Army Rumour Service

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Boris - The Prime Minister

First thoughts on PMBoris, will he make a difference?


  • Total voters
    609
President of The Airport, eh?



Is that him?
Si
 
Pause that 'Intergrated SDSR20' release.


Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Is this true, Boris threatening to use the army to kick people out of pubs?

Even the BBC think it's bollocks

17:35
Beware of 'Tanks on the Streets' rumours

Marianna Spring
Disinformation and social media reporter
At the start of the pandemic, false claims about tanks on the streets of the UK to enforce lockdown went viral online.
Following the prime minister's announcement that he might use the Army to enforce new measures, similar claims have spread on social media about the military and martial law.
A spokesperson for the prime minister has since clarified what he meant, explaining the system has been used in the past and would involve the military back-filling certain duties.
That includes guarding protected sites, so police officers can be out enforcing the virus response.
But with many of us worried, frustrated and consumed about new changes, it’s a fertile time for misinformation to spread in WhatsApp and Facebook groups.
Here’s a reminder of how you can stop bad information going viral:
  • Interrogate the source - and pause before you share. Where has the information come from? A copied and pasted message that’s attributed to a friend of a friend is much less reliable than trusted sources for updates
  • Ask yourself how a post makes you feel. Often misleading information and conspiracy theories play on the feelings of worry and frustration that come with news about possible restrictions
  • Think about bias. Lots of people share false claims about lockdown or coronavirus that confirm their political opinions. Criticism of the government’s handling of the pandemic, general confusion and opposition to measures are all very legitimate. Unhelpful panicky messages and claims coronavirus is a "hoax" are less useful
 
Never thought you were that obtuse. You do understand the phrase "editorial stance changed overnight" don't you ?
I know exactly what it means, it still isn't anti brexit though. It's just not rabid and spittle flecked any longer. As I've said and @Archimedes has explained, he's doing what he was asked to do. Which is to soften the tone,
 
I'm now reading the 177 pages of the Withdrawal Agreement in full for the first time.

Unlike the GFA, which seems relatively balanced in the greater scheme of things, the WA is extraordinarily lop-sided.

I've done, and supervised, a lot of serious and detailed commercial negotiation over the years. Without fail, the first thing a negotiator should do when presented with a contentious clause or amendment is to make its obligations or rights mutual, so as to test how the opposition respond to being bound by the same requirement. It's negotiation 101.

I'm genuinely surprised by the sheer number of one-way clauses in the WA, where a mutually binding clause would be an obvious requirement given the content. The more I read, the clearer it becomes that the negotiators had something other in mind than negotiating the best outcome for the UK.

For those interested, read the recitals at the start of the Agreement (which set out the intentions of the Parties). Note which recitals are mutual, and which are one way. You'll be quite surprised.

May and Robbins have a good deal to answer for, whether you believe in Brexit or not.
May and Robbins?
1600795902232.png
 
Your second para. Already robustly stated yesterday by Hancock, virtually ignored by the entire MSM.

Boris much the same this weekend. But the current crew are fully aware that telling the general public in general and ethnic groups in particular that they are a bunch of selfish w*nkers is not likely to win friends and influence anything other than a backlash.
How about trips to Durham?
 

Truxx

LE
Can anyone explain what Bozo was trying to say with this?


Was it that a well functioning TT and T system doesn’t really matter, or Brits can’t follow rules?
A recent conversation with a resident of Italy reveals what lockdown meant to her and her family. 4 months confined to the apartment. Allowed out for 45 mins daily, time specified, in which to do all that needed to be done, such as shopping.

All enforced by the police and caribineri with a no quibble on the spot fine and escort back to the residence.

So you bet your bottom dollar that there is a difference. The difference is the average brit does not know they are born.
 

Truxx

LE
Even the BBC think it's bollocks

17:35
Beware of 'Tanks on the Streets' rumours

Marianna Spring
Disinformation and social media reporter
At the start of the pandemic, false claims about tanks on the streets of the UK to enforce lockdown went viral online.
Following the prime minister's announcement that he might use the Army to enforce new measures, similar claims have spread on social media about the military and martial law.
A spokesperson for the prime minister has since clarified what he meant, explaining the system has been used in the past and would involve the military back-filling certain duties.
That includes guarding protected sites, so police officers can be out enforcing the virus response.
But with many of us worried, frustrated and consumed about new changes, it’s a fertile time for misinformation to spread in WhatsApp and Facebook groups.
Here’s a reminder of how you can stop bad information going viral:
  • Interrogate the source - and pause before you share. Where has the information come from? A copied and pasted message that’s attributed to a friend of a friend is much less reliable than trusted sources for updates
  • Ask yourself how a post makes you feel. Often misleading information and conspiracy theories play on the feelings of worry and frustration that come with news about possible restrictions
  • Think about bias. Lots of people share false claims about lockdown or coronavirus that confirm their political opinions. Criticism of the government’s handling of the pandemic, general confusion and opposition to measures are all very legitimate. Unhelpful panicky messages and claims coronavirus is a "hoax" are less useful
That set of bullet points.

If the answer to bullet 1 is "the BBC".......
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top