Blue Badge Scheme extended to those with hidden disabilities.

#1
Next year people with mental health conditions including autism will qualify for the Blue Badge Scheme which will allow them preferential parking access including on some double yellow lines.

From what I have read the move seems to be an attempt to avoid litigation by lawyers claiming discrimination rather than an attempt to improve access for the disabled person.

Are people with clinical depression, for example made more unwell by having to walk a bit further to get to the shops?

The BBC interviewed a single mum with six kids on the issue. All of the kids were diagnosed with autism, which apparently made their behaviour 'challenging'. She was all for it as it would lower the stress the family was subject to in finding a parking space whilst on days out.

Anecdotally I note a lot of these families with autistic kids seem to lack an adult male in the family, but that's another topic.

Blue badge scheme to provide ‘lifeline’ for mentally ill people
 
#2
This is the right they removed 4 years ago and now they are trying to make us think they are nice and considerate people.
 
#3
Next year people with mental health conditions including autism will qualify for the Blue Badge Scheme which will allow them preferential parking access including on some double yellow lines.

From what I have read the move seems to be an attempt to avoid litigation by lawyers claiming discrimination rather than an attempt to improve access for the disabled person.

Are people with clinical depression, for example made more unwell by having to walk a bit further to get to the shops?

The BBC interviewed a single mum with six kids on the issue. All of the kids were diagnosed with autism, which apparently made their behaviour 'challenging'. She was all for it as it would lower the stress the family was subject to in finding a parking space whilst on days out.

Anecdotally I note a lot of these families with autistic kids seem to lack an adult male in the family, but that's another topic.

Blue badge scheme to provide ‘lifeline’ for mentally ill people
No, lets talk about your anecdote, its an adecdote and nothing more. The incidence of autism is purely random, albiet that it affects more males than females.
It's also worth remembering that the autistic kids you mention (so a majority of males) will grow up to be the adult females, and adult males you speak of ;)
 
#4
Depression is a killer, and is severely misunderstood by the majority of people, including a lot of the medical profession. anything that makes sufferers of severe depression lives more tolerable is good in my book.
 
#5
Next year people with mental health conditions including autism will qualify for the Blue Badge Scheme which will allow them preferential parking access including on some double yellow lines.

From what I have read the move seems to be an attempt to avoid litigation by lawyers claiming discrimination rather than an attempt to improve access for the disabled person.

Are people with clinical depression, for example made more unwell by having to walk a bit further to get to the shops?

The BBC interviewed a single mum with six kids on the issue. All of the kids were diagnosed with autism, which apparently made their behaviour 'challenging'. She was all for it as it would lower the stress the family was subject to in finding a parking space whilst on days out.

Anecdotally I note a lot of these families with autistic kids seem to lack an adult male in the family, but that's another topic.

Blue badge scheme to provide ‘lifeline’ for mentally ill people
The Blue badge should only be for those who cannot physically negotiate public areas easily, simple. If there is one spot available who gets it? The person in the wheelchair or the mum with the kid with this weeks flavour of mental disorder/diagnosis of abnormal behaviour? My guess is they’d side with the mum because it’s a child after all....
 
#7
Anecdotally I note a lot of these families with autistic kids seem to lack an adult male in the family, but that's another topic.
To this specific point, autism has a proven increased likelihood to run through the male line, ie an autistic child has a higher chance their father is also autistic. So anecdotally, you're anecdote is wrong :)
As for the blue badge bit, as the father of an autistic son (yes I know, but despite certain problems I've never looked to be diagnosed myself). My lad is 23 and after several years basically stopping in his room he started to make progress, learned to drive and last year managed to get an apprenticeship in a civil engineering role. If providing a blue badge to enable an autistic person helps then I guess it helps. Would it have ever helped my lad? - I doubt it, no one solution works for all autistic people. Remember an autistic child will become an autistic adult who may learn coping strategies (great) or may struggle all their life
 
#8
Severe depression and anxiety often come together.
Some people suffer so badly that they never leave their home.
If it makes them get out and about more its all good.
Able bodied and people not suffering from these conditions are more than able to walk the extra distance, often not more than a few yards.
I do think that the amount of spaces allocated, especially in supermarket car parks, to the disabled is disprapportianate though.
 
#9
Anecdotally I note a lot of these families with autistic kids seem to lack an adult male in the family, but that's another topic.
You may be due a Nobel prize. I doubt that they even considered that. You will be showered in thanks by those whom autism has touched. Lack an adult male. You're great
 
#10
The Blue badge should only be for those who cannot physically negotiate public areas easily, simple. If there is one spot available who gets it? The person in the wheelchair or the mum with the kid with this weeks flavour of mental disorder/diagnosis of abnormal behaviour? My guess is they’d side with the mum because it’s a child after all....
Major fail in your reasoning there. If you suffer from a major medical mental disability then you may appear to be able to physically negotiate any given surroundings but mentally it is impossible for the sufferer.
 
#12
Remember an autistic child will become an autistic adult who may learn coping strategies (great) or may struggle all their life
I was diagnosed at age 41

I had never really figured out why I felt so uncomfortable in situations were others seemed entirely happy. You're right about coping mechanism, but Its often daft stuff thats a real challenge - like I'll end up going to the shops late at night, on my own, when ts quiet - I simply cant handle busy environments like supermarkets and shopping centres.

