Blood Pressure

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by pjs86, May 9, 2007.

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  1. Hello all, I'm not sure whether this has been dealt with anywhere else on the site, but this seemed to be the appropriate forum so thought I would crack on.

    I am a 20yo male approaching final stages of selection - Army Officer Selection Main Board in one month. Recent injections for a trip to Nepal have led to me having my blood pressure measured, which has come back as slightly high. However GP is 97% certain this rating is due to 'white coat' nerves; i.e. tension inherent in visiting doctors surgery.

    I am booked in for a blood test and the chances of me having anything remotely wrong with me are very slim. However, just in case, I was wondering if anybody could shed some light on the Army's medical guidelines for accepting candidates with high blood pressure. Mine is in the region of 145/80, is there a cut off point above or below me? I realise this is no substitute for visiting my GP and do not intend it to be, he was unsure of military guidelines hence my enquirey here.

    I am in no way medically trained and so do not know the implications, but I am very fit - going for a few extra runs would not make a difference to my level of health.

    Thank you for your help.
  2. I'm not medically trained either, but have been in a similar situation.

    First, "white coat syndrome" is extremely common, and can be allowed for/got around by competent doctors and nurses. Not a worry.

    Secondly, your jabs for Nepal - if relevant - are something your GP should mention in a note to the army doctor.

    As a general principle, if your BP tends to be somewhat elevated but there is no underlying disease - ie if you have "essential hypertension" - it can normally be wholly controlled by means of one beta-blocker tablet per day, or similar, which ought not to disbar you from army service.

    Good luck with your Board!
  3. mine averages 96/50 on a good day!!! you have no problem
  4. 145/80 is a tad high for a fit young male but I suspect if you were doing much fizz daily, it would soon either fall to a more middle of the road figure or you would find out why it had risen!! Probably the white coat syndrome explanation and vaccine thing contributed. Actually that is not a massively high BP, unless you are an Olympic skier in which case your VO2 uptake requirement might be beyond your heart's capabilities. What was your pulse incidentally?
  5. Thanks for the responses so far. Cuddles, have just checked my heart rate and it is 58 - in line with the 'white coat syndrome' I would imagine it was slightly elavated whilst BP was being taken.
  6. If in doubt for any reason buy one of the inexpensive monitors, say an Omron and run checks regularly at different times of the day, avoiding meals, and of course drinking bouts. My wife and I did this after a number of problems with doctors and hospitals, and wanting to avoid medication that was unnecessary and possibly damaging (I am chemically sensitive). Record the readings and look for the Mean (NOT the average) after a fair run of days. This will give you the full picture and you can show the results to the doctors. They will be just as, and may be more reliable, than those taken randomly in occasional surgeries by busy staff.
  7. I had exactly the same problem. My own gp got me to monitor my BP at home for ten days. Based on my results he wrote to the Army to say i was fit to train. They were happy to accept that.
  8. I have had a blood test and 24hr blood pressure monitoring conducted since my first post - blood test came back clear and blood pressure is within normal healthy limits.

    Mean BP = 127/83 with a pulse of 59. At one stage it went down to 87/51 with a pulse of 41 so there is a fair amount of variation, which I am assured is normal.

    I have a print out of my results which I will show the Doctor conducting my medical.

    Once again, many thanks to all who posted. My mind is set at ease!
  9. mate, i had the same problem at my medical. my resting pulse was 55 and the doc was pleased with that. my bp was a little high but he put that down to having just finished a night shift hence no sleep and nerves. he brought me back on the sunday after a good sleep as it was better. shouldnt be a problem mate..good luck with your training