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Bliar gives Reid the "kiss of death"

#1
here
The Scotsman said:
The future looks bleak for Reid as he gets the Blair 'kiss of death'
JAMES KIRKUP POLITICAL EDITOR

THERE are few endorsements Cabinet ministers dread more than Tony Blair expressing his "complete confidence" in them, but John Reid yesterday found himself receiving that dubious benediction.

For many politicians facing career-threatening crisis, the Prime Minister's reassurance has been the kiss of death. The super-confident Mr Reid may not be thinking of clearing his Home Office desk just yet, but many believed yesterday that they could hear the last rites being read over the Home Secretary's chances of ever challenging Gordon Brown for the Labour crown.


The Home Secretary has been coming under increasing pressure this week over England's jails, which are full to capacity.

That forced him to ask judges to jail only the most serious offenders. Some responded by letting at least two sex offenders avoid jail.

In the latest such case, Keith Morris, who had four offences involving children, was given bail by Judge Graham Cottle.

Mr Cottle told Exeter court that Morris was only free because of Mr Reid's request. "If this case had been here last week it would have been over by now and he would be in Exeter prison," the judge said.

Morris's release follows a case on Thursday when a judge in Wales imposed a non-custodial sentence on Derek Williams, who pleaded guilty to downloading child pornography from the internet.

Williams himself inflamed anger over his release by telling the media "I've been punished enough" and blaming Mr Reid for his sudden national notoriety. "If John Reid hadn't sent this letter out none of this would have happened. None of this is anything to do with us, it's all about politics," he said from his home in North Wales.

Mr Reid last night said he had no regrets and suggested judges had misconstrued his advice.

But David Cameron, the Conservative leader, yesterday described the Williams case as "disgraceful" and blamed the Home Secretary. The opposition has stopped short of a resignation call but Tories can scent blood.

Because even though the prisons crisis would be bad enough in isolation, it was not the only blow Mr Reid suffered yesterday. Professor Sir Rod Morgan, chairman of the Youth Justice Board in England, resigned his post yesterday with a blistering attack on Labour's "prisons crisis".

And in a High Court case in London, government lawyers were forced to admit that Mr Reid had acted "unlawfully" in relation to the detention of young asylum-seekers.

All told, it was enough for Mr Blair's spokesman to be forced into a bleak ritual exchange at his regular meeting with Westminister journalists. Does Mr Blair have complete confidence in his Home Secretary? "Yes," the spokesman replied wearily.

The very fact that the question was being asked is a sign of Mr Reid's plight: every minister forced from office under Mr Blair was given his public backing in the weeks before their demise. According to one Whitehall calculation, ministers survive an average of three weeks after No 10's confidence vote.

Talk of a possible departure from office is a far cry from the Westminster gossip of only a few weeks ago, when Mr Reid's prime ministerial potential was the subject of choice.

Mr Reid happily stoked the speculation, using a powerful speech to the Labour Party conference in September to stress his credentials for the top job, using the word "leadership" half a dozen times and quoting John F Kennedy. And earlier this month, he irritated Mr Brown by outlining his "vision" for the Labour party's future.

Strong performances on international terrorism, combined with the suspicion that Mr Blair is secretly hoping for a challenger to the Chancellor, saw punters betting on Mr Reid to pip Mr Brown at the post. But the corrosive effect of those Home Office scandals has eaten into his steely image, and Ladbrokes yesterday lengthened the odds on him from 7-1 to 9-1.

FINGER PRINT PLAN FOR IMMIGRANTS

FOREIGNERS living in Britain will have to register with the government and be fingerprinted, or face fines and expulsion, the Home Office said yesterday.

As part of a new bill aimed at tightening control of Britain's borders, immigration officials will also be put in uniform.

The bill includes measures to accelerate the expulsion of foreign criminals from Britain. But critics seized on a clause that would give such criminals the right of appeal, something that could theoretically delay expulsion attempts still further

The fingerprinting plan is part of the proposed national ID card scheme, which ministers have said would be applied to foreign nationals before UK citizens.

The Home Office said the new laws would cut illegal immigration and make Britain safer.

But Conservatives claim the bill, the government's sixth in ten years, shows ministers had run out of ideas: "There is no reason to believe that John Reid's tough rhetoric will translate into effective action this time," said a source.

And Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman, criticised the government's "continuing desire to create new legislation"

He said: "Questions remain as to why existing powers - notably against unscrupulous employers of illegal workers - are so poorly enforced."
 
#2
Not sure that I agree with Reids letter but what I don't get is how 2 judges both decided that serial child sex offendes were not serious offences.

that forced him to ask judges to jail only the most serious offenders. Some responded by letting at least two sex offenders avoid jail.
I think this may have more to do with judges wanting to highlight a, the problem with jails b, Reid getting involved in their business. The only way they could get that into the public eye is by going against the wording of the letter and letting serious offenders free.
 
