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Bloody Sunday Compensation

  • Thread starter allgone2ratsh1t
  • Start date
#21
If they deserve payment then so do the soldiers who's lives were****ed up by PTSD while serving in the province, who's group action was kicked out of court by the f@cking Labour Government
They do, in the form of a war pension.

The families of those killed in the province receive war widows pensions (if married)

Theer are and have been for many years, schemes in place for servicemen suffering as a result of service.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#22
They do, in the form of a war pension.

The families of those killed in the province receive war widows pensions (if married)

Theer are and have been for many years, schemes in place for servicemen suffering as a result of service.
Given that PIRA was the Military wing of Sinn Fein, are they not as liable as the MOD (who are, apparently, the military wing of HMG). If we cannot sue PIRA then we should sue Sinn Fein for all civilian casualties caused by PIRA. I am sure the banana republic of Eire would be delighted to help in such a worthy cause.
 
#23
"The widow of one of the victims and mother of eight children, Mrs Ita McKinney, is to receive more than £13,000 from the government.

She said: "I will accept the money on behalf of my children. It will not make any difference to my life. I have lost my husband, things will still be the same."

Conservative MP John Biggs-Davison spoke out against the awards. He questioned whether relatives of troops injured in a similar situation would have received as much compensation. "

Wasn't £13,000 enough compensation? It was paid out in the 1970's when £2K would have bought you a house.
 
#24
The MOD has announced it is to pay compenSation to the victims of Bloody Sunday.

So does this mean that Sinn Fein will pay compensation to victims of PIRA?
i wouldnt want a gov who felt that they only had to live up to the standards of Sinn Fein and the PIRA. this is the right thing to do, we killed innocent people on bloody sunday, as a responsible nation we should pay for it.
 
#26
They do, in the form of a war pension.

The families of those killed in the province receive war widows pensions (if married)

Theer are and have been for many years, schemes in place for servicemen suffering as a result of service.
partially true and it's a f@cking pittance,but if there was any justice in this world those injured in Northern Ireland should have at least a percentage of what is available to the injured now
 
#28
well not exactly, but i would've been willing to go. and for that reason i feel i should qualify for the GSM NI.you know what i mean though

Are you serious?

According to your logic,I would have be willing to assasinate OBL, therefore, I should get the $20 million bounty on his head.

Am I missing the point here?
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#29
Not in the least bit surprised by this. I said it ages ago and I'll say it again. If they'd said years ago. 'Sorry it was a terrible thing. we were wrong, here's £50,000 each. It would have been a lot cheaper.It would have drawn the sting of the massive Derry PIRA mobilisation and the Widgery ballocks and the subsequent inquiry wouldn't have been necessary.
The previous week the Paras kicked the living shit out of a protest on Magilligan beach, how anyone thought it was sensible to use them again is beyond me. Even the peelers advised letting the march go ahead. The fault lies with whoever came up with the idea of 'teaching the young hooligans a lesson'. Grumpy because the Derry crowd were probably the most talented streetfighters and rioters the Army had ever seen. A complete balls up. Coming soon The Ballymurphy Massacre compensation claim that's been boiling for the last year or so.
 
#30

We as in the United Kingdom did. We have to acknowledge that.

Nobody but nobdy would describe the actions of 1 Para as murder, it was not premediated but blind panic. An action displaying poor leadership, and zero understanding of the situation by a group of guys shipped up to Londonderry to show what they could do. Compensation for those that served in Banner and claim trauma? I doubt this would happen, you'd get every wee urchin that got shouted at by a squaddie coming forward too.

Now Bokkatankie if you want to reflect in the glory of your rugby team, or your regiment, it should not be too big a step to acknowledge that your army, ie we did wrong by a group of innocent people.
 
#31
i'm kind of new to it all in NI, i did a tour in 2004. the first impression i got was the catholic side always bleating on about being hard done by, this shit still goes on with them.
it pisses me off as i cant understand why the slugs in charge always apologise and throw money at em. what the fck are they so scared of? if we are such a brilliant army why dont we sort em out once and for all
 
#32
Are you serious?

According to your logic,I would have be willing to assasinate OBL, therefore, I should get the $20 million bounty on his head.

Am I missing the point here?
yeah, by a mile.

i was refering to the multiple threads where people moan about medals they either dont qualify for or that dont even exist.
 
#33
and soldiers should be able to sue the cnuts, guess thats the difference between us and them
we have to get on with it they get there own way and profit from it
 
#35
From to-days Guardian

Bloody Sunday compensation could open door for other payouts

Families of those killed on all sides during the Troubles may take up civil claims once this precedent is set

Victims of state violence and paramilitaries on both sides during the Troubles may now seek compensation. Photograph: Alex

Costing nearly £200m, the Bloody Sunday investigation was the most expensive and longest running inquiry in British legal history.

Amounting to millions of words the inquiry laid out in scientific detail the minute by minute events on that fateful day in January 1972 which led to the biggest massacre of civilians by the British military since Peterloo.

The shooting dead of 13 unarmed civilians (a 14th died in hospital) following a civil rights march left an indelible scar on the city and drove hundreds, perhaps thousands of young recruits into the arms of the Provisional IRA.

For three decades, the families of those who died fought a dogged campaign to clear the names of the victims and to establish an internationally recognised tribunal into the atrocity carried out by the Parachute Regiment.

