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Bren LMG Aiming

#1
Probably best suited to the old and Bold - but how did one go about aiming the Bren LMG, since the magazine was above the barrel and hence obscuring the target from the shooter?

P_T
 
#3
Probably best suited to the old and Bold - but how did one go about aiming the Bren LMG, since the magazine was above the barrel and hence obscuring the target from the shooter?

P_T
1)point in rough direction
2)squeeze trigger until mag empty
3)lift head up to see if target hit OR

use the slightly offset sights fitted
 
#8
was 3 years into rct service before i even SAW a gpmg-lmg brings back memories-along with charlie gs the most unpopular item given to any driver!! couldnt wait to be a section commander and get gods gift of the small metal gun !!
 
#9
As a Trucker in the 1970's (RCT) I wondered why a platoon weapon such as the LMG, even needed sights, as given its mission to spray the enemy with enough brass-wear to keep there heads down, in theory all you had to do was point the thing in the eright direction. At the time we used to use the LMG just like any other weapon that we trained on [SLR, SMG, Browning 9mm, Carl Gustaf] at the ranges single shot.
Later on I was told that the only weapon that is used on automatic was the GMPG, as the British Army had to make each round count due to cost. Back then for a corps man, our annual entitlement to rounds was limited to 5 for the annual shooting test.

So on range day, the LMG was set to single shot and that was it.

Later on at an Air Gunner course at Mannobeer [sorry about the spelling] in Wales, we used a lot more ammo to shoot at the windsock, but only in bursts of 3.
 
#10
Because of the overhead magazine, the sight line is offset to the left, and the front sight is mounted on a base which protrudes upward and to the left from the gas block.

http://http://world.guns.ru/machine/brit/bren-e.html

Err, no, the front sight is attached to the individual barrel. For what its worth this means that the barrel can be sighted in. The Italian WWII LMG, Breda? had both front and rear sights on the body of the gun, so if the quick change barrel was skewed, the innacuracy was pretty much uncorrectable.

The Bren was very accurate indeed, some said too accurate for a weapon meant to give a 'beaten area' of fire, rather than take out individual targets. The GPMG gives a bigger footfall of rounds so denying an area to enemy troops.
 
#11
As a Trucker in the 1970's (RCT) I wondered why a platoon weapon such as the LMG, even needed sights, as given its mission to spray the enemy with enough brass-wear to keep there heads down, in theory all you had to do was point the thing in the eright direction. At the time we used to use the LMG just like any other weapon that we trained on [SLR, SMG, Browning 9mm, Carl Gustaf] at the ranges single shot.
Later on I was told that the only weapon that is used on automatic was the GMPG, as the British Army had to make each round count due to cost. Back then for a corps man, our annual entitlement to rounds was limited to 5 for the annual shooting test.

So on range day, the LMG was set to single shot and that was it.

Later on at an Air Gunner course at Mannobeer [sorry about the spelling] in Wales, we used a lot more ammo to shoot at the windsock, but only in bursts of 3.
+ did you ever try getting out of a stally cupola with a lmg-at night- piss wet through- in a german forest with overhanging pine trees and camo nets to contend with--fcking nightmare !!
 
#12
The Bren was very accurate indeed, some said too accurate for a weapon meant to give a 'beaten area' of fire, rather than take out individual targets. The GPMG gives a bigger footfall of rounds so denying an area to enemy troops.
And completely unsuited to singing 'die mother fcuka, die' to.
 
#17
#20
CIMG1224.jpg

Very accurate, remember to watch the 'swirrrl' as the round goes down range, rising and falling into the target. I've told it before, but here it is again:

Section match at Altcar in 1976ish. Fired the first practice at 600m, picked up LMG to run down to 500, caught my boot DMS in the sling which snagged on the barrel locking handle and the gun fell into 2 pieces. Red arse!
 

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