#3
One wonders if that 'vote of confidence' actually was instigated from the present Fuhrers staff, or,
more likely Broon's staff thought they'd get a pre-emptive strike in against Reid , as he is just about the only other senior cabinet member with a possible chance of contesting the leadership election , whenever it may be.
Nothing like a little preparation in advance , bit of psyops for the party faithful if prep be needed.
foil hat well on and tied down :)
 
#4
jest265 said:
......... what I don't get is how 2 judges both decided that serial child sex offendes were not serious offences.
This is due to the way Judges regard sentencing as their own private playground. They regard maintaining seperation from the politicians as a very serious thing and have always resisted anything that TELLS them what punishment must be awarded. May be heightened at the moment due to the way in which the senior law men in Govt are associated with B.Liar
 
#5
yes, the inevitable pre-emptive strike against Reid from the Broon Camp - all's fair in love and new labour!
 
#6
PM:
If someone is a danger to the public the place for them is behind bars
Link

No shit Sherlock! Is that's the way it's supposed to work then?! Pity it seems that there seems to be more news about victims having to stand up for themselves and then having to appear before the courts, old pensioners not affording council tax payments, miscarriages of justice, those whose crimes require longer sentences but receiving suspended sentences/fines/pointless asbos, those being released early to reoffend under the guise of the probation service, I think I'll stop there as I could go on.
To be fair, a lot of the crud occured before he stepped into the role which leaves Blinkett and Clarke positively smug with the public gung-ho-ing for Reid's resignation.
Take away the luxuries and fill them cells til they reach standing room only, not only do you save money but you put the shit up people to avoid going there in the first place. Problem solved!
 
#7
Bet Reid could give Tone Dear Tone, the Kiss of Death if he chose to tell all.
john
But Turkeys don't vote early for Christmas, do they ?
 
#8
Is Reid the guy who famously said "I will fvcking well work all night" or something similar, he seems like he actually wants to do good, I prefer Reid Labour over sh!tstains Brown liebour.

The problem with the jails just means they will have to build another jail or two but until then we will see paedophiles go free and un-PC civvies get locked for life. My bet is that if Blair was Home Secretary, he would ship us all to guantanamo.
 
#9
Love him or loathe him. John Reid does seem to be one of the more managerially competent members of the cabinet. If he went, who could replace him and do a better job? Margaret Beckett the ex welder? John Prescott the ex steward?

I don't think there is a single member of the cabinet with any experience of managing large organisations. We are stuffed. Every government department from the Home Office to the NHS to the Child Support Agency is in meltdown.

Just read today's Home Office news on the BBC. Apparently 322 convicted sex offenders who are required to register with the police have been 'lost'. Perhaps they've buggered off abroad with the drug dealers who were supposed to have their passports seized but didn't. Alternatively, perhaps they're lodging with the foreign convicts who should have been deported but weren't.

How much more of this crap do we have to endure before there is a confidence vote in parliament?
 
#10
Ancient_Mariner said:
Love him or loathe him. John Reid does seem to be one of the more managerially competent members of the cabinet. If he went, who could replace him and do a better job? Margaret Beckett the ex welder? John Prescott the ex steward?

I don't think there is a single member of the cabinet with any experience of managing large organisations. We are stuffed. Every government department from the Home Office to the NHS to the Child Support Agency is in meltdown.

Just read today's Home Office news on the BBC. Apparently 322 convicted sex offenders who are required to register with the police have been 'lost'. Perhaps they've buggered off abroad with the drug dealers who were supposed to have their passports seized but didn't. Alternatively, perhaps they're lodging with the foreign convicts who should have been deported but weren't.

How much more of this crap do we have to endure before there is a confidence vote in parliament?
Since when did ministers manage any department? They are in charge of the direction they want the department goes in and give their orders to the hordes of minions in civil service uniform to carry out the detail. Lower level ministers give out lower level orders. Take the decision to stop Paras jumping (if indeed it is true?), You don't get ministers writing the letters to the RAF telling them their services are no longer required, or the CO i/c jumps telling him of the decision.
 
#11
Sven said:
They are in charge of the direction they want the department goes in and give their orders to the hordes of minions in civil service uniform to carry out the detail.
That sounds to me like a pretty accurate description of a senior manager.
 
#12
Once upon a time it was the Northern Ireland Office that was considered to be the 'poisoned chalice'... Now it appears to be the Home Office! :twisted:
 
#13
FlakeShag said:
Is Reid the guy who famously said "I will fvcking well work all night" or something similar, he seems like he actually wants to do good, I prefer Reid Labour over sh!tstains Brown liebour.
He said "I'll f***ing well work 18 hours a day to sort this out."

He went on holiday to France a week after saying it though.

Reid takes a holiday as Home Office flounders
 

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