Bliar on Iraq, Bank of England, inventing sliced bread....

#1
David Aaronovitch has interviewed Bliar for the BBC. Interviewed is probably the wrong term, he is more likely to have handed him a list of pre-arranged questions to avoid removing his tongue from the former PM's posterior orifice.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/the_blair_years/article2886548.ece

The interview speaks for itself: self justifying nonsense and lies. I do hope his admission on Iraq comes back to haunt him, preferably in the International Criminal Court or by provoking various terrorists into redirecting their efforts away from the innocent travelling public towards a more challenging and fitting target.

His inane utterings demonstrate his unfitness for public office, and any hints of candidature for EU president should be resisted utterly. The man is a deranged egomaniac whose megalomaniac decisions have led directly to the deaths of hundreds of British troops and many thousands of others.

Independence for the Bank of England was my idea, says Tony Blair

Tony Blair claims that he was a driving force behind independence of the Bank of England from the 1980s, challenging the conventional wisdom that the idea was solely Gordon Brown’s.

In an interview with David Aaronovitch, of The Times, for a three-part BBC documentary, the former Prime Minister said that he decided before he reached No 10 to make the change, although he did not claim that he had thought of it before Mr Brown.

In unedited extracts of the BBC interview, which are not being broadcast but have been seen by The Times, Mr Blair said that he “always thought it was the right thing to do”.

The announcement by Mr Brown the Tuesday after Labour won power in 1997 has always been credited to him, and a pamphlet written in 1992 by Ed Balls, soon to become his economic adviser, has been seen as the main inspiration behind the decision.

Blairites have often privately challenged the view that it was a Brown-Balls decision, even though they have accepted that it was Mr Brown as Shadow Chancellor who prepared the ground and who later put the change into effect.

Mr Blair said in the interview: “I remember having discussions with Tory ministers when I was a Shadow Treasury spokesman, saying, ‘You know, the obvious thing is to go for Bank of England independence’.” Mr Blair said that he used to talk to people such as Gavyn Davies, the economist and former chairman of the BBC, about the economics of it. They told him that they thought it was the right decision.

“And so I thought it was the right thing to do. Obviously, Gordon was completely up for that as well so there was no difficulty between us.”

Asked who mentioned it to the other first, Mr Blair replied: “It was part of the discussion very early on that I had with him.”

In the extract of the interview that appears in tomorrow night’s programme, Mr Blair was asked why he and Mr Brown had not consulted the Cabinet. “If Gordon had been against it, that would have been a different matter, but he wasn’t. He was absolutely for it. Myself and the Chancellor were absolutely on all fours together.”

A source close to Mr Brown pointed out that many politicians, including Tory Chancellors, had since revealed that they favoured bank independence when in office, but could not put it into effect. Sources close to Mr Blair and Mr Brown said that the two discussed the issue with aides in 1995. On election day they decided to announce the move within days. The day after the election they met again, with aides and officials. It was decided then not to consult the Cabinet.

Sources close to Mr Blair denied that he was claiming credit for the decision. One said: “They agreed the policy before the election and afterwards and it was for Gordon to announce.”

Tony Blair: ‘I wanted war – it was the right thing to do’

Tony Blair has admitted for the first time that he ignored the pleas of his aides and ministers to deter President Bush from waging war on Iraq because he believed that America was doing the right thing. And he has acknowledged that he turned down a last-ditch offer from Mr Bush to pull Britain out of the conflict.

He has also revealed that he wishes he had published the full reports from the Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) instead of the infamous September dossier about Saddam Hussein’s alleged weapons of mass destruction that so damaged him, and was almost certainly one of the factors that contributed to him leaving office sooner than he wanted.

In frank remarks in a BBC documentary, Mr Blair confirmed openly the belief of many of his closest supporters that he never used his position as America’s strongest ally to try to force Mr Bush down the diplomatic rather than the military route.

It was never a “bargaining chip” for him and he was never looking for a way out, he told David Aaronovitch, of The Times, in interviews for The Blair Years. “It was what I believed in, and I still do believe it,” he said.

The documentary contains clear evidence that many of those around Mr Blair, including Sir David Manning, his foreign policy adviser, Jeremy Greenstock, Britain’s ambassador at the UN, Jack Straw, the Foreign Secretary at the time, and even Colin Powell, the US Secretary of State, had huge reservations about the rush to war.Mr Blair said: “In my view, if it wasn’t clear that the whole nature of the way Saddam was dealing with this issue had changed, I was in favour of military action.”

The programme reveals that the key meeting at which Mr Bush learnt that he had Mr Blair on side took place at Camp David in September 2002 – six months before hostilities began. In return for promising Mr Blair that he would try to help get a second resolution at the UN, he also won Mr Blair’s pledge that if he got “stuck” in the UN, war would be the only way out. Mr Blair later suggested that Mr Bush tried for a second resolution as a “favour” to him.

The programme also reveals that just before the key Commons vote on war Mr Bush telephoned Mr Blair and offered him a way out. Mr Blair explained why he had declined the offer: “He was always very cognisant of the difficulty I had. He was determined we should not end up with the regime change being in Britain and he was saying to me, ‘Look I understand this is very difficult and America can do this militarily on its own and if you want to stick out of it, stick out of it’, and I was equally emphatic we should not do that.”
 
#2
MrPVRd
"David Aaronovitch has interviewed Bliar for the BBC

The interview speaks for itself: self justifying nonsense and lies. His inane utterings demonstrate his unfitness for public office.
The man is a deranged egomaniac whose megalomaniac decisions have led directly to the deaths of hundreds of British troops and many thousands of others."
And Tony Blair wasn't much better either.
 
#3
And the BBC continue to allow him the platform and coverage for him to spew out further sanctimonious crap.
Further evidence of our licence money being squandered.
 
#4
In unedited extracts of the BBC interview, which are not being broadcast but have been seen by The Times...
Erm! Any danger that Neil Morrisey will be doing the voice-overs when the out takes are flogged in one of London's public houses? :)
 
#5
I quote

"Myself and the Chancellor were absolutely on all fours together"

Explains it all
 
#6
Tony Blair: ‘I wanted war – it was the right thing to do’

Tony Blair has admitted for the first time that he ignored the pleas of his aides and ministers to deter President Bush from waging war on Iraq because he believed that America was doing the right thing. And he has acknowledged that he turned down a last-ditch offer from Mr Bush to pull Britain out of the conflict.

He has also revealed that he wishes he had published the full reports from the Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) instead of the infamous September dossier about Saddam Hussein’s alleged weapons of mass destruction that so damaged him, and was almost certainly one of the factors that contributed to him leaving office sooner than he wanted.

In frank remarks in a BBC documentary, Mr Blair confirmed openly the belief of many of his closest supporters that he never used his position as America’s strongest ally to try to force Mr Bush down the diplomatic rather than the military route.

It was never a “bargaining chip” for him and he was never looking for a way out, he told David Aaronovitch, of The Times, in interviews for The Blair Years. “It was what I believed in, and I still do believe it,” he said.
That's good enough evidence for me, give the cnut a trial and hang him.
 
#7
Having Aronovitch interview Blair is like having Lord Haw Haw interview Hitler.
Aronovitch was a leading muscular liberal who idiotically believed that the Iraqi people would benefit from being invaded.
What the fool failed to realise is that the occupation that followed the unprovoked attack would be as violent in its way as the invasion itself.

The fact that quite outrageously the Beeb has got these two treasonous individuals to parlay to camara together is because the Beeb is still paying penance for being right but being found in the wrong by the ludicrous Hutton.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top