Bread maker

#1
I have recently purchased a bread maker, I was a bit sceptical at first but after the first month I am a complete convert. I can control the additives but particularly the salt. It was the amount of salt in shop brought bread that first put on to the idea. The other thing is the smell of fresh bread in the morning. It also produces great pizza dough. I am now moving on to more exotic breads, any arrsers got any good recipes.
 
#2
Bernster said:
I have recently purchased a bread maker, I was a bit sceptical at first but after the first month I am a complete convert. I can control the additives but particularly the salt. It was the amount of salt in shop brought bread that first put on to the idea. The other thing is the smell of fresh bread in the morning. It also produces great pizza dough. I am now moving on to more exotic breads, any arrsers got any good recipes.

I will dig out my book of bread recipes, but in all honesty, this is one of the best buys you could make, home made bread is something you will keep on doing.
Apart from the smell, the taste is like bread of the old days, when it was real fresh bread and not filled with so many additives to make its shelf life longer.

Enjoy.
 
#3
Mrs BR bought a one four weeks ago and she has yet to make a loaf . I have made every one and its easy peasy ... the resulting bread is magnificent ... the smell ... the crust . Just baked a Mixed Grain ... on a cooling tray now . Some for supper tonight . Did not believe her when she said it was easy to use .
My gosh .... I have just come out ... I am no longer a closet breadmaker !
 
#4
Now, we have to have a looky here.
Do you mean making bread with the assistance of a machine, or using a machine with the assistance of that farkin aweful bread machine mix bollocks?

P.S Make bread by hand you bloody gimp, far better results :D
 
#5
GrizzlyPanda said:
Now, we have to have a looky here.
Do you mean making bread with the assistance of a machine, or using a machine with the assistance of that farkin aweful bread machine mix balls?

P.S Make bread by hand you bloody gimp, far better results :D
It may be better hand-made (I'd still use an oven to cook it though, saves time) but it's so much easier by machine. pop in the ingredients, set the timer, get up in the morning with the house smelling of fresh bread.

Simple things, like adding an egg to the mix make it nicer too, just remember to keep the ratio of dry* ingredients to wet the same and you can't go wrong.

*forget the sugar though, it only makes a harder crust; if you want a sweeter taste, add some honey.
 
#6
I make all my own bread.

I have a rather good mixer that I use but I don't have a "bread machine"

White bread:

2 tsp sugar
12 fl oz warm water
1 tsp yeast.


(Make this up first)

1 oz butter
20 oz strong bread flour
Pinch salt

(If brown bread - add some honey to the yeast.)

I find that allowing the first and second proving to take place fairly slowly makes for the best loaf.


"instant yeast", "fast acting yeast" etc is crap - get proper dried yeast and reconstitute it as described above.
 
#10
So have we, it's great. The missus would never make bread by hand, neither would I. Three kids and me to look after. The machine does a grand job.
But having said that, she goes half-way and gets the machine to do the mixing (which is pretty flawless) then she usually knocks it out into bread rolls rather than leave it to cook as a loaf.
And the pizza dough is to die for.

Can we stop talking about fresh bread? I'm slavvering here... :drool:
 
#11
BarkingSpider said:
So have we, it's great. The missus would never make bread by hand, neither would I. Three kids and me to look after. The machine does a grand job.
But having said that, she goes half-way and gets the machine to do the mixing (which is pretty flawless) then she usually knocks one out into bread rolls rather than leave it to cook as a loaf.
And the pizza dough is to die for.

Can we stop talking about fresh bread? I'm slavvering here... :drool:
My bold (and italics), I would have thought that was your job and an ingredient too far! 8O
 
#13
I make my bread by hand, I found that the paddle in the bread maker causes a void in finished bread, but hand made is much more flexible bigger or smaller loaf depending on the needs at that time and bread rolls for others. The bread machine is ok but never beat hand made
 
#14
EX_STAB said:
I have this mixer which makes brilliant dough and can of course be used for many other jobs too. I have a mince grinder and sausage maker for it too - made venison sausages. mmmmmm :)




Good price on in it here:

http://www.cs-catering-equipment.co...ercial-mixer/kitchenaid-mixer-k5pm5/p_82.html

Might look expensive but it's very solidly built and really WILL last a lifetime so good value in the long run.
Same mixer,sent to the States for a slightly different Dough hook. Got a Bread Maker,it's gone to Charridy. Can't beat hand made,good tip,put your dough in the top of the fridge for first prove,overnight is great.