Recent developments have been a godsend for someone like me, like internet shopping, pay at pump at petrol stations and the wetherspooons app so you can order food and drinks to the table) - it allows me to be a supremely antisocial bastard and still get stuff done without getting myself wound into a spring.

I certainly do know aspies that wouldn't go out at all if it wasn't for stuff like this - I'll confess to having found myself sitting outside a shop for half an hour till it quietens down, and I can see a busy car park would be a real challenge with autistic kids
 
#13
awesome, I’ll now find it even harder to find a space I can get my wheelchair out in.

But at least the people who don’t need that space are being looked after.
 

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#14
As far as I am concerned, the blue badge scheme exists for those who have restricted mobility. I'm not talking about the overweight munters seen blocking pavements in their mobility scooter; I mean those with a genuine lack of mobility due to lack of limbs or deformation of limbs.
Those who have mental issues ( I am being treated for depression myself) are not physically unable to use normal transport and should not be allowed blue badge status.
Where does this stop? Do we give blue badges to people who have tourettes? They obviously have a mental issue.
This is luvvyism going to far!
 
#15
Major fail in your reasoning there. If you suffer from a major medical mental disability then you may appear to be able to physically negotiate any given surroundings but mentally it is impossible for the sufferer.
If you are unable to negotiate public parking because of too much going on in your head, or afraid demons are going to shove you in a car boot if you’re not close enough to the shops doors, maybe you shouldn’t be driving, that’s the purpose of taxis or friends dropping you off....
 
#16
It's not a fuckin' competition.

I expect we'll soon have 3,000 fuckin' experts here opining on who should and shouldn't be helped, dependent on their own biases.

There's always someone pontificating on how others ought to live. Motes and stuff.
 
#17
I was diagnosed at age 41

I had never really figured out why I felt so uncomfortable in situations were others seemed entirely happy. You're right about coping mechanism, but Its often daft stuff thats a real challenge - like I'll end up going to the shops late at night, on my own, when ts quiet - I simply cant handle busy environments like supermarkets and shopping centres.

Recent developments have been a godsend for someone like me, like internet shopping, pay at pump at petrol stations and the wetherspooons app so you can order food and drinks to the table) - it allows me to be a supremely antisocial bastard and still get stuff done without getting myself wound into a spring.

I certainly do know aspies that wouldn't go out at all if it wasn't for stuff like this - I'll confess to having found myself sitting outside a shop for half an hour till it quietens down, and I can see a busy car park would be a real challenge with autistic kids
I shared a house many moons ago with a family and their teenager with autism. Sorry to be so blunt but I don't have another way of saying "autism" :)

What I learned, after a lifetime of ignorance and prejudice against non-obvious and hidden disabilities, was that this kid couldn't even walk down the road without freaking out. Certain situations, crowds, colours and objects would set her off. Besides distressing for her it was distressing for her parents and those nearby. To my mind, she might have been able to walk and function relatively normally physical wise, yet her illness or condition affected her and her carers' lives considerably, to the point of misery.

I am not sure that people with mental health conditions including autism should qualify for the Blue Badge Scheme allowing them special parking allowances. Yet I can understand that it may be helpful to people enduring severe autism, personally or because of someone else, through no fault of their own. And it's about time the government and society did more than moan and begrudge these people assistance.
 
#18
If you are unable to negotiate public parking because of too much going on in your head, or afraid demons are going to shove you in a car boot if you’re not close enough to the shops doors, maybe you shouldn’t be driving, that’s the purpose of taxis or friends dropping you off....
The person with the badge doesn't need to be the driver, there was a blind lady at a gym I used to attend, she also didn't have any arms, I have to say that it never crossed my mind as to whether a blind lady drove herself to the gym!
;)
 
#19
awesome, I’ll now find it even harder to find a space I can get my wheelchair out in.

But at least the people who don’t need that space are being looked after.
I know from reading your posts that you have had some very serious injuries that are obvious to anyone.
But people are waking up to the fact that some are not so obvious.
As an aside my mother has had a blue badge for the last six months due to serious complications after surgery including an amputation, although not nearly as serious as yours.
It has sat in a drawer, the blue badge, not her foot, and not yet used. I can see it being useful as you can get an exemption from the congestion charge/ Dartford crossing, but you have to register and pay them a tenner first.
As I suffer from depression I have no reason/ motivation to venture out and use it.
As I said earlier mental illness is a killer and widely misunderstood.
 
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#20
I'm puzzled, the first extract includes people who physically can't do the distance, which is already the case. How the medics are going to judge the 'very considerable psychological' aspect of it? I foresee a lot of people with statemented kids who will have to have a blue badge to get Wayne and Chardonnay to school, handy for shopping too. School runs are bad now wait until this goes into effect.

They will also include those who cannot do so without it causing them “very considerable psychological distress and those [who] have very considerable difficulty when walking”.

Second extract, if the possibility of no parking space stops people going out, why would a blue badge guarantee a parking space? You still can't leave the house.

The possibility of not being able to find a parking space near where you’re going can mean you can’t contemplate leaving the house at all.

From my little experience of autism and the like, the sufferers often seem to like routine and habit. What happens when their usual parking spot is taken?
 

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