Blood Group Badges

#3
Honestly don't think they're issued but seem to be 'local manufacture' originally and now done by every Tom, Dick and Webtex in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours.

Open to correction by the Gurus', however.
 
#5
para_medic said:
Beats the stigma of a tattoo though...
I'll have you know my regi number, blood group and zap looks very tasteful on my fore arm....

Only slightly offset by the doves on my hands, and the "cut here" accros my neck....

Oh, and "TAKE FIVE" on my fingers.

For that subtle pride in my regiment look, I have a life size capbadge on my back.
 
#6
chocolate_frog said:
para_medic said:
Beats the stigma of a tattoo though...
I'll have you know my regi number, blood group and zap looks very tasteful on my fore arm....

Only slightly offset by the doves on my hands, and the "cut here" accros my neck....

Oh, and "TAKE FIVE" on my fingers.

For that subtle pride in my regiment look, I have a life size capbadge on my back.
What, no stars on your face? Ya big jessie! :D
 
#9
I'm not able to say what happens in the sharp end in military hospitals (I'd be interested if anyone can inform me), but I do know for a fact that in any NHS hospital, NO blood transfusion would be given (except for the two units of O neg kept for such an emergency) without a minimum of a quick crossmatch, REGARDLESS of what was tattooed on the casualties arm, painted on their motorcycle helmet, or written in their passport.

If the incorrect blood type is given, there is I seem to recall, at random a 1 in 5 chance of it being fatal. If they are incompatible groups, then the resulting reaction will probably be fatal.

What's the current view from ops?
 
#11
steveh said:
chocolate_frog said:
para_medic said:
Beats the stigma of a tattoo though...
I'll have you know my regi number, blood group and zap looks very tasteful on my fore arm....

Only slightly offset by the doves on my hands, and the "cut here" accros my neck....

Oh, and "TAKE FIVE" on my fingers.

For that subtle pride in my regiment look, I have a life size capbadge on my back.
I'll echo that squire have my AB POS on my right wrist (now slightly obsceured by my H for H wrist band ) and my 2466**** on my left upper arm
2466#### - sprog!
 
#12
flamingo said:
I'm not able to say what happens in the sharp end in military hospitals (I'd be interested if anyone can inform me), but I do know for a fact that in any NHS hospital, NO blood transfusion would be given (except for the two units of O neg kept for such an emergency) without a minimum of a quick crossmatch, REGARDLESS of what was tattooed on the casualties arm, painted on their motorcycle helmet, or written in their passport.

If the incorrect blood type is given, there is I seem to recall, at random a 1 in 5 chance of it being fatal. If they are incompatible groups, then the resulting reaction will probably be fatal.

What's the current view from ops?

Regardless of velcro patches, tattoos or writing on helmet covers blood is NEVER given without cross matching being done. Might not be their kit after all.
 
#15
Evilgoblin said:
flamingo said:
I'm not able to say what happens in the sharp end in military hospitals (I'd be interested if anyone can inform me), but I do know for a fact that in any NHS hospital, NO blood transfusion would be given (except for the two units of O neg kept for such an emergency) without a minimum of a quick crossmatch, REGARDLESS of what was tattooed on the casualties arm, painted on their motorcycle helmet, or written in their passport.

If the incorrect blood type is given, there is I seem to recall, at random a 1 in 5 chance of it being fatal. If they are incompatible groups, then the resulting reaction will probably be fatal.

What's the current view from ops?

Regardless of velcro patches, tattoos or writing on helmet covers blood is NEVER given without cross matching being done. Might not be their kit after all.
That's what I figured, but I wasn't sure if it was on dogtags and used from them. Thanks for that :D. Not my day-job any more, but I still take an interest!
 
#18
We don't believe dog tags either, you wouldn't be very surprised how many of them are wrong too. The only thing we pay attention to is if there is anything declaring an allergy.
 
#20
Thanks Evilgoblin! I thought that it might be the case. If you could find out the proportion of dog-tags that are wrong, you might have yourself a nice little article for "The Journal of Transfusion Medicine". They wet their pants for that kind of stuff!

Stainmaster, are you male or female, if female do you ever intend getting pregnant?

Type A can have A or O, Rh Neg can only have Rh Neg if Female, but if Male can have Pos in an emergency (as you are not going to get pregnant and have antibodies cross the placenta to attack the foetus)

There are about 35 other sub-groups that also get taken into account if there is time to do a full screen, but the ABO and Rh systems are the main ones.
 

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