Bloke on the Range videos

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Now this is a real head-scratcher of a comment...

1549033665030.png
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I think you've been accused of Generational Appropriation
Yes, how very dare anyone want to study and present the weapons of our forefathers. They're *their* weapons. Not ours... :D
 
Right. That bl**dy Newton-infringing "BREN pulls forwards on firing" thing came up again. Which we can then debunk with some firing footage...

 
Right. That bl**dy Newton-infringing "BREN pulls forwards on firing" thing came up again. Which we can then debunk with some firing footage...

I've read that certain machine guns had a tendency to "walk" forward on their bipods, although I can't recall which ones they were or where I read it. I can't cite examples, so I'm not claiming that as proof of this phenomenon anywhere.

However, what I understood as the explanation was that the feet of the bipod would dig into the soft ground on recoil but not on return, so the bipod would gradually "ratchet" forward. This won't happen on a hard surface as the feet are free to slide both backwards and forwards.

As I said before, I'm not claiming this phenomenon exists for the Bren, but your test wasn't necessarily operating in the conditions in which this supposedly occurred.

There should be some former LMG gunners on this site who could tell us if they ever saw this or not in actual field conditions.
 
Were those standard loads in the BREN firing sequences? Even from the hip it looks very friendly in recoil and control. I understand that as light machine guns went it was well liked and respected, it certainly came to bits and back together very neatly.
I fired a couple of magazines while prone when I was in my teens and it felt pretty friendly, but me being a prop forward built like a brick privvy it had plenty to recoil against.
 
Were those standard loads in the BREN firing sequences? Even from the hip it looks very friendly in recoil and control. I understand that as light machine guns went it was well liked and respected, it certainly came to bits and back together very neatly.
I fired a couple of magazines while prone when I was in my teens and it felt pretty friendly, but me being a prop forward built like a brick privvy it had plenty to recoil against.
They're S&B 180gn cartridges, which are as close to Mk.VII as it's possible to get. It is extremely friendly in recoil, since the whole of the top of the gun can recoil about 1/4" against the buffer spring in the butt group.

Smoothest shooting MG I've yet encountered is the PKM though. That's just magic.
 
They're S&B 180gn cartridges, which are as close to Mk.VII as it's possible to get. It is extremely friendly in recoil, since the whole of the top of the gun can recoil about 1/4" against the buffer spring in the butt group.

Smoothest shooting MG I've yet encountered is the PKM though. That's just magic.
Wait, what? You got a PKM to play with?

This PKM?

PK machine gun - Wikipedia

Insert illustrative of my feelings "Life of Brian" clip here:


Closest thing I ever got to doing that was trundling one round a virtual recreation of the city of Pripyat in "S.T.A.L.K.E.R. - Call of Pripyat".
 
Wait, what? You got a PKM to play with?

This PKM?

PK machine gun - Wikipedia

Insert illustrative of my feelings "Life of Brian" clip here:


Closest thing I ever got to doing that was trundling one round a virtual recreation of the city of Pripyat in "S.T.A.L.K.E.R. - Call of Pripyat".
A couple of friends have them :)
 
They're S&B 180gn cartridges, which are as close to Mk.VII as it's possible to get. It is extremely friendly in recoil, since the whole of the top of the gun can recoil about 1/4" against the buffer spring in the butt group.

Smoothest shooting MG I've yet encountered is the PKM though. That's just magic.
Fair enough, I can really see why it was popular as LMG's go, if you have to lug about a larger weapon it should be a good one.
 
Major thread drift reporting....
I would like to identify a semi auto rifle in a Don McCullin photo from 1964 in the Belgian Congo - Initially thought was a M1 Garand, but the magazine and furniture to the gas plug shot don't match, don't think it is a BM59, furniture and round charging handle. Not one of the MAS - 36/49/56. Maybe MAS-62? it has a SLR reminiscent gas plug and magazine?
Any suggestions/answers?
( re the prisoners, didn't end well for them :( )
mas of some sort.jpg


The Exhibition is at the tate until 6 May Don McCullin – Exhibition at Tate Britain | Tate
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Major thread drift reporting....
I would like to identify a semi auto rifle in a Don McCullin photo from 1964 in the Belgian Congo - Initially thought was a M1 Garand, but the magazine and furniture to the gas plug shot don't match, don't think it is a BM59, furniture and round charging handle. Not one of the MAS - 36/49/56. Maybe MAS-62? it has a SLR reminiscent gas plug and magazine?
Any suggestions/answers
( re the prisoners, didn't end well for them :( )
View attachment 376075
SAFN forerunner to the FAL
 
Got some footage of me shooting one in 7mm Mauser at 300m. A lovely rifle indeed, let down by being 5-round-charger-loaded only.

I need one in my life... But perhaps in a more common calibre such as 7.62x51 (ideally), .30-06 or 8x57.
 
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