But when David Cameron stood up in the House of Commons in June 2010 and roundly condemned the killings labelling them "wrong", his historic statement seemed to draw some kind of line under the past. The fact that it was a Conservative prime minister who had acknowledged the innocence of those that died on Bloody Sunday was all the more poignant given that it was a previous Tory government under Ted Heath that had ordered the paratroopers into Derry's Bogside that day.

Now the Ministry of Defence has said that it will be compensating those families and victims still around after nearly four decades. On a practical level the compensation process may be complicated because many of those wounded on Bloody Sunday are dead and even some relatives of those killed have themselves passed away.

The figures available will of course be much more than the hundreds of pounds the army paid out back in the 1970s to some of the families without the military accepting any blame. Moreover, the payouts will focus wider attention on other potential compensation areas – eg from victims of state violence during the Troubles. Those directly injured or who had loved ones shot dead by the British army may also seek recompense once the Bloody Sunday payouts commence. That picture would be complicated further if the families of those killed by loyalist paramilitaries seek compensation. Those who argue that the police or army colluded or helped the loyalists target them or their loved ones could also sue the state once this precedent is set.

On the other side, some victims of terrorist organisations have attempted to sue suspected paramilitary leaders in the civil courts most notably the families of the Omagh bomb victims. They successfully used a landmark civil action against several Real IRA suspects whom they were able to name and shame through the courts. Although in this case the Omagh families were less concerned with compensation but rather a desire to get to the truth about the 1998 massacre — the single biggest of the Troubles.

Separately, there have also been moves by victims injured in IRA bombs and attacks to sued the now-toppled regime of the Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in Libya over the dictators' logistical support for the IRA. It is expected the new Libyan government will compensate these victims in the near future.

Finally, the prospect of Martin McGuinness as president of Ireland following October's election in the Republic also holds out an interesting prospect. Were the former IRA chief-of-staff to become president, would unionist victims of the IRA seek retrospectively to sue him and the state he would head for crimes committed while he was an IRA commander
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#36
We as in the United Kingdom did. We have to acknowledge that.

Nobody but nobdy would describe the actions of 1 Para as murder, it was not premediated but blind panic. An action displaying poor leadership, and zero understanding of the situation by a group of guys shipped up to Londonderry to show what they could do. Compensation for those that served in Banner and claim trauma? I doubt this would happen, you'd get every wee urchin that got shouted at by a squaddie coming forward too.


I'm not sure which is worse Premeditation or Paras acting in 'Blind Panic'
Premeditation and paras in one sentence is a rare sight. As is blind panic. If every other regiment which served behaved in a similar manner. Northern Ireland would be a lot emptier (Waiting on the predictable response) But we didn't, despite some fairly intense and heavy duty provocation. Paras, only good for dropping on Germans.

Last squaddie who shouted at me spent the next minutes bright pink and apologising profusely.
 
#37
We as in the United Kingdom did. We have to acknowledge that.

Nobody but nobdy would describe the actions of 1 Para as murder, it was not premediated but blind panic. An action displaying poor leadership, and zero understanding of the situation by a group of guys shipped up to Londonderry to show what they could do. Compensation for those that served in Banner and claim trauma? I doubt this would happen, you'd get every wee urchin that got shouted at by a squaddie coming forward too.

I'm not sure which is worse Premeditation or Paras acting in 'Blind Panic'
Premeditation and paras in one sentence is a rare sight. As is blind panic. If every other regiment which served behaved in a similar manner. Northern Ireland would be a lot emptier (Waiting on the predictable response) But we didn't, despite some fairly intense and heavy duty provocation. Paras, only good for dropping on Germans.

Last squaddie who shouted at me spent the next minutes bright pink and apologising profusely.
You chucked your strawberry milkshake over him?
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#38
We as in the United Kingdom did. We have to acknowledge that.

Nobody but nobdy would describe the actions of 1 Para as murder, it was not premediated but blind panic. An action displaying poor leadership, and zero understanding of the situation by a group of guys shipped up to Londonderry to show what they could do. Compensation for those that served in Banner and claim trauma? I doubt this would happen, you'd get every wee urchin that got shouted at by a squaddie coming forward too.

Now Bokkatankie if you want to reflect in the glory of your rugby team, or your regiment, it should not be too big a step to acknowledge that your army, ie we did wrong by a group of innocent people.
So as a citizen of the UK do I have to acknowledge that every murder in history is also my fault.

If individual soldiers acted in a criminal and murderous way they should be tried for it.

I see no reason why, I or anyone else should be paying compensation to their victims. The big difference between UK Armed Forces and PIRA was that our policy was not to indiscriminately murder innocent civillians. If that happened on Bloody Sunday, individual soldiers (as in Baha Mussa) should be charged and convicted for it.
 
#39
So as a citizen of the UK do I have to acknowledge that every murder in history is also my fault.

No don't be silly. But the state must accept responsibility and liability. But you can't espouse "we" in one sense then disown it in another. We the citizens of the UK acknowledge we did wrongly in 1972. We as taxpayers acknowledge this by paying compensation.

Take you argument on compensation further, is it only those involved directly that should recompense victims? In which case Mengele and company could never have given remotely what the government of the FRG gave to holocaust victims, or the criminal compensation board is useless and pointless as Fred the penniless mugger shoud pay for his victim's trauma and disability. Of course not as Fred will never be able to compensate to the level deemed fit.
 
#40
any soldier who is deployed on ops is an extension of the UK gov. like i said earlier as a responsible nation we should pay (and as mentioned by others if we hadnt tried to ignore it for 40 years it would've been cheaper) our governments decisions should not be decided by the policy of Sinn Fein or the PIRA.
 

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