Bloke on the Range videos

4(T)

LE
For the folks that actually carried these as a personal weapon was it as handy as it looks? It's surprisingly tidy and small and with the stock folded it's really tiny.

Very handy. Would fit in the side pocket or bottom of a bergan, or in the "glove box" of a landrover.

Lots of people found it small enough to put somewhere and then lose it!


Good ergonomics. A common way to carry it was slung muzzle-down across the back. To bring it into action, all you had to do was reach behind with the right hand, grab the pistol grip, and slide it on the sling to the front.
 
The standard of your videos has improved dramatically since the first one.
A tip though: put your personal mic as close as you can to your mouth without being too much under the chin. Most personal mics are omnidirectional but will reduce a lot of background noise if they placed correctly. Also try to avoid auto-gain as this will push up the background when you're not talking.

Smithandjones seems to have been handed his buttocks by your viewership.
Thanks muchly :)

I tend to put the mic where I do cos I had bad times with it clipping if it was too close to my mouth. I don't use auto gain with the clip-on mic, that's just terrible and a nightmare, it's always manually set. It works pretty well with the internal sound though.
 
Thanks muchly :)

I tend to put the mic where I do cos I had bad times with it clipping if it was too close to my mouth. I don't use auto gain with the clip-on mic, that's just terrible and a nightmare, it's always manually set. It works pretty well with the internal sound though.
The audio is actually pretty good and didn't appear to have AGC in. I only mentioned the mic position because you referenced the background noise although I didn't notice it as being obtrusive. In any case, you are on a shooting range.

I'm glad you're still using the music!
 
Smithandjones seems to have been handed his buttocks by your viewership.
Good to hear - I hadn't been back in to look, for my own sanity! :D
 

HE117

LE
Good to hear - I hadn't been back in to look, for my own sanity! :D
What he is saying is not wrong, however the way he is saying it is. He is correct in that the UK practice was to load with the working parts forward, and then cock on the command "ready", as we all know!

In reality, I don't think there is a lot in it.. and frankly shooting as an experienced individual on a range it's up to you if the RCO is happy.

What I do object to is the gonad driven approach to range management that seems to have been favoured by the skillies over the past decades. You are not going to teach anyone anything by frightening the bejasus out of them. As I may have reflected in the past, the Shit & Shovel Corps have deteriorated greatly over the decades and the level of actual firearms knowledge has fallen dramatically.

Don't get me started on the left hand/right hand cocking and forward assist bollox.. if S&S allow the speshul people to jap slap their HKs whilst waving the muzzle all over the place, then frankly what t. f. is the point?
 
What he is saying is not wrong, however the way he is saying it is. He is correct in that the UK practice was to load with the working parts forward, and then cock on the command "ready", as we all know!
Of course... but then the default position of the working parts in the military is forward, for good military reasons. On a civilian range, it's rearwards. For pure safety reasons. And there's no point in using the trigger to drop the bolt (under control) and then to do a load, and then a make ready (passing through that "gun can go off on its own if you slip" state) just because some NCO of the type that put Deepcut on the map likes getting shouty and has never been on a civvy range in his life :D
 

HE117

LE
Of course... but then the default position of the working parts in the military is forward, for good military reasons. On a civilian range, it's rearwards. For pure safety reasons. And there's no point in using the trigger to drop the bolt (under control) and then to do a load, and then a make ready (passing through that "gun can go off on its own if you slip" state) just because some NCO of the type that put Deepcut on the map likes getting shouty and has never been on a civvy range in his life :D
Oh.. don't I know it! You have always to be very careful of cadres tasked with training folk with a higher IQ..! Don't get me started on Deepcut!

Context, as they say, is everything!
 
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Tyk

LE
Interesting vid. While I was aware the rifle had a lightweight barrel from some of Ian's vids I didn't realise it would have such a marked effect on point of impact with the supporting methods commonly used.
 
Well if you've done the Sterling at "extended range", why not do a STEN?

 
Military History Visualised has released an... interesting video that touches on your area of interest:
Not sure he's quite got why the K98k getting hot might be a bad thing...

Mind you, I've found his history tends to be rather Wehrmacht (and US) -centric and like many Americans he doesn't seem to consider the British/Commonwealth experience very much.
 
Unfortunately the internet and YouTube especially is now plagued with gamers that burst forth their expert opinions on anything military or firearms related despite having never left their bedroom except when mum puts the Hoover round.
 

HE117

LE
Would you please tell me where the range shown in the video is located.
I'm sure the question has been asked before however I cannot find any reference.
Switzerland...
 
