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Boris’s Progress.

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
With regard to BJ’s progress, the police seriously messed up with his escort. The protesters who brought his car to a halt (rather than just slowing it) could have been ‘baddies’ with weapons.

I thought they did a good job, straight in on the bikes with a block. Nobody on the peaceful protest hurt and everyone carried on.

I thought it a bit of quick thinking and good use of the bikes, given the film coverage.

Then again, my natural sympathy is with the bikes, in case one is inadvertently pushed over.
The bastards, hurting an innocent motorcycle.
 
The new leader of the Lib Dems vows to de-rail Brexit. This was a democratic outcome of a referendum. Therefore her little party can hardly be called 'democratic'.
Also the fact that even if there was a "put it to the people vote" and we still voted to leave she has stated she would not honour that either. Not very democratic really. More like Lib Autocratics.
 
No further legislation is required to leave, we can leave tomorrow if the cabinet sign it off and BJ writes the letter. Parliament will be cross, they will vote no confidence and force a GE. But the Brexit party will no longer count, BJ will have completed his first promise and he will win the GE.
 
No further legislation is required to leave, we can leave tomorrow if the cabinet sign it off and BJ writes the letter. Parliament will be cross, they will vote no confidence and force a GE. But the Brexit party will no longer count, BJ will have completed his first promise and he will win the GE.
In theory. As you say, we could "leave".

What would derail a glorious march into the Borisian sunlit uplands future is the very real recession that would almost certainly follow, along with a host of unforeseen problems that would also materialise.

Crashing the economy in flames through recklessness is a very good way to lose elections.
 
In theory. As you say, we could "leave".

What would derail a glorious march into the Borisian sunlit uplands future is the very real recession that would almost certainly follow, along with a host of unforeseen problems that would also materialise.

Crashing the economy in flames through recklessness is a very good way to lose elections.

Crashing whose economy? First, the EU have more to lose. Second, a large chunk of leave voters were fed up being excluded from major parts of the economy that are of 'remain' concern. I am not advocating any particular solution, but merely pointing out some of the options. I do not however, believe that staying within the EU is one of them. Nor is staying within the Customs Union or Single Market as to do so would bind the UK to the very things the voters chose to abandon.

ETA some home truths:
The electorate chose to leave.
Parliament voted to leave.
Government introduced a bill to leave.
The bill passed all stages of the legislative process.
The bill recieved royal assent.
Those who are attempting to overturn these democratic processes are doing so in their own self-interest and are demanding the inclusion of measures that would render the process of 'leaving' devoid of any meaning. The UK would become a non voting, non influential junior partner in a system determined to federalize both the political and economic processes linked to the customs union and single market.
The UK in these circumstances would continue to be bound by European Law - a system of law that is alien to the UK's Common Law process.
There are socio, economic and political reasons why 17m voters acted the way they did. Thus far there has not been one iota of response to those reasons. Attitudes have therefore hardened and we are where we are. It is a battle for the survival of the ideas behind the vote - effectively an idealogical war....and in war, some things are inevitably destroyed.

Remainers have been in power for decades and yet the inherent inequalities in the UK also remain. To quote a 1970s/80s Bond movie....'you had your chance, and you blew it'.
 
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What would derail a glorious march into the Borisian sunlit uplands future is the very real recession that would almost certainly follow, along with a host of unforeseen problems that would also materialise.
Maybe, possibly, that's one view.
Crashing the economy in flames through recklessness is a very good way to lose elections.
That's another negative viewpoint.
However this isn't yet another Brexit thread, this is a Boris thread. I'm very pleased to see that he has ditched all of the May doom n gloom cabinet and filled it with his own people. :)
Including Jacob Rees Mogg for his first parliamentary job as leader of the house, perfectly suited to the inky swot ;)
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Maybe, possibly, that's one view.
That's another negative viewpoint.
However this isn't yet another Brexit thread, this is a Boris thread. I'm very pleased to see that he has ditched all of the May doom n gloom cabinet and filled it with his own people. :)
Including Jacob Rees Mogg for his first parliamentary job as leader of the house, perfectly suited to the inky swot ;)

Boris is Brexit.
 
Britannia was in need of a BJ, Boris merely answered the call
 
Maybe, possibly, that's one view.
That's another negative viewpoint.
However this isn't yet another Brexit thread, this is a Boris thread. I'm very pleased to see that he has ditched all of the May doom n gloom cabinet and filled it with his own people. :)
Including Jacob Rees Mogg for his first parliamentary job as leader of the house, perfectly suited to the inky swot ;)

Some say negative. Others say realistic.

There has always been a strong streak of romanticism (or fantasy) in the Brexit debate, and those in the dirty engine room of government don't see sunny upsides. We see smoke, fire and hear grating noises as the engine of State comes apart.

