Boris wields the sword-maybe!

I have a suspicion that he's not been 100% content for some time, constantly fire-fighting, subject of much negative briefing and then, Bang! hit by COVID-19. He knows that he can step comfortably into some non-executive directorships, enjoy his fellowship (non-stipendary) at an Oxford college, and possibly even becoming the head of one of the colleges before too long. So, upon returning, from his convalescence to find he's fire-fighting, subject of much negative briefing and.... he's decided '**** it' and gone.

But he's exacted a peerage and the global economic security job as his golden goodbye.
He's a strange choice for the latter golden goodbye role...

I don't blame him for going, he has been out-of-step with the new regime from the get go.
 
He's a strange choice for the latter golden goodbye role...

I don't blame him for going, he has been out-of-step with the new regime from the get go.
He's not the most obvious choice, which makes me wonder if it falls into the 'name the bauble you would also like' category. I'm not sure the PM would've immediately thought of his Cabinet Secretary and National Security Advisor for that job....
 
He's not the most obvious choice, which makes me wonder if it falls into the 'name the bauble you would also like' category. I'm not sure the PM would've immediately thought of his Cabinet Secretary and National Security Advisor for that job....
An alternative explanation is that the role was up for grabs and he was 'steered' towards it i.e. a suitably crunchy job away from Whitehall before becoming head of an Oxbridge College.
 
The vast majority of the CS are apolitical. The trouble is that the vast majority do not get to pull the levers and press the buttons.
Indeed my ire is not with those who are not part of, pulling levers and pressing buttons. Also it is not with the many who work there socks off, to make the many stupid and ineffectual systems work day today, and that help keeps the wheels on so many departments. They do such despite there being no personal benefit be it financial or reflected in decent personal staff reports, but because they see the importance of making things work for all.

Many of us here have direct experience with both the good and the bad, within the institutions, and I believe most of us can distinguish between, when the Government of the Day are producing moronic policy that with the best will in the world is doomed too failure, and when the CS goes rogue, and obstructionist.

While it is easy for me and others to say particularly when its not our own pension etc. That surly it's sign of personal integrity or lack of when those in the higher echelons, who find they cannot agree with or follow a policy, then they should resign.

I know that integrity is considered old fashioned these days, but I believe it is an important societal virtue. From my family up-bring, Military service and time spent in the Civil Service it was always seen as an important character trait both from my superiors and subordinates.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I think a book by Mark Sedwill in the near future could be a load of old wibble
fixed that for you.

that will be a one pound woolworths record voucher please
 
But he's exacted a peerage and the global economic security job as his golden goodbye.
So, a six figure pension, another highly paid job, plus a place at the best Care Home in the country with £300 a day thrown in. Whats not to like. Unless you are a tax payer that is.
 
An alternative explanation is that the role was up for grabs and he was 'steered' towards it i.e. a suitably crunchy job away from Whitehall before becoming head of an Oxbridge College.
Entirely possible - not sure how much of an 'easily-steered' sort of man he is? Unless something dramatic changes, he won't get his old Oxford college (he was a postgrad) soon, but there are a couple of other places where the head of house is likely to be moving on (he's probably too late for the vacancy at Worcester).
 
Entirely possible - not sure how much of an 'easily-steered' sort of man he is? Unless something dramatic changes, he won't get his old Oxford college (he was a postgrad) soon, but there are a couple of other places where the head of house is likely to be moving on (he's probably too late for the vacancy at Worcester).
I agree about your 'easily led' point, but that rather depends upon what they i.e. Johnson and Cummings, have got on him. The point is that he is effectively stepping down early and has been given a couple of consolation prizes in exchange for going quietly. Not a terribly edifying spectacle, tbh.
 
Indeed my ire is not with those who are not part of, pulling levers and pressing buttons. Also it is not with the many who work there socks off, to make the many stupid and ineffectual systems work day today, and that help keeps the wheels on so many departments. They do such despite there being no personal benefit be it financial or reflected in decent personal staff reports, but because they see the importance of making things work for all.

Many of us here have direct experience with both the good and the bad, within the institutions, and I believe most of us can distinguish between, when the Government of the Day are producing moronic policy that with the best will in the world is doomed too failure, and when the CS goes rogue, and obstructionist.

