Bodycare UK ban poppies

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#3
I cant say that I will boycot their brand name as I never buy their stuff anyway. Tossers.
 
#5
A spokesman for Bodycare’s parent company, GR and MM Blackledge, said: "Employees are only allowed to wear their uniform, and charitable pins would not be considered part of the uniform.”

The spokesman said the company did not differentiate between charities, having decided to ban all wristbands and charity emblems.
Almost identical wording to that which Jon Snow used a couple of years ago.

It's a blanket ban, what's the problem?
 
#6
Am i living in the dark ages?

Who the f...k are these people?

Its a free country, or so I thought, religious and belief views are free to be expressed, or so said the Law Lords yesterday.
 
#7
A spokesman for Bodycare’s parent company, GR and MM Blackledge, said: "Employees are only allowed to wear their uniform, and charitable pins would not be considered part of the uniform.”

The spokesman said the company did not differentiate between charities, having decided to ban all wristbands and charity emblems.

It is more than a charity emblem it is an act of Rememberance
 
#10
I can see both sides of this argument and I still think thye are a bunch of CNUTS.
As someone else has said, I dont use thier products but if I did, I wouldnt now.

No disrespect intended to other charities, but I think plastic bands look stupid and unprofessional. But the poppy is surely a special case and is a national sign of respect and remembrance.
 
#11
mick_sterbs said:
its akin to a belief and that expression can't be withheld by employers.
If you're talking about the Human Rights Act, Article 10 (Freedom of Expression) - this only applies to the Government, not to private sector employers. As for employment law, even with the deification of Green beliefs recently, this only applies to recruitment & dismissal, not to wear in / on uniform. Hence all the fuss about BA and crosses etc (backed down because of adverse publicity, not because the ban was illegal.)

Not to say I think it is right, just that it's not illegal.
 
#12
am i to late or has the bus left? :)
 
#13
Blokeonabike said:
No disrespect intended to other charities, but I think plastic bands look stupid and unprofessional. But the poppy is surely a special case and is a national sign of respect and remembrance.
It's the bit about not differentiating between charities and a blanket ban that annoys me. I know we're nearly all biased here, but surely as a symbol of Remembrance, the poppy is something different altogether?

Who's got the POL card for the bus?
 
#14
Never heard of them and Wigan is too bloody far away for me to make my mark on, however, just think how wonderful it would be if every Poppy Seller for miles around turned up on Saturday and stood outside their shops a-rattling their tins!
 
#15
bomb_mac said:
A spokesman for Bodycare’s parent company, GR and MM Blackledge, said: "Employees are only allowed to wear their uniform, and charitable pins would not be considered part of the uniform.”

The spokesman said the company did not differentiate between charities, having decided to ban all wristbands and charity emblems.

It is more than a charity emblem it is an act of Rememberance
It does appear a bit nit picking, but where do they stop? Basically it's their ball so they make the rules of the game.
Incidentally I wonder what percentage of wearers do so as an act of rememberance rather than the "November badge".
 
#16
Why does it matter? Seriously, the company is at liberty to do what it wants. Isn't that the point of free speech? I think we should worry about more important things.
 
#17
Idrach said:
mick_sterbs said:
its akin to a belief and that expression can't be withheld by employers.
If you're talking about the Human Rights Act, Article 10 (Freedom of Expression) - this only applies to the Government, not to private sector employers. As for employment law, even with the deification of Green beliefs recently, this only applies to recruitment & dismissal, not to wear in / on uniform. Hence all the fuss about BA and crosses etc (backed down because of adverse publicity, not because the ban was illegal.)

Not to say I think it is right, just that it's not illegal.
But if you were a Burkha or turban that wasn't strictly uniform, or were called to prayer 5 times a day that would be ok? I think that was Mick's point.
 
#18
Magdovus said:
Why does it matter? Seriously, the company is at liberty to do what it wants. Isn't that the point of free speech? I think we should worry about more important things.
No. Stone them, stone them! I'm sure I heard someone say 'Jehovah' in one of their branches while buying smellies for Mrs DS one Christmas. (Or was it 'Jojoba'?)
 
#20
shape.when.wet said:
But if you were a Burkha or turban that wasn't strictly uniform, or were called to prayer 5 times a day that would be ok? I think that was Mick's point.
No - the turban and Salah (muslim prayer) are religious requirements. The burkha and the poppy are not.

But you can still enforce bans against religious requirements, provided that they are not discriminatory and that there is a legitimate business aim and no reasonable alternative.
 
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