Book on the Build up to D-Day

Discussion in 'The Book Club' started by Gundulph, Jun 11, 2008.

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  1. After having just tried to read D-Day by Stephen E. Ambrose again and launching it for good out of the window I was wondering whether there are any good books out there about the training and build up to D-Day?

    Ambrose clearly has a dislike for the British, every page if possible he has a dig from trying to say many of the LCA British Coxswains were cowards to blaming the mishaps at Omaha on British made LCA's that had too much armour on the sides and were the fault of many being swamped and sinking! he talks about how much of a success the Rangers were at Pointe-Du-Hoc, which they were, however he very quickly mentions it was down to their training and very briefly mentions British Commandoes were part of their training but clearly he doesn't elaborate as God forbid that would have meant just maybe the Brits had a part in the success of D-Day and not just the Yanks!!!

    Are there any books that go into the training of all the Forces prior to D-Day, in particular Lord Lovat's Brigade etc.? I know at the Spean Bridge Hotel there is the small Museum but are there any good books available? even of the Americans being trained by Brit Instructors?

    Thanks in Advance.....
  2. Got The Fighting Fourth today which is far closer to what you want than anything else I could think of before. There is a whole chapter devoted to pre-D-Day training and the book covers most of the Army Commandos' history - the author was a founder member of No.4 Cdo then an instructor at Achnacarry.

    For the most part the Army & RM Cdos were not given super-special missions in the vein of Pointe-du-Hoc. Instead they were generally used for 'deep penetration' forward of the bridgehead, e.g. 47 Cdo taking Port-en-Bessin from behind from GOLD and Lovat's lot pushing out to reinforce 6 Abn. I suppose this allowed the assault Div commanders to concentrate on securing the bridgehead rather than worrying about - or losing their units to - sideshows.
  3. There is a good book called Commando Country which is rather detailed.
  4. My step father was a young lad in Portsmouth during the war. His memory of D Day was that in the weeks before the streets were full of troops and vehicles, including a line of tanks parked outside his front door. He woke up one morning and they had all gone. Theh they heard on the wireless that the invasion of Europe had started during the night.