Bloke on the Range videos

ugly

LE
Moderator
How did he get to hunting? Its bloke on the range not the high seat
 
How did he get to hunting? Its bloke on the range not the high seat
To justify why OMG you should never teach right-thumb-in-line cos it's baaaad and will hamper your recoil control (err, wot?) for fast follow-up shots.
 

Tyk

LE
Since you quoted the Manual on how to hold the rifle and Bismarck seemed to do pretty well as a complete novice I'm not sure why he's trying to argue with you.
 
Since you quoted the Manual on how to hold the rifle and Bismarck seemed to do pretty well as a complete novice I'm not sure why he's trying to argue with you.
I think he's just seeking attention...
 
... and of course the thumb piece on the Martini Henry...!
Yup. And the position of thumb selectors/safeties on the tangs of various shotguns and rifles...
 
Here's another attention-seeker...

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I ignored the second one cos why bother? :D
 
Well that made things a little clearer. The bit about the hunting was an irrelevant point he dragged into the discussion in order to try to establish himself as a shooting "expert".

I'm not sure there is any one "true" way in which to hold the rifle with your right hand. A lot of it is going to be about trying to fit different sized and proportioned hands on a "one size fits all" stock in order to get your trigger finger in position. I think that the best that can be done is to show someone several different options and telling him or her to pick the one that feels like it works for him with that rifle.

If the thumb up the back grip does work for that individual with that rifle it does have the advantage of making it less likely for him or her to adopt an unconscious "death grip" on the stock. There are other intermediate positions which can also have that positive effect, but trying to hold the stock in a hammer grip takes conscious effort to avoid gripping it too hard and fatiguing your muscles.

I'm not going to try to tell my grandmother how to suck eggs, but that is my opinion.
 
Well that made things a little clearer. The bit about the hunting was an irrelevant point he dragged into the discussion in order to try to establish himself as a shooting "expert".

I'm not sure there is any one "true" way in which to hold the rifle with your right hand. A lot of it is going to be about trying to fit different sized and proportioned hands on a "one size fits all" stock in order to get your trigger finger in position. I think that the best that can be done is to show someone several different options and telling him or her to pick the one that feels like it works for him with that rifle.

If the thumb up the back grip does work for that individual with that rifle it does have the advantage of making it less likely for him or her to adopt an unconscious "death grip" on the stock. There are other intermediate positions which can also have that positive effect, but trying to hold the stock in a hammer grip takes conscious effort to avoid gripping it too hard and fatiguing your muscles.

I'm not going to try to tell my grandmother how to suck eggs, but that is my opinion.
I'd agree with that entirely. The only thing that matters is that you can (and do) press the trigger straight back and have enough control over the wrist of the stock without death-gripping. Where that hand position is varies according to hand/finger size, stock shape etc.

I'd only take issue with extreme positions: death gripping on the one hand, and having the thumb alongside the stock on the right-hand side on the other hand.
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
Well that made things a little clearer. The bit about the hunting was an irrelevant point he dragged into the discussion in order to try to establish himself as a shooting "expert".

I'm not sure there is any one "true" way in which to hold the rifle with your right hand. A lot of it is going to be about trying to fit different sized and proportioned hands on a "one size fits all" stock in order to get your trigger finger in position. I think that the best that can be done is to show someone several different options and telling him or her to pick the one that feels like it works for him with that rifle.

If the thumb up the back grip does work for that individual with that rifle it does have the advantage of making it less likely for him or her to adopt an unconscious "death grip" on the stock. There are other intermediate positions which can also have that positive effect, but trying to hold the stock in a hammer grip takes conscious effort to avoid gripping it too hard and fatiguing your muscles.

I'm not going to try to tell my grandmother how to suck eggs, but that is my opinion.
Out on our Left Coast BC an annual 1000 yard match is held in the Valley and its a "Come one Come All" even and supply your own rifle and ammo, 5 rounds per entry. Naturally all kinds of aspiring long range shooters show up with all kinds of superbly fashioned rifles and forgot to mention iron sights only, so laser designators, multiplex scopes and doo-dads need not apply. All kinds of experts in how to hold, aim and estimate wind speeds etc were in great number, needless to say it was a young lad with Tikka T3 7mm Rem Mag new ,right out of the box with 162 grain bullets and didn't allow free advice that was being dispensed all about his ears just flopped down, controlled his breathing and smacked the target sufficiently well to walk off with 1st place. The crowd with .358 Belchfire Magnum Dino Destroyers were quite annoyed at the result, but it sure made some of us develop a healthy regard for Tikka.
 
Wot oi did on me olidayz:

 
 
 
We're talking to French-language Swiss TV on Friday for the 19h30 news on YouTube demonetisation, vague community guidelines, arbitrary enforcement etc. We won't let the discussion drift off-topic, and will film it ourselves too :)
 

TamH70

MIA
Nice rifle, but I'm not too sure about the barrel length as 20 inches seems a bit short for 7.62x51mm. I take it that that's the length that the Canadian Rangers requested in their specs for the rifle?
 
Nice rifle, but I'm not too sure about the barrel length as 20 inches seems a bit short for 7.62x51mm. I take it that that's the length that the Canadian Rangers requested in their specs for the rifle?
The LMT sharpshooter rifle has a 16" barrel :)

20's not that short if you want to keep it stiff and still be under the weight of a No.4.
 
For info, the first weekend in October I'll be at Bisley doing the HSR match on Sat pm, and the CSR match on Sunday if anyone else is going...
 
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