Bloke on the Range videos

I've been watching BoTR's extended family making music

Scary looking bunch. The chick though, I definitely would!
 
As I watched that, I thought "Finns?"

And then "yes . . . . . and gills and webbed feet too, very likely" :thumleft:
They're singing in Russian :)
 
They're singing in Russian :)
No need to be picky!

I only speak four languages, and one of them's Gibberish.

Nor can I help what goes through my mind when I see a gang of half-dressed hillbillies singing furrin ditties whilst thwacking each other with bundles of twigs!
 
 
 
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
BP pellets. As a quick fix, I took a load of the 50 hole plastic divider plates from .22 boxes and small aluminium plates. I mixed fine BP into a slurry and filled the holes of one divider plate. Scraped off level and put on an aluminium plate. Put on the next plastic divider and repeat. Finally weighted down and set to dry. A quick flex of the divider and small pellets drop out.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

HE117

LE
BP pellets. As a quick fix, I took a load of the 50 hole plastic divider plates from .22 boxes and small aluminium plates. I mixed fine BP into a slurry and filled the holes of one divider plate. Scraped off level and put on an aluminium plate. Put on the next plastic divider and repeat. Finally weighted down and set to dry. A quick flex of the divider and small pellets drop out.
Yes, but unfortunately that process destroys the physical structure of the gunpowder, which is what gives it its performance. By creating a slurry you undo all the work of the incorporation mill and the corning process.

Originally pebble and prism powder were created by pressing meal powder from the incorporating mill in a huge press to form a solid mass. This was then cut and tumbled to produce pebble powder or pressed into hexagonal blocks for prism powder. The idea was to slow down the burning rate in large calibre guns. This is not what you want in small calibre guns or for testing alcohol..

The powder pellets produced by Dynamit Nobel are actually made from corned powder, pressed together with some sort of binding agent. When the flame from the primer hits them, they break up almost immediately creating a large surface area. Using pebble or prism type pellets would be burning all the way down the barrel, which in an ML Pistol, would be a "bad thing"!

You need to find a binding agent that will not break down the corned structure of the BP grains, but be consumed in the ignition event.. possibly hair spray might be worth trying, although I suspect modern versions contain a flame retardant, which would not be helpful... not that I am advocating you actually trying this you understand!
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
At the time, I only had fine powder which was not suitable for my 11 bore matchlock. The pellets worked OK but as the gun has no sights, accuracy could not be assessed.
 
The Winchester/1911 Combo looked like fun,wonder how it would have gone using an Winchester 1895 instead of the 1873?
I believe the 1895 has a much longer lever throw due to the way the action works, making it slower and more cumbersome to operate. I don't recall if they mention this in the video or not. You would lose a lot of the advantages of having an action which was designed to handle relatively short cartridges.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I believe the 1895 has a much longer lever throw due to the way the action works, making it slower and more cumbersome to operate. I don't recall if they mention this in the video or not. You would lose a lot of the advantages of having an action which was designed to handle relatively short cartridges.
Aye, but you have the benefit of faster reloading with the 1895 if you have access to clips, though I think they might have only been available for the Russian manufactured rifles.
 
Aye, but you have the benefit of faster reloading with the 1895 if you have access to clips, though I think they might have only been available for the Russian manufactured rifles.
There's not much point to it, and you would probably be better off with a Lee Enfield. The lever action hardware would be less robust and reliable, as the guts hang out in the open every time you worked the action, and would also be harder to clean and maintain.

There's probably a very good reason why there was very little military interest in Winchester style lever action rifles. The Russians took them in WWI because they were desperate for anything that would go "bang". As a hunting rifle they may be OK, but as a military rifle they were an overly complicated solution to a question that nobody was asking.

Karl likes to go on about lever action rifles, but first he draws a distinction between the earlier pistol calibre toggle lock models, which are the ones he favours, and the later ones meant for larger cartridges.

However, he always evaluates them in a very artificial scenario involving putting as many rounds through some paper targets in as short a period of time as possible over the course of a few seconds in a pre-defined environment. He doesn't look at how they would fit in on a battlefield of that era, instead projecting modern requirements, or at least what he sees requirements as being, onto a very different landscape.
 

HE117

LE
The Seige of Plevna in 1877 where the Turks/Ottomans kept back the Russians by the use of a mix of Peabody/Martini action single shot rifles and Winchester repeaters is often sited as the first use of repeating arms in a major conflict. Contemporary analysis was however that it was the combination of the long range Peabody at a slow rate of fire with the high rate, short range Winchester able to counter the mass attacks by the Russians.

This seems to have set the development of military rifle design down a bit of a rabbit hole, with the introduction of tubular magazine systems such as the Kropatschek, which was copied in the Mauser 71/84, the Gras and the Murata. It was still around in the Lebel! This gave a repeating capability to a full power rifle, but at the expense of a very slow reload time.

It was the introduction of box magazines and packet loading in the Mannlicher that finally solved the rapid, sustained fire issue. This was then copied by the Mauser 98, Lee and Schmidt Rubin designs..

IMHO this always comes back to the big v small calibre argument.. historically up to 1930 Armies have decided that having a long range rifle means you can engage high rates at short range if you want to, but allows attrition at long range! Please always remember that quality of fire rather than quantity is always a better and more sustainable reaction (although not as spectacular or as much fun!)
 
quality of fire rather than quantity is always a better and more sustainable reaction (although not as spectacular or as much fun!)
But - since it is much, much easier to train troops to shoot fast, than it is to to teach them to shoot well, and to ingrain all the requisite ancillary skills* - we brits seem doomed to a cycle of forgetting in peacetime how to do the latter, with those under fire on operations then having to learn the hard way, on the two-way range.
= = = = =
* Locating the enemy; target indication; fire control orders yadda yadda . . . . .
 
Current plan is to take Frankenrifle to Finland for Finnish Brutality 2020, to go Fully Bolt Action.

Question is, what costume? (And just being me counts as a costume in lieu of a better idea...)
Swiss steampunk...
(think Whitby with added cuckoo clocks, lederhosen, dirndls and alphorns...)
 
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