Bladeless Multitool

I had a very good flick knife as part of my EOD toolkit. It was very useful on the odd occasion, but of course, now flick knives are prohibited so I use a ceramic blade knife instead. Its not as easily accessible in a hurry and not as handy when you dont have enough hands but it is lethally sharp. te best bet for a bladeless multitool is prolly the leatherman.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
So a possibly illegal act in order to cover their arses. I reckon a good lawyer in a non weighted justice system will tear them a new one very easily.
They don't see it as illegal or a risk to them. CPS may not bring charges but they can justify the initial arrest. With the media frenzy over knife crime, political point scoring and policy/direction from management they have every right to err on the side of caution.
 
Thanks.
Taking a hacksaw/grind stone to the knife on a normal tool was an option I was considering. But I was trying to find an alternative before I went that route.



Sorry Dingerr, the links are not working to Amazon for me for some reason. Would it be this thing? If so I had seen it, and was considering it. Although it looked quite a large tool.
There's a handy cms ruler on the handle to give it a sense of scale.
I have a similar Gerber but with blade and its quite a compact size overall, especially as the head retracts in.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
I read somewhere (and lost the reference) of ‘grown ups’ getting snotty about blades that can be opened with one hand. it isn’t in the rules, but practically speaking, most single handlers can be opened as quickly as a Bali-Song.
I know a police control room operator. He has firm views on the carrying of knives.

Every day I carry a Spyderco knife based on the svord peasant design. Similar to the one in the link below, give or take £120!
[/URL]

It is totally UK legal. As per section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 it is a folder with a blade of less than 3". It is also not a lock knife, as per Harris vs DPP, 1992. I can legally carry it in any public place without good reason.

When his arguments against me carrying the knife were shot down he asked if it could be opened one handed. It can, quite easily. He then claimed it was illegal for that reason.

I called him on this, as the only one handed opening knives prohibited by law are balisongs, gravity knives and flick knives. This is covered in the 1956 Offensive Weapons Act. When challenged to state the legislation making my knife illegal he went dumb, with no counter argument or defense.

He was parroting police policy and opinion, not the law.
 
So a possibly illegal act in order to cover their arses. I reckon a good lawyer in a non weighted justice system will tear them a new one very easily.
Not at all. The officer just has to have a held belief beyond all reasonable doubt. If the officer sees someone walk into a McDonalds with a knife that the carrier had no lawful reason to do so (ergo your carpet fitter who forgot he was carrying a carpet knife whilst on his lunch break and not fitting a carpet in McDonalds), then the Officer may facilitate arrest.
Most will just advise, but if it’s a Ned with a Stanley knife in his grey trackie bottoms who doesn’t have a job, he’s getting lifted.
Salient point here is, use your common sense, don’t draw attention to yourself and you’ll be fine
 
It is a perfectly acceptable defence in law to possess any knife if you can demonstrate a lawful reason for that possession. If you use a knife as part of your work, and you are at work then this is perfectly legal. Having a knife with a blade longer than 3" in a public place where there is no demonstrable need for it is a problem, and can get you into an argument with the law (which you would be unlikely to win!). Wandering about the high street at 2am on a Saturday morning with a couple of Katanas stuffed down the back of your fleece would require a very good story!

Blades or pointy implements such as knitting needles will keep you out of certain restricted areas such as airports courthouses and parliament buildings, however these are local restrictions and do not fall within the provisions of the law.

There is widespread misinterpretation of this law by the Police and the Courts. Do not encourage them. You have every right to carry a pocket knife with an unlocked blade under 3" in a public place without being challenged. There was never an intention in the law to restrict locked blade pocket knives, but a crusading judge decided that this would happen, and nothing has been done to challenge it (yet..!)

I get sick of hearing about "Knife Crime".. there is no "Poker Crime" or "Half Brick Crime" or "Big Bit of Wood Crime"... just "Crime", and I wish the Press, Plod and the Courts would concentrate on that bit rather than the implement used! Possession of an implement with intent to use it as a weapon is certainly a valid concern, but it is the issue of "intent" that needs to be proved to show a crime is committed, not just "Possession" which IMHO is lazy and dangerous lawmaking..

