant PG is also good.
 
I've got a thing like an egg on a chain, there's a little hook to go on the edge of the mug. A bit of a fiddle really, I prefer to use the traditional brown china pot - I've got a few sizes.
An infuser. Known in Germany as a Tee-Ei (tea egg).

Also available as a version that resembles a tea spoon with a hinged lid.

Bodum also make a teapot with a built-in infuser.
 
No, not at all; a teabag is very simple to use, doesn't involve multiple implements to brew and is quickly chucked, unlike loose-leaf. However, for a large mug in the afternoon, loose-leaf Assam, brewed to treacly consistency with condensed milk, is equal to a good coffee.

These things are no fiddle at all. You can use them one-handed (if you're having a wânk, or something).

Less agg than a teabag, if anything.

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My reference to being an ex tankie:- I was referring to the WW2 "brewing up" of the Sherman tanks, which the boxheads called Tommy cookers, and the yanks called the " Ronson" as they had a tendency to light up instantly when hit. hence your distasteful comment.
Christ you went out of your way to be vicariously offended. It is a common expression.
 

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