Thing is that on a service range you'd have the bolts closed at all times unless made ready or carrying out NSP's. Whereas on a civvy range we have bolts open at all times when we're not firing. Anyone doing mil drills on a civvy range, with bolt forward (Stgw 57 is an exception cos there's no hold-open but there's a loaded chamber indicator) other than on the firing point would get a rocket. And I see no reason to unnecessarily drop the bolt only to do a less-safe load and make ready the military way. I'm just shooting it, not demonstrating drills!

And I have no idea where he gets the idea from that loading with the bolt back is a higher ND risk. Shows a lack of faith in, and indeed a lack of understanding of, the gun and how it operates.
I've read that in the US range protocol on firing open bolt weapons is to have the bolt to the rear and a chamber block applied, a colourful plastic(?) plug that drops in and prevents the bolt entering battery and is visibly safe.

I first witnessed it on a clip of a guy going full auto with a Lanchester and after firing he inserts a block in a very deliberate and obvious way. Leaving everyone around in no doubt as to the state of the weapon. Failure to do so could get you kicked off the range for unsafe practices.

It seems a bit belt and braces safety wise but when you've got groups of people, not necessarily practiced shooters on an automatic shooting jolly you'd want to take extra precaution.
 
I've read that in the US range protocol on firing open bolt weapons is to have the bolt to the rear and a chamber block applied, a colourful plastic(?) plug that drops in and prevents the bolt entering battery and is visibly safe.

I first witnessed it on a clip of a guy going full auto with a Lanchester and after firing he inserts a block in a very deliberate and obvious way. Leaving everyone around in no doubt as to the state of the weapon. Failure to do so could get you kicked off the range for unsafe practices.

It seems a bit belt and braces safety wise but when you've got groups of people, not necessarily practiced shooters on an automatic shooting jolly you'd want to take extra precaution.
Chamber flags are a fairly common thing on ranges full stop, on both sides of the Atlantic. They've been mandatory at Bisley (unless you take the bolt out) on the rifle ranges since well before my time.
 
Military History Visualised has released an... interesting video that touches on your area of interest:
Not sure he's quite got why the K98k getting hot might be a bad thing...

Mind you, I've found his history tends to be rather Wehrmacht (and US) -centric and like many Americans he doesn't seem to consider the British/Commonwealth experience very much.
I suspect he'd work it out very quickly if he actually had one in his hands, his sight picture went wobbly, he burned his fingers and the bolt started binding after 10-15 rounds of moderately rapid fire, lol.
 
I suspect he'd work it out very quickly if he actually had one in his hands, his sight picture went wobbly, he burned his fingers and the bolt started binding after 10-15 rounds of moderately rapid fire, lol.
Ah but they had horny hands back then... sounds a bit metoo to my mind.

It seems to me that there's probably a reason why they decided to put more wood on the SMLE than the "Long" Lee and that some of it might have been to do with experiences of rapid fire and heat. I have to say that I really have difficulty understanding why Third Reich stuff is held up as being universally brilliant when to my mind the Kar98 is a decidedly average battle rifle.
I have similar queries about the worship of the MG42, yes it's got a bloody terrifying rof and makes a nasty noise but - tripod mounted role notwithstanding - at a section level, off a bipod, is it all that much better than the Bren?
 
Ah but they had horny hands back then... sounds a bit metoo to my mind.

It seems to me that there's probably a reason why they decided to put more wood on the SMLE than the "Long" Lee and that some of it might have been to do with experiences of rapid fire and heat. I have to say that I really have difficulty understanding why Third Reich stuff is held up as being universally brilliant when to my mind the Kar98 is a decidedly average battle rifle.
I have similar queries about the worship of the MG42, yes it's got a bloody terrifying rof and makes a nasty noise but - tripod mounted role notwithstanding - at a section level, off a bipod, is it all that much better than the Bren?
The funny thing is that the worship of German kit seems to be a mostly US-ian thing, and the German shooters I've spoken to are under no illusions...

As a section wpn, and having had reasonable trigger time on both (more on MG3 than MG42 but same difference), the MG42 is decidedly inferior to the BREN - heavier, ammo carriage is a PITA, the BREN can be comfortably worked by 1 man whereas the MG42 really needs 2 (otherwise the reload is glacial and needs the butt to be dropped out of the shoulder), ammo consumption is considerable, they're less accurate in general and less stable in shooting bursts.

As a universal MG it's an entirely different matter, but just looking in the light role it's quite clear to me.
 
Chamber flags are a fairly common thing on ranges full stop, on both sides of the Atlantic. They've been mandatory at Bisley (unless you take the bolt out) on the rifle ranges since well before my time.
They are mandatory on full-bore ranges in Australia along with removal of the bolt. Small-bore require removal of bolt only.
 

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