There is no logic in arguing that legally restricting possession of artefacts is the solution to issues of violence. The problem is the perpetrator, not the implement! Whilst there is perfect sense in controlling access to certain significantly dangerous artefacts such as guns and poisons, this should never be considered the main and only reaction. Society needs to be able to identify, challenge and control people who demonstrate that they are unable to control themselves. If the agents of society such as the Police and the Courts are not doing this, then it is this that needs to be addressed, We must not simply allow these failed agencies to foist even more restrictions on society!

The law is the servant of society, not the other way around! I want to see a free society, but this should not mean that individuals should be able to absent themselves from that society, and that society has to be controlled at the level of the weakest member. That is the politics of the nursery school, and we need to fight it with all our might!
Agreed but as a chap, who likes a few things just in case .

As you can see on my key fob, torch, can opener, fire starter, USB and Gerber mini tool. No problem flying on Kenya air, TAP Portugal, Lufthansa.

7C6EAC85-73B2-4A06-B7D4-DBF6C1EE201B.jpeg


Before I had the gerber I had a letherman micra.

895ACB63-E05F-4FFE-8356-F5A837004492.jpeg


I did grind off the “blade” like 1/2 inch or less.

BA nazi checkers . Please wait sir.

Oh you have a tool ? We cannot let you get on the aircraft .
Me What , I even ground off the tiny knife blade .
“Rules are rules”.

and cnuts are cnuts.
 
I`m too old for this shit, as a nipper I was expected to carry something to sharpen a pencil and know how to use it, when did one of the oldest tools known to man suddenly become such a danger to public health?
And your metal work teacher made sure you knew how to keep it sharp because a sharp knife is safer than a blunt one.
And the answer too your question is when politicians decided stupid laws made up for expensive coppers and common sense.
 
I know a police control room operator. He has firm views on the carrying of knives.

Every day I carry a Spyderco knife based on the svord peasant design. Similar to the one in the link below, give or take £120!
[/URL]

It is totally UK legal. As per section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 it is a folder with a blade of less than 3". It is also not a lock knife, as per Harris vs DPP, 1992. I can legally carry it in any public place without good reason.

When his arguments against me carrying the knife were shot down he asked if it could be opened one handed. It can, quite easily. He then claimed it was illegal for that reason.

I called him on this, as the only one handed opening knives prohibited by law are balisongs, gravity knives and flick knives. This is covered in the 1956 Offensive Weapons Act. When challenged to state the legislation making my knife illegal he went dumb, with no counter argument or defense.

He was parroting police policy and opinion, not the law.
I agree that the letter of the law is pretty clear and single handed openers are legal, but I would rather not lose a day of my life proving the point... My FIL discovered this when his wife’s care assistant spotted an air pistol in the back of a cupboard and call 999 (he has a FAC and several rifles and shotguns securely and legally held), next thing he’s in cuffs in the back of a police car, his matched pairs of guns thrown in the boot and off for a night in the cells 30 miles away. Meanwhile bedridden wife is left at home alone. He eventually got his guns back and an apology from the Chief Constable, but several people’s days were ruined...
 
They don't see it as illegal or a risk to them. CPS may not bring charges but they can justify the initial arrest. With the media frenzy over knife crime, political point scoring and policy/direction from management they have every right to err on the side of caution.
Not at all. The officer just has to have a held belief beyond all reasonable doubt. If the officer sees someone walk into a McDonalds with a knife that the carrier had no lawful reason to do so (ergo your carpet fitter who forgot he was carrying a carpet knife whilst on his lunch break and not fitting a carpet in McDonalds), then the Officer may facilitate arrest.
Most will just advise, but if it’s a Ned with a Stanley knife in his grey trackie bottoms who doesn’t have a job, he’s getting lifted.
Salient point here is, use your common sense, don’t draw attention to yourself and you’ll be fine
My point is confiscation of a legally held item without a receipt.