While it is easy for me and others to say particularly when its not our own pension etc. That surly it's sign of personal integrity or lack of when those in the higher echelons, who find they cannot agree with or follow a policy, then they should resign.

I know that integrity is considered old fashioned these days, but I believe it is an important societal virtue. From my family up-bring, Military service and time spent in the Civil Service it was always seen as an important character trait both from my superiors and subordinates.
Blair simply promoted the politically minded and demoted the apolitical, to the extent that including brown and cameron/coalition, we've had that the soft left leaning CS ruling class in charge for 20+ years. Sacking off the CS boss is a hopeful sign, that the government is finally finding its feet and a small hope that the government is thinking of an effective reboot post-Brexit, where suddenly a lot of things change at once.
 
What do you do when the CS have undermined the government and the population?
A very big and loud reminder of what they are they are there for:

'' To support the Government and implement Government Policy ''

Then starting from the top, start to Mag to Grid every single one of them that appears to have a problem with that concept.
 
I suspect many of us would agree with your opening statement but have highlighted the word in bold, that I think many of us also now find this not to be no longer the case and is a sad indictment of the current Civil Service.

"I seem to remember the UK priding itself on the fact that the CS was apolitical and provided continuity and a 'steady hand' no matter the flavour or experience level of the government."

edit diction
Yes, as opposed to the sock that's sole 'contribution' to the thread has been the single click of a mouse button. To plagarise that astute political commentator, Neil Young, regarding the apolitical integrity of the CS senior leadership, 'And once you're gone, you can never come back'.

Capture.PNG
 
So, a six figure pension, another highly paid job, plus a place at the best Care Home in the country with £300 a day thrown in. Whats not to like. Unless you are a tax payer that is.
Even when they don't like each other, the 'establishment club' tends to look after its own, which is why so many want a part of it, and once in, will seek to perpetuate it.
 
Even when they don't like each other, the 'establishment club' tends to look after its own, which is why so many want a part of it, and once in, will seek to perpetuate it.
Entirely reminiscent of the EU and those pissed off at being turfed out of the queue for their turn on the jus train.
 
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I agree about your 'easily led' point, but that rather depends upon what they i.e. Johnson and Cummings, have got on him. The point is that he is effectively stepping down early and has been given a couple of consolation prizes in exchange for going quietly. Not a terribly edifying spectacle, tbh.
Ah - it's a holding officer's job if The Times is to be believed:

Apologies for paywall link, but the headline gives the clue - Mark Sedwill promised shot at Nato chief’s job
 
A member of the Blairite stay-behind forces then. This is where Tony Blair screwed up - he picked compliant but incompetent people to do his bidding.
Is it time for Godwin yet?

Incompetent but compliant goes back a lot further than TCB, indeed it was what made the difference between the IGA and the Wermacht.
 
Ah - it's a holding officer's job if The Times is to be believed:

Apologies for paywall link, but the headline gives the clue - Mark Sedwill promised shot at Nato chief’s job
Article in full.

'Boris Johnson has told Sir Mark Sedwill that he will nominate him to become Nato’s next secretary-general as the prime minister faces criticism for his changes to the top of Whitehall.

'Mr Johnson is understood to have promised that the government will back Sir Mark’s candidature as part of an exit package agreed with the cabinet secretary over the past few weeks. However, the post is not likely to become free until the end of 2022 when the incumbent, Jens Stoltenberg, is expected to retire after eight years. Although Mr Johnson told Sir Mark that securing the Nato role was critical to his “Global Britain” agenda, senior Whitehall figures doubt he will follow through on his promise.

'Sir Mark, 55, who is said to have fallen out with Dominic Cummings, the prime minister’s senior adviser, may struggle to win the support of other European Nato members amid probable competition from Mark Rutte, the Dutch prime minister, who is also said to covet the job.

“I think Mark is either brave or courageous to accept a promise that they’ll do that in 2022,” one Whitehall source said. “I really hope they keep their word but we’ve all seen this happen before. They say ‘don’t worry, we’ll support you’ but it’s basically half-hearted. They end up sacrificing you for something that they really want.” The promise came as Mr Johnson faced criticism for hiving off part of Sir Mark’s previous role as national security adviser and handing it to David Frost, who is a political adviser rather than a career civil servant. Senior government figures questioned whether Mr Frost had the experience and expressed concern that such a sensitive role should be handed to a political aide.

