Boris - The Prime Minister

First thoughts on PMBoris, will he make a difference?


  • Total voters
    570
And I would hope, if the response is less than exemplary of the charitable position they loudly espouse to all, the Press.

I was educated exclusively through Catholic schools. A denser sty of inadequates and hypocrites you'd be hard pressed to find.
Near my BiL and SiL (also close to me but closer to them) is a piece of land which is owned by the church (the trust which run it is called Churchlands) and Churchlands Trust is supposed to be for the good of the people of the parish. This land was allotments 30+ years ago but that was stopped due to lack of direct water. In the intervening years trees and bushes grew, the wildlife moved in. Year before last sudden appearance of a gardening team who promptly set about cutting down all the trees and bushes, left the place looking like The Somme. This was the first anyone who lives next to it knew about anything happening. Next a planning application went in to build circa 30 houses and the site was boarded off, no access to the walks through the area. Part of the process for a planning application is a wildlife assessment, what wildlife they've all been scared off or killed? That's how they got around that. Bishop was written to by irate citizens but the bishop washed their hands, nothing to do with me it's the trust.
 
Last edited:
Comms engineers are self isolating , so if a link goes down, getting someone to swap out a board or test is best efforts from those remaining.
Data infrastructure is classed as key worker, although it took an industry effort to convince the government this might be important.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Data infrastructure is classed as key worker, although it took an industry effort to convince the government this might be important.
True, but we've had a warning off our Comms provider that the ability to meet SLAs might be affected if sizeable numbers of staff come down with the virus. Fair enough really, as inconvenient as that might be. No one foresaw epedemics when drawing up contracts.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
True, but we've had a warning off our Comms provider that the ability to meet SLAs might be affected if sizeable numbers of staff come down with the virus. Fair enough really, as inconvenient as that might be. No one foresaw epedemics when drawing up contracts.
That is understandable. We pre-empted government policies by a week or so. SLAs may not be strictly enforced, but service is a priority.
 
That is understandable. We pre-empted government policies by a week or so. SLAs may not be strictly enforced, but service is a priority.
Absolutely. We accept it's best efforts on the part of the supplier and that it a nation wide issue.
 
I was obliged, once upon a time, to cadge a lift out of Iraq on a casevac flight

Two of the casualties, one Cpl and one Capt, were, while we were waiting for the connecting flight, arguing over snatch vs warrior.

The cpl was championing SNATCH, the officer warrior. It was a really interesting debate, and each gave a very good first hand account of why their preference was best. In the end, I think the Cpl had the most convincing case

So I am less persuaded that the anti-SNATCH lobby,armed with the glorious benefit of hindsight, necessarily had it right.
Forgive my quick dive into levity, but the words "championing SNATCH" reminded me of this famous red carpet moment....

1585403642911.png
 
You seem strangely reluctant to talk about what you did say which, for the record, was:

"When business starts bringing big bucks in after all this finishes, like they were before, it’s totally reasonable that they pay something back into the pot to help re establish fiscal normality."

Nothing in there qualifying the statement to apply solely to companies which accepted Government assistance.

Now, you were going to tell me about supply chains and their importance to a thriving economy...
And I standby that statement as I said before. Those that did not benefit in anyway from direct state support should obviously not have to contribute anything other than they would normally be expected to. However I clarified that several times after posting that, but you have just chosen to concentrate on that particular post.

I am no expert on supply chains and wouldn’t ever comment with any authority and as far as I know, I haven’t. A thriving economy is the goal of all.

The gist of my posts wasn’t aimed at that. It was about paying back when the good times return. Not unreasonable

Now you tell everyone on here about what you think of their military pensions, that you appear to despise.
 
Do stop whining.

I'm not getting criticism because the more discerning members of Arrse understand that I'm not questioning pensions per se. I'm challenging you because you're a humourless public sector drone with a massive and tedious sense of entitlement and a rapacious attitude towards what others have, together with the unshakeable and highly hypocritical belief that your own assets should be ring-fenced from predation.

Since you won't discuss supply chains, why not channel your pension outrage and talk us through how you opposed Gordon Brown's raid on private sector pensions in order to sustain a massive expansion of the public sector which included more police?
So to clarify, you believe that companies who receive tax payers money now to help them through this, which I totally accept as being reasonable and prudent, shouldn’t have to repay some or all of that at a later date when the good times return and they are making large profits?

You also think that companies shouldn’t be using their current cash reserves in the first instance and that shareholder dividends should continue with tax payers help?

You were criticising public sector pensions. That smacks of envy to me. My sense of public sector entitlement has seen me work through a pay freeze, a pension change, radical TACOS changes and a 25% staff reduction with minuscule pay rises until 2 years ago.

I have never voted Labour, so don’t feel a need to comment on Brown, who was an idiot.
 
