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Blunkett and the Police....

#1
The Home Office is to introduce a new three-digit telephone number for non-emergency calls to the police, Home Secretary David Blunkett has revealed.

The scheme will be designed to ease pressure on the 999 system, which has seen its annual number of calls rise 40% to 10 million in the past six years.

Mr Blunkett said the massive technological project would be part of a new "Coppers' Contract" setting out standards of service the public can expect when they call the police.

He said the public must see "dramatic improvements" in the police's "customer service".

The contract, to be introduced in every force in England and Wales over the next two years, will ensure calls to the police are answered "promptly and politely", he said.

It will apply to all contact with officers - whether on the street corner, 999 calls, ordinary telephone calls to the local police station or contact over the internet.

The three-digit number - possibly 333 or 888 - has been under discussion for several years.

Mr Blunkett said: "I'm fed up with waiting for people to get their act together on this.

"It is an absolute fact that call handling is the one area of greatest dissatisfaction with the police. This will help turn around the way people feel about the police.

"If people can have it explained that the crime has been registered, there will be a call back to them and something is being done they will accept a delay in a formal visit from a uniformed police officer."
What utter rubbish.

call handling is the one area of greatest dissatisfaction with the police.
Well...No

This is yet another example of just how out of touch with reality Blunkett, Blair and the rest of the labour lickspittles are.
 
#2
Not being a cop - though knowing some - I would have thought the publics biggest area of disatisfaction with police-work was much the same as the police themselves:- ie:-

their (police) hands being so tied by P.C rhetoric, bureaucratic b/s & paperwork that they dont have time to actually attend to crime anymore. It may be say a 40 minute job to 'nick' someone at the scene of a crime - but then there are all the careful steps to insure that the perps civil rights arent trodden on, and then the requisite 5 days worth of paperwork.

Dont really see that a new number will change a damn thing....
 
#3
One of my problems with the police is the fact that you can't get one when you want one because they are too busy trying to catch people at 32mph in a 30 zone.

My real problem is that they seem to have become increasingly self-serving. The ultimate example of this is when that woman bled to death after being shot at a barbecue. The senior officer present refused to allow anyone including paramedics to go to the scene to help because of the risk to his officer of the gunman being still about. He said, "My first duty is to the safety of my officers." To my mind this is completly wrong, his first duty is to members of the public in danger, then to paramedics and lastly - by a long way - to his officers. If people die because of the cowardice of plods, they are no longer doing what we think we pay them for.
 
#4
Bladensburg said:
If people die because of the cowardice of plods, they are no longer doing what we think we pay them for.
I don't think there's anything in a plod's contract that requires them to lay down their lives for the public they serve.

The balance is always difficult and sometimes people don't like the outcome.
 
#5
Rudolph_Hucker said:
I don't think there's anything in a plod's contract that requires them to lay down their lives for the public they serve.
I can't remember seeing one in our "contract" but we know if it came to it, we would have to :?
 

maninblack

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
two minites ago I had a chat with a home counties traffic plod who is moving from his force to the Met because he is sick of his local force failing to respond when there is an incident on the estate where he lives. He is ashamed of his county constabulary and what it has been froced to become.
 
#7
More confusion, more statistics, more New Labour and more B3 (Bearded bigot Blunkett) When are we going to get rid of this bunch of w@nkers?

How much is this going to cost in manpower, effort, and money. Money which could go into a really novel concept like, more coppers on the beat.

Next they'll be putting in a "Please hold, your call is important to us" message whilst you wait for an answer.
 
#8
My first post here. Probably my last as i know nowt about most of these things. Speaking as an ex constable, just like to point out a few things. Firstly, when I was in, I only ever met one copper who could be called a coward. There is no lack of courage in the section ranks certainly and it is often a lonely courage as most of the stuff you do is off your own bat and on your own. A rusty browning or a filleting knife still kills you if you don't use your big stick properly.

Secondly, the contract is largely by oath and the oath is similar (or was in my day) to the army oath and yes you are expected to lay down your life if necessary and when it happens to one of your own its the same numbness and then you carry one when you've ( in defence of your mind) decided you never liked the bas###d anyway.

When i left in 1993 the political correctness was just starting to seep in. No longer did we carry a marble for each finger in our left hand glove and you got fined and disciplined for calling a "woman constable" a peewee or even wpc. About the same time they stopped screaming at you if you had your hands in your pockets and pc's started to disobey lawful orders without sanction. The old, old system of babywalking also seemed to disappear where a graduate entrant or similar destined for high rank always had an experienced and good pc behind them to effectively make their decisions for them.