'The former cabinet secretary Lord O’Donnell warned that political appointees were more likely to be “yes men”, telling ministers what they wanted to hear rather than “speaking truth to power”. “I'm worried about the appointment of David Frost as national security adviser because I’m not quite sure how putting a special adviser in that role works,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today. Downing Street insisted that such appointments were not unusual in other countries and that Mr Frost, who has the status of an ambassador, had spent 25 years as a diplomat in the Foreign Office before leaving in 2013.

'The changes came in a wide reorganisation of Whitehall announced yesterday. In a further sign of Downing Street’s determination to centralise power, it published a new list of slimmed-down cabinet committees that will be the key decision-making bodies. The new structure will mean smaller departments being cut out of critical decisions. The domestic and economic strategy committee, chaired by Mr Johnson, will include only Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, and Michael Gove, the Cabinet Office minister, as full-time members, with others “invited to attend according to the agenda”.


 
Article in full.

'Boris Johnson has told Sir Mark Sedwill that he will nominate him to become Nato’s next secretary-general as the prime minister faces criticism for his changes to the top of Whitehall.

'Mr Johnson is understood to have promised that the government will back Sir Mark’s candidature as part of an exit package agreed with the cabinet secretary over the past few weeks. However, the post is not likely to become free until the end of 2022 when the incumbent, Jens Stoltenberg, is expected to retire after eight years. Although Mr Johnson told Sir Mark that securing the Nato role was critical to his “Global Britain” agenda, senior Whitehall figures doubt he will follow through on his promise.

'Sir Mark, 55, who is said to have fallen out with Dominic Cummings, the prime minister’s senior adviser, may struggle to win the support of other European Nato members amid probable competition from Mark Rutte, the Dutch prime minister, who is also said to covet the job.

“I think Mark is either brave or courageous to accept a promise that they’ll do that in 2022,” one Whitehall source said. “I really hope they keep their word but we’ve all seen this happen before. They say ‘don’t worry, we’ll support you’ but it’s basically half-hearted. They end up sacrificing you for something that they really want.” The promise came as Mr Johnson faced criticism for hiving off part of Sir Mark’s previous role as national security adviser and handing it to David Frost, who is a political adviser rather than a career civil servant. Senior government figures questioned whether Mr Frost had the experience and expressed concern that such a sensitive role should be handed to a political aide.

'The former cabinet secretary Lord O’Donnell warned that political appointees were more likely to be “yes men”, telling ministers what they wanted to hear rather than “speaking truth to power”. “I'm worried about the appointment of David Frost as national security adviser because I’m not quite sure how putting a special adviser in that role works,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today. Downing Street insisted that such appointments were not unusual in other countries and that Mr Frost, who has the status of an ambassador, had spent 25 years as a diplomat in the Foreign Office before leaving in 2013.

'The changes came in a wide reorganisation of Whitehall announced yesterday. In a further sign of Downing Street’s determination to centralise power, it published a new list of slimmed-down cabinet committees that will be the key decision-making bodies. The new structure will mean smaller departments being cut out of critical decisions. The domestic and economic strategy committee, chaired by Mr Johnson, will include only Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, and Michael Gove, the Cabinet Office minister, as full-time members, with others “invited to attend according to the agenda”.


Needs bribing to get him out of a job he's wilfully undermining and evidently has no belief in carrying out as ordered? Slimier than snot from a flu ridden oyster.

Hopefully the public take note and remember in case he surfaces at some point needing votes.
 
Do you think that Johnson will deliver for Sedwill in 2022? I'm not sure that I do...
Oh, yes. As confident as I am that Jeremy Corbyn will be announced as the next ambassador to Tel Aviv....

It’ll depend upon Boris’s ambitions with regard to NATO, and whether he wants to run a British candidate for the Secretary Generalship. Sedwill can be a useful stalking horse if nothing else - but the chances of his not having had a tempting offer to head an Oxbridge college or similar by 2022 seem slim...
 

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