Bloke on the Range videos

I take it that you aren't allowed to stick a sling on and somehow make use of it?
 

4(T)

LE


With a military Enfield there is really no alternative but to just rest the back of the wrist against the barricade, and use the grip of the left hand to control the rifle in the normal way.

This isn't actually a disadvantage as (a), pinning the rifle to the barricade in some way will affect the POI (and you really see this at the longer ranges; and (b) most clubs and ranges, at least in the UK, tend to have wibbly wobbly barricades that are not intended for any sort of support.

IIRC the spirit and intent of military "shooting around cover" was to select a suitable unsupported position (prone, kneeling, squatting, etc), but not to use the cover as a rest. Some of the comps derived from this don't allow you to rest the rifle on the obstacle (eg when shooting through loopholes at different heights in the "barricade").
 
I take it that you aren't allowed to stick a sling on and somehow make use of it?
You are, but I honestly can't see any advantage to it. Loads of comments are saying I should grip the sling like a downgrip, which means you have to punch the barricade. Can't see that working under recoil, on a round post, or while not wearing a glove. I'll try it next weekend when I get the opportunity :)

Also a point for 2gun / Brutality type matches: you *have* to have a sling on the rifle cos sometimes you're required to retain the rifle while doing something else. So the sling has to be set long enough to enable you to do that, which is far too long for using it for support, and I'm entirely skeptical that a conventional sling arrangement has any real benefit for support unless your elbow is on something (a modern sling that goes around your body and over the top of your left shoulder is a different matter, of course).
 
So how do you mount these Optic things anyway?

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That thing is L85 levels of heavy though... 3.85 kg dry (no mag, no optics)... Better balanced and with a *much* better control layout though, although you can't get at the gas system without serious unit armourer level effort... (the answer being that unless they get full of mud you don't need to touch them, but in a mil context getting full of mud is very much a thing...)
 
That thing is L85 levels of heavy though... 3.85 kg dry
That's slightly depressing, I always hoped that if they'd perhaps made bits of the L85 out of extruded aluminium rather than tinplate it would be both lighter and less cheap feeling.
 
L85 levels of heavy
If memory serves, the Mondragon (circa 1908, Swiss designed, saw service with the Mexican army) was not much different in weight to the L85.

This was a point made very forcibly at RMC Shrivenham, by Dan Rasschen (of Rasschen Bag fame) as he educated me and my little gang on the folly of demanding lighter weight combat weapons at the same time as demanding no compensating diminution of range/ accuracy/ lethality.

Newtonian phyics and all that: if the projectile has to go far and fast, it needs energy. If the energy is provided by a propellant, heat will be generated that needs to be dissipated somehow. Some of it may be lost through ejection of brass, but what remains needs a weapon of sufficient mass to act as heat sink, otherwise - in a fire fight - it will likely become literally too hot to handle.

Moral of this story (for me, anyways), is that Scotty had it right all along:

"Ye cannae break the laws a' Phyzzicks, Cap'n!!"
 

TamH70

MIA
That's slightly depressing, I always hoped that if they'd perhaps made bits of the L85 out of extruded aluminium rather than tinplate it would be both lighter and less cheap feeling.
Remember the SA80 has a long-assed and fairly thick in section barrel that goes back almost to the butt-plate. That's going to increase both the real and perceived weight of the weapon.

Things ain't going to get much lighter until carbon-fibre barrels become far more ubiquitous from what they are now.

 
Interesting choice. Only a true enthusiast (or, in my case, anyone who didn't know better) would pick it as a purchase.

The M17S is the only firearm I have ever sold. It is, as you mention, stupidly heavy, the rail is ungodly high, the backup sights have the same sight radius as a sidearm, I ended up using the money to buy an AXR. I do kindof regret it now, but mainly as a collector, and at the time I owned it, it was my only rifle, I hadn't started a collection. It in no way was a good rifle. I didn't even find it particularly reliable.

That said, even at the time (back around 2001), there was a bloke in Florida who would do custom work on the rifle, including lightening it a lot and playing with the trigger. It cost way too much money compared to what I had (again, I had to sell one rifle to buy another) Turns out when Bushmaster discontinued it, he bought the license, and the M17Ss he builds, to a modified design, are highly regarded, albeit certainly not cheap.
He also still does modification work to original M17Ss, so you can send yours to him for tweaking.
The 7.62mm particularly catches my attention, as an interesting alternative to the KelTec RFB or the Desert Tech MDR. For when I have money again and can start more arms-shopping
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