The main reason it has gone fubar though is thisallegedly I think
!5 years ago or less in some forces, an average section had 15 men with long experience and 2 sergeants and 1 inspector churned out per shift. It might now have if well staffed 1 sergeant and 3 constables. The constables will be short service and looking to a specialised section away from the public and any older constables again allegedly, will be sitting tight trying to protect their pensions so they stop functioning properly and risk taking. Please remember that certain disciplinary actions, a criminal offence plus miscellaneous other factors result in complete loss of all contributions made.

Best regards, folks.
 
#9
dui-lai said:
Rudolph_Hucker said:
I don't think there's anything in a plod's contract that requires them to lay down their lives for the public they serve.
I can't remember seeing one in our "contract" but we know if it came to it, we would have to :?
I was criticising the cowardice comment which seemed to imply it was a requirement for police persons to die on the job!!

They have more bottle than most in doing the job they do.
 
#10
There is no lack of courage in the section ranks certainly and it is often a lonely courage as most of the stuff you do is off your own bat and on your own. A rusty browning or a filleting knife still kills you if you don't use your big stick properly.
Hi Blurp,
Fair comment.
 
#11
Bladensburg said:
One of my problems with the police is the fact that you can't get one when you want one because they are too busy trying to catch people at 32mph in a 30 zone.

My real problem is that they seem to have become increasingly self-serving. The ultimate example of this is when that woman bled to death after being shot at a barbecue. The senior officer present refused to allow anyone including paramedics to go to the scene to help because of the risk to his officer of the gunman being still about. He said, "My first duty is to the safety of my officers." To my mind this is completly wrong, his first duty is to members of the public in danger, then to paramedics and lastly - by a long way - to his officers. If people die because of the cowardice of plods, they are no longer doing what we think we pay them for.
Hey Bladensburg,

Have you ever disarmed a guy with a knife on your own with no hope of backup? Have you fought with a man on a 9th roof top who was trying to throw himself off? Unarmed and surrounded by a jeering hostile crowd? Have you stopped three men coming out of the back of a bank at 0200 wondering if they are armed blaggers and you are going to get a kicking or more likely get shot.

I have not had a spectacular career but I have done all these things.

Many of my collegues have done much much more. At least two of people who worked close to me have been paralysed for life by police service. A friend of a friend went to an early grave, murdered by a mental patient. Don't you dare call the organisation I work for "self serving" you really have no idea what we do or why we do it.



Trotsky
 
#12
trotsk , i don't think bladenburg is having a pop at the rank and file plod on the beat , but the "new cadre" of fast track promoted inspectors especially picked for their blind obedience , social worker skills , and no f*cking comprehension of street coppering.

after all even if a copper is stalking motorists , he ain't doing it of his own back , i wouldn't do your job for all the tea in china mate...
it's bad enough just interacting with the general population of this rapidly descending scum pit of a country , without having to try and make a difference.nuff said.
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#13
dui-lai said:
Rudolph_Hucker said:
I don't think there's anything in a plod's contract that requires them to lay down their lives for the public they serve.
I can't remember seeing one in our "contract" but we know if it came to it, we would have to :?
Its right at the bottom by the bit about lots of operational tours and losing your pensions in the near furure.
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#14
Trotsky said:
Hey Bladensburg,

Have you ever disarmed a guy with a knife on your own with no hope of backup? Have you fought with a man on a 9th roof top who was trying to throw himself off? Unarmed and surrounded by a jeering hostile crowd? Have you stopped three men coming out of the back of a bank at 0200 wondering if they are armed blaggers and you are going to get a kicking or more likely get shot.

I have not had a spectacular career but I have done all these things.

Many of my collegues have done much much more. At least two of people who worked close to me have been paralysed for life by police service. A friend of a friend went to an early grave, murdered by a mental patient. Don't you dare call the organisation I work for "self serving" you really have no idea what we do or why we do it.

Trotsky
Well said that man.
 
#15
seems that most firms like to opperate in this way. nine times out of ten the boss is so far removed from the day to day reality of getting the job done, that they think their crass comments are helping. personnally think the police have an unthankfull job, damned if they do, damned if they dont.
worlds gone PC mad. :(
 

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