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Boris - The Prime Minister

First thoughts on PMBoris, will he make a difference?


  • Total voters
    609
You could try kettling them then releasing them one at a time with the requisite fine after obtaining their identity, no id means arrest, simples!

How many officers would it take to contain a disturbance of several thousand and then gain enough compliance to funnel them out in an orderly manner with names/dob and addresses being verified? I’m sure that you have worked it out.

Mass disobedience with name refusal would mean not enough officers to arrest and transport with too few cells.
 
How many officers would it take to contain a disturbance of several thousand and then gain enough compliance to funnel them out in an orderly manner with names/dob and addresses being verified? I’m sure that you have worked it out.

Mass disobedience with name refusal would mean not enough officers to arrest and transport with too few cells.

If you stayed off here that would be an extra person to help out :grin:
 

HCL

Old-Salt
Just to clarify, Britannia wasn’t launched until just before the Coronation, and commissioned in early 1954.
Royal passengers on her maiden voyage, into the Med, were HM Queen Mother, Prince Charles and Princess Anne who were travelling to meet their parents on their way home from the post-Coronation world tour.

My mistake. Wrong about Britannia. Not wrong about Tonga though.
 

rifleair

War Hero
How many officers would it take to contain a disturbance of several thousand and then gain enough compliance to funnel them out in an orderly manner with names/dob and addresses being verified? I’m sure that you have worked it out.

Mass disobedience with name refusal would mean not enough officers to arrest and transport with too few cells.
Not up to me to decide how many officers are required or to work it out, I'm just giving an opinion, as I understand it kettling is a common tactic used by police in london with the intention to corrall the demonstrators in a particular location enabling the police to release the demonstrators in a controlled manner and has been used several times in the past.
I would think that the majority of those corralled would have some form of id on them, those that don't or 'lose' their id would have to be arrested, if the police want to be taken seriously again in this country they should start acting like police and stop whinging about how difficult it is to control crowds.
 
...just surprised that this has not been the subject of outrage on our National Broadcast station who normally would take a statement such as this as an attack on their licence payers!

Those would be the licence payers they'd happily see shaken down by Big Vinnie and the boys should they fail to contribute to the mandatory champagne and larks' tongues fund?
 

Truxx

LE
Will they?
What resourcing does a large scale public order incident take, compared to a licensing check?
10 Durham coppers in 5 vans. Each van selects 2 individuals at random from the crowd. Ideally ones who look like they are front and centre in the leadership stakes. Back to the station, magistrate by 1200 the next day and a fine of 10K apiece.

Then let twitter and fizzogbook do their thing.

I say Durham coppers because of their robust showing at our annual pikeyfest.
 
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FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I think militant trade unionism has moved on since the days when the workers would eagerly walk out of the gate for several weeks at the drop of a hat or, as it used to be, by a majority show of hands or even a loony left leadership urging their members to take action.

A mixture of legislation and huge changes in public attitudes plus an economy that has for various reasons caused the trade unions to lose millions of members means that the power of the unions has diminished to that of being a minor player in most things that might affect the nation these days.

It is a fact though that police numbers have been slashed over the last decade and the stories of overworked constables trying to cope with huge increases in crime figures while weighed down with paperwork are plentiful if you inquire about just exactly what are police officers doing these days.

In case you haven’t noticed, the military have been playing a role in this pandemic almost since it began earlier in the year firstly in providing expertise to boost infrastructure to help deal with the pandemic and some logistics moving stuff around to where it‘s needed. It’s also already supplied some boots on the ground to help conduct covid19 testing.

The fact that the police service may require help by having the military take on some of the behind the scenes roles isn’t really a surprise given the cuts to public services implemented over the years and even if that did ultimately have to include some personnel right on the front line, the causes for that happening will be because they are replacing previous resources that were at some stage taken away.

Not because the country is in the grip of some form of militancy by institutions beyond anybodies control.

What you say is true for the Trades Unions in the private sector, where they are a shadow of their former selves but still provide a necessary counter-weight. Generally, on the occasions I've worked with them, I've been impressed, particularly in the HSSE space.

By contrast, the public sector unions are over-mighty and have long needed taking down several pegs to the point where I'm inclined to the view that, whilst union membership with regard to pay, conditions and employment protection is entirely legitimate, it should be illegal for public servants to organise politically.
 
Er, no. A statement answered with a statement. Questions usually have a question mark at the end. Do try harder :)
I did ask and he says he's gen, not a sock, no sir not him uh uh.
 
What you say is true for the Trades Unions in the private sector, where they are a shadow of their former selves but still provide a necessary counter-weight. Generally, on the occasions I've worked with them, I've been impressed, particularly in the HSSE space.

By contrast, the public sector unions are over-mighty and have long needed taking down several pegs to the point where I'm inclined to the view that, whilst union membership with regard to pay, conditions and employment protection is entirely legitimate, it should be illegal for public servants to organise politically.

I thought that rule already exists for public sector employees above a certain grade. However, the newly appointed head of the NHS testing and tracing program and the newly appointed chair of the National Institute for Health Protection certainly earns significantly above the level set for political activity from some of her work in the public sector while still taking the Tory whip in the HoL.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I thought that rule already exists for public sector employees above a certain grade. However, the newly appointed head of the NHS testing and tracing program and the newly appointed chair of the National Institute for Health Protection certainly earns significantly above the level set for political activity from some of her work in the public sector while still taking the Tory whip in the HoL.

It should exist for public sector employees of any grade.

As for QUANGOs - they've long been political gravy trains across the board and the fewer the better.
 
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Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
That's because they'll be down the pub.
Thanks for that - it's always handy having a doddering RO stating the bleeding obvious. Youreally earned your pay tonight.
 

Chimp

ADC
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