Still, the deckchairs in the first class passenger lounge have been rearranged.
 
Some say negative. Others say realistic.

There has always been a strong streak of romanticism (or fantasy) in the Brexit debate, and those in the dirty engine room of government don't see sunny upsides. We see smoke, fire and hear grating noises as the engine of State comes apart.

Still, the deckchairs in the first class passenger lounge have been rearranged.
You are Bagl0ck and I claim my crispy new £5 note!
 
Has The Leader spoken to the EU yet as that might bring him down to depressive state.
Surely the Frech & Germans who we do business with will want a deal.

An example: BMW/Mercedes/MAN sell 850k of vehicles including LGV's to the UK in a year.
Just 1 month of no trade = 70,833 vehicles alone, so can Macron & Merkel really afford no trade.
This could push up unemployment in Germany/France and lower tax revenues.

So may be closer to the31st October Boris might get a enhanced deal?
 
Crashing whose economy? First, the EU have more to lose. Second, a large chunk of leave voters were fed up being excluded from major parts of the economy that are of 'remain' concern. I am not advocating any particular solution, but merely pointing out some of the options. I do not however, believe that staying within the EU is one of them. Nor is staying within the Customs Union or Single Market as to do so would bind the UK to the very things the voters chose to abandon.

ETA some home truths:
The electorate chose to leave.
Parliament voted to leave.
Government introduced a bill to leave.
The bill passed all stages of the legislative process.
The bill recieved royal assent.
Those who are attempting to overturn these democratic processes are doing so in their own self-interest and are demanding the inclusion of measures that would render the process of 'leaving' devoid of any meaning. The UK would become a non voting, non influential junior partner in a system determined to federalize both the political and economic processes linked to the customs union and single market.
The UK in these circumstances would continue to be bound by European Law - a system of law that is alien to the UK's Common Law process.
There are socio, economic and political reasons why 17m voters acted the way they did. Thus far there has not been one iota of response to those reasons. Attitudes have therefore hardened and we are where we are. It is a battle for the survival of the ideas behind the vote - effectively an idealogical war....and in war, some things are inevitably destroyed.

Remainers have been in power for decades and yet the inherent inequalities in the UK also remain. To quote a 1970s/80s Bond movie....'you had your chance, and you blew it'.

In order, our economy, probably followed by several of our neighbours.
Your argument makes little sense.

EU has more to lose? So do the passengers on an airliner when the pilot shoots himself in the head in mid flight. They can't stop him. From their point of view, his decision costs him and them, but it is probably insane.

The simple fact is that the referendum and indeed the political meanderings are now of negligible interest. I don't personally give a flying croissant for the eternal whine from the winning side about the 17 million who voted to leave.

What they didn't have (because this would have disrupted their underdog pride), was any conception of what happens next.

Now, the Brexiters are in the driving seat. They are all ideologically pure.
They have spent three years eagerly betraying the last PM for having a plan that they were agreed that they DIDN'T like, but have no consensus on what they DO agree on.

Now, it is their problem. Either they can (against all precedent), come up with a mutually agreed master plan that Parliament AND the EU will accept, OR they will find the gritty dirty job of actually implementing Brexit impossible, will crash out in a fit of despair or incompetence, and take one of the G6 economies for a toboggan ride.

That won't do much for the UKs image as a responsible world power and trading partner.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
In order, our economy, probably followed by several of our neighbours.
Your argument makes little sense.

EU has more to lose? So do the passengers on an airliner when the pilot shoots himself in the head in mid flight. They can't stop him. From their point of view, his decision costs him and them, but it is probably insane.

The simple fact is that the referendum and indeed the political meanderings are now of negligible interest. I don't personally give a flying croissant for the eternal whine from the winning side about the 17 million who voted to leave.

What they didn't have (because this would have disrupted their underdog pride), was any conception of what happens next.

Now, the Brexiters are in the driving seat. They are all ideologically pure.
They have spent three years eagerly betraying the last PM for having a plan that they were agreed that they DIDN'T like, but have no consensus on what they DO agree on.

Now, it is their problem. Either they can (against all precedent), come up with a mutually agreed master plan that Parliament AND the EU will accept, OR they will find the gritty dirty job of actually implementing Brexit impossible, will crash out in a fit of despair or incompetence, and take one of the G6 economies for a toboggan ride.

That won't do much for the UKs image as a responsible world power and trading partner.

It's only right and proper they now own the panto.
 

oppoStu

War Hero
UK needs a plan, deal or no deal, security is necessary so we can start lining up future trade deals. If we do crash out with no deal, there is nothing preventing us forming another trade deal with the EU after 31st October.

Since Boris is best buds with Trump, I look forward to seeing a very sweet USA trade deal on the table following Halloween, along with all the candies from trick or treating.
 
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