The difference in taste between hand-made and Bread Maker,is amazing,got some old breadmaking books of ebay,never looked back.
 
#15
My mate has a fairly elaborate system of bird-feeders in her garden and enjoys watching the variety of birds from her conservatory.

Two or three years ago, she was given a bread-maker for Xmas. (I'm not sure she uses it any longer.) When it was new, she often made bread in her machine. I was staying with her and she had made some bread. We ate some of the bread with our supper on the day I arrived and she had some saved for breakfast.

After taking the dogs out in the morning, she looked in the bread-bin for the bread for breakfast. It was gone. She went to confront her (then 18 year old) son in his bedroom. Yes, he had taken the home-made bread. He had crumbled it up and thrown it on to the garage roof, as bait for the birds, so he could shoot them with his BB gun. :omg:
 
#16
Sorry Chaps, I don't agree. My machie is shoite. I have made two loads of 'bread' one turned out to be most dense material known to man and the other turned out to be the second most dense material known to man.

Its probably down to me not being careful enough with my measurements! :oops:
 
#17
LARD said:
Sorry Chaps, I don't agree. My machie is shoite. I have made two loads of 'bread' one turned out to be most dense material known to man and the other turned out to be the second most dense material known to man.

Its probably down to me not being careful enough with my measurements! :oops:
The measurements aren't all that critical. Yeast is pretty critical and so is proving time. Buy this dried yeast:

http://www.herbsgardenshealth.com/Baking,_Sugar,_Sweeteners_files/Allinson_Dried_Yeast.htm

Follow the quantities I gave earlier.

Add the sugar to the warm water. Whisk it up. I add some honey at this stage if making brown bread. Add the yeast to it, Whisk it again. Leave to stand somewhere warm until it is frothy.

Rub the butter into the flour. Add the salt.

When the yeast has got a foaming head on it, whisk it back up again and add to the flour. Knead by hand - you just need to keep at it for a good five minutes. Let it prove for a couple of hours somewhere just warm, airing cupboard etc - top oven is a bit hot I reckon. Best I've found is a kitchen cupboard next to the one that has my boiler in it.

Knock it back and knead it again for five minutes. Time yourself - don't cheat! Shape into two round loaves. place on greased baking tray. Allow to prove again for an hour or two until they've visibly "grown".

Bake for 30 minutes at 200 deg. C.

I usually make two tin loaves when making white. If you use a tin, make sure it is greased with lard. Press the dough well into the corners. It should about half fill the tin. It's easier with a tin to see when it has risen enough - it will be obviously loaf shaped sticking out of the top.

Give it a go - you'll crack it. :)
 
#18
EX_STAB said:
I have this mixer which makes brilliant dough and can of course be used for many other jobs too. I have a mince grinder and sausage maker for it too - made venison sausages. mmmmmm :)




Good price on in it here:

http://www.cs-catering-equipment.co...ercial-mixer/kitchenaid-mixer-k5pm5/p_82.html

Might look expensive but it's very solidly built and really WILL last a lifetime so good value in the long run.
Interesting, that's the very same model we have in our unit kitchen. I agree with the build quality, very solid and will last you a lifetime.
 
#19
I leave the Bread Department to Mrs B-S, who is now on her 2nd Panasonic Bread-Maker [the ONLY one to buy, lasted about 10 years and was still "S" when replaced by a newer model]. I would describe her as an expert in this field.

Her recommended book is The Breadmaker Bible, by Karen Saunders. Ebury Press. Avaialble From Amazon.

She advises that the balance of quantities is CRITICAL - exact measurement only, which is why I'm banned from the kitchen when she's doing bread in case I distract her.

One loaf lasts 3 days - first day fresh, then 2 as toast.

If anyone really wants more info, I'll get her to post a few recipes.
 
#20
blue-sophist said:
I leave the Bread Department to Mrs B-S, who is now on her 2nd Panasonic Bread-Maker [the ONLY one to buy, lasted about 10 years and was still "S" when replaced by a newer model]. I would describe her as an expert in this field.
I've just (out of curiosity) Googled Panasonic breadmaker. It seems to come up with the two very similar models: SD254 and SD255. To clarify, and without lots of fuss, are those the models to which you refer, BS?

http://www.chrisrand.com/panasonic-SD255-breadmaker-bread-maker/
 

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