I know some on here don't like Boris and don't think the government are doing a good job but the general public think his sh1t doesn't stink:

New polling by Number Cruncher Politics for Bloomberg this week has found that the Conservative Party has climbed by nine points since December’s election to 54% – the highest ever voting intention share that any Tory government has received. Conversely, Labour has dropped by five points since its worst election defeat since 1935…

The numbers are even more stark in terms of general approval rather than voting intention. 72% are satisfied with Boris Johnson, compared to just 25% who are not, giving him an astonishing approval rating of +47. General approval for the Government is slightly higher, with 73% approving compared to 24% disapproving. Highest of all is Rishi Sunak, who sees 77% approval, compared to just 16% who disapprove. A net approval rating of +61…

 
I know some on here don't like Boris and don't think the government are doing a good job but the general public think his sh1t doesn't stink:

New polling by Number Cruncher Politics for Bloomberg this week has found that the Conservative Party has climbed by nine points since December’s election to 54% – the highest ever voting intention share that any Tory government has received. Conversely, Labour has dropped by five points since its worst election defeat since 1935…

The numbers are even more stark in terms of general approval rather than voting intention. 72% are satisfied with Boris Johnson, compared to just 25% who are not, giving him an astonishing approval rating of +47. General approval for the Government is slightly higher, with 73% approving compared to 24% disapproving. Highest of all is Rishi Sunak, who sees 77% approval, compared to just 16% who disapprove. A net approval rating of +61…

And the figures for Corbyn and Labour are?
 
And the figures for Corbyn and Labour are?
Well it took some doing but since it's worst election defeat since 1935 Labour (or the party which was formerly known as Labour) are 5 points down from even that dismal low point.
 
No it hasn’t, read them. At no point, have I sought to imply that, only to suggest that when this is all over, businesses that return to making large amounts of money, should return some of that to the tax payer if they received assistance.
It is going to take many years before a lot of the large businesses return to making large sums of money. The government hasn't just given financial assistance to businesses it has given financial assistance to millions of individuals up and down the land, many of whom are going to be on the bones of their arse after all this.

You also need to remember that it's the private sector that generates most of the income that the state relies upon by way of taxation. Without the government intervention many of these businesses would have gone to the wall in just a few days, costing tens of thousands, if not millions, of jobs and those businesses that would have survived may have shed much of their workforce to the minimum they needed to survive. All those unemployed would cost the state £billions by way of benefits as well as the lost productivity from barely surviving businesses and many of the lost jobs will be lost forever.

Once the virus has been defeated we enter into a gradual recovery phase and this will last decades. Yes, many businesses will flourish quite quickly but for many others it will be a long haul before they are able to get to the level they were at before this crisis began. These businesses need time to recover, including employing any lost workers, so hitting them too hard too quickly will be counter-productive as many may think it's just not worth the time, cost or effort and wrap their hands in. Of course businesses that have been helped ought to repay the debt they owe but I think the best way they can do that is to be successful by being productive, profitable and by increasing employment. This all increases the tax take for the government.
 
That’s not in dispute, I have recently though given him the benefit of the doubt on numerous occasions as he appears to have changed and become less buffoonish, gaffe prone and started acting in a more Prime Ministerial manner. Very welcome and I hope he recovers soon.
Many of us said this will happen when he ran for the Tory leadership and then going into the general election. We did warn not to get taken in by his buffoonery act. His mannerisms are still there, they are part of him, but he is far more serious now that he is in the position of holding high office and the responsibility that goes with it.

He was once or twice accused in these pages, particularly before he became party leader and PM, of not reading his brief and disregarding the advice given to him. This crisis has given proof to that lie as he is clearly on top of his brief, listens to and acts upon that advice and publically acknowledges that advice and who gives it. Credit where credit is due. You can't ask for much more than that and I doubt there are many MPs that would have been able to do such a stand-out job that he is doing.

I'm really impressed with his decision to appoint Rishi Sunak, somebody I'd previously never heard of, who has really taken to his role of Chancellor like a duck to water.

Once this is all over I expect there to be a fair few gongs for public service being handed out, not only to the great and the good but to the ordinary members of society that have pitched in .
 
Define struggling.

I am struggling to buy an Aston Martin, holiday in St. Barts and diamond tiaras. I still only have a 22 inch television and no iPad or nike trainers.
You need to go out with some culturally enriched night time shoppers.
 

Truxx

LE
Without the government intervention many of these businesses would have gone to the wall in just a few days, costing tens of thousands, if not millions, of jobs and those businesses that would have survived may have shed much of their workforce to the minimum they needed to survive. All those unemployed would cost the state £billions by way of benefits as well as the lost productivity from barely surviving businesses and many of the lost jobs will be lost forever.
Many will go to the wall anyway.
 
Well it took some doing but since it's worst election defeat since 1935 Labour (or the party which was formerly known as Labour) are 5 points down from even that dismal low point.
Thanks. I did read them the first time round, but I just wanted to see them in print again. :)
 

Latest Threads

Top