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Blood pressure drop - does this sound believable?

ugly

LE
Moderator
Glad you're sorted, but I wonder how many docs would think of something like that?
Not many in my experience, I had to get a neurologist to find mine.
In regards to high BP, I wouldn't panic, it only makes it worse. one of readings are just that, overly high and you get the joy of the 3 day machine which generally shows if there is a problem other than white coat syndrome.
 
My missus had high BP last year (showing something like 160/95) at the GP. The doc gave her some type of pill to reduce it.
I bought an Omron machine from the pharmacy to keep an eye on it and was getting something like 130/80 on average without the tablets,
Back to doc for checkup and whoosh, 165/95. Back home, BP was 125/80.
Now on her records as white coat syndrome and, each time she goes for a check, i have to take it at home and show the doc.

Doc reckons that, at her age (71) she has to keep the BP below 150/90 and if it gets that high for a couple of days then to start taking the tablets and go back to see her.

The machine has an orange light that lights up if it is 135/85 or higher and, by cutting back on certain foods, she is showing around 120/75. Only thing with the Omron is that is can be quite contradictory. I can take her BP and it'll show quite high at about 140/85 but, 5 minutes later, 120/75. I now take it 3 times within 10 minutes and we use an average of those 3 readings. Also gives a good heart rate reading as well which is a good indication.

Also advised by the doc to take it first thing in the morning after getting up as the machine will give different readings throughout the day and the morning one is the best after resting.

We tried one of the wrist ones and, to be honest, the reading were so haywire and contradictory that we reverted to the Omron arm cuff.
 
The wearable fitness devices that also monitor heart rate can give interesting readings during such times.

Allegedly

I can't comment on reading ambulatory BP/ECG results while working in Phys measures (rinteln and Gosport)
Not many people out down what they were actually doing for certain activities
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I can't comment on reading ambulatory BP/ECG results while working in Phys measures (rinteln and Gosport)
Not many people out down what they were actually doing for certain activities

Did the wrist one show they'd wanked 75 miles?
 
The wearable fitness devices that also monitor heart rate can give interesting readings during such times.

Allegedly
I've pushed my wife's Fitbit into the danger zone a couple of times. Not that she's complaining.
 
There is the "White Coat Syndrome" that your BP is higher when medics are messing about with you. Years ago I had a similar drop, 140-ish to 120 in a very short time after an effort to get more exercise and less food. It didn't take much to get that result.
I recently had surgery with a local anaesthetic in an OR staffed by peeps in plastic biohazard suits and oxygen tanks. My BP was 225/190, so add "Andromeda Strain Syndrome" to that.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I recently had surgery with a local anaesthetic in an OR staffed by peeps in plastic biohazard suits and oxygen tanks. My BP was 225/190, so add "Andromeda Strain Syndrome" to that.

Probably as bad on the other side of the PPE.

We are currently expected to perform surgeries that previously we would have used loupes for magnification.

Now we have to do them without such aids and with a horrible cheap visor with all manner of reflection and refraction going on.
Also for fun, we're double gloved to ensure a lack of manual dexterity.
And won't mention the FFP3 masks which reduces communication.
And gowns manufactured by the cheapest bidder from the cheapest material that fit no one.
 
Probably as bad on the other side of the PPE.

We are currently expected to perform surgeries that previously we would have used loupes for magnification.

Now we have to do them without such aids and with a horrible cheap visor with all manner of reflection and refraction going on.
Also for fun, we're double gloved to ensure a lack of manual dexterity.
And won't mention the FFP3 masks which reduces communication.
And gowns manufactured by the cheapest bidder from the cheapest material that fit no one.
Heard as much from our neighbour, a pediatrician who was training to be a pediatric surgeon but all that is cancelled until further notice as the practical lessons are now impractical.
 
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