A.N. Other's post #64 and Nimbus' post above refers re the level of allowed stupidity in those supposedly knowledgeable of their occupation.
 
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A.N.Other

Old-Salt
I'd agree with that. Never hand over an item without a receipt. My every day carry knife cost £130. My bushcraft knives cost around £300.

If I'm "persuaded" to hand them over to avoid arrest I'll ask for a receipt. No way will they be "lost" on the way to the disposal bin. (may sound far fetched but I have heard officers discussing this)

Edit for spelling
 

TheAssassin

War Hero
Although aimed at fishermen, has no knife/blade


 
Indeed!

In fact when the law became all twitchy about the subject the UK knife collecting community spoke pleadingly with Sal Glesser who owns Spyderco. Sal is actually a good bloke and stays in contact and visits his loyal community as often as he can.

For the UK he came up with a solution to get around the lock knife and blade length problems. He had his people design a knife that, unlike most of their other knives, does not have a locking mechanism, rather a stiff slip type mechanism. And, the blade is just a gnats cock under 3 inches long too. Tadaaa! Problem solved.

The knife is called the UK Pen Knife, or UKPK.


My own solution to the bladed multitool problem would be to swap out the knife blade for another tool, or have it re-ground at one or two inches long. If you need one ordering in the US feel free to give me a shout - compare UK and US prices.
A viable cheaper alternative is spyderco Byrd tern.
Locking system is the same as above and it's UK legal. I have one and the slip joint is quite stiff and has a halfway point so you don't close it on your fingers. Good steel, highly reccomended.
 
I know a police control room operator. He has firm views on the carrying of knives.

Every day I carry a Spyderco knife based on the svord peasant design. Similar to the one in the link below, give or take £120!
[/URL]

It is totally UK legal. As per section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 it is a folder with a blade of less than 3". It is also not a lock knife, as per Harris vs DPP, 1992. I can legally carry it in any public place without good reason.

When his arguments against me carrying the knife were shot down he asked if it could be opened one handed. It can, quite easily. He then claimed it was illegal for that reason.

I called him on this, as the only one handed opening knives prohibited by law are balisongs, gravity knives and flick knives. This is covered in the 1956 Offensive Weapons Act. When challenged to state the legislation making my knife illegal he went dumb, with no counter argument or defense.

He was parroting police policy and opinion, not the law.
Svors peasant has become my go to knife now, i have several in various bags, pockets & glove boxes - be careful on the length of the cutting edge though, some are just over 3” (which I solved with a quick bit of filing on the back edge)
 
I know a police control room operator. He has firm views on the carrying of knives.

Every day I carry a Spyderco knife based on the svord peasant design. Similar to the one in the link below, give or take £120!
[/URL]

It is totally UK legal. As per section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 it is a folder with a blade of less than 3". It is also not a lock knife, as per Harris vs DPP, 1992. I can legally carry it in any public place without good reason.

When his arguments against me carrying the knife were shot down he asked if it could be opened one handed. It can, quite easily. He then claimed it was illegal for that reason.

I called him on this, as the only one handed opening knives prohibited by law are balisongs, gravity knives and flick knives. This is covered in the 1956 Offensive Weapons Act. When challenged to state the legislation making my knife illegal he went dumb, with no counter argument or defense.

He was parroting police policy and opinion, not the law.
Exacto mundo, FFS a police control room phone person giving opinion on the law. I went through police training to just about skim the law and got more depth with experience over a few years. The standard SOP used to be if you thought someone had done something, or was doing something, worthy of being nicked then you would arrest them. Then you would take them back to the station where, depending who the charge room Sgt was, you would probably in the first instance check in your copy of Moriartys Police Law to see if there was a case to answer. If you were not sure you would speak to the charge room Sgt who, either knew, or would check his copy of Moriartys and possibly the Stones Justice manual if one was in the Duty Inspectors office, or the Chief Inspectors office.

To be honest if you are wheeled in for carrying a knife because the PC is not sure you should be in and out with an apology in under an hour along with the offer of a lift home as mild compensation for him being a twonk and wasting your time. IMHO wasting my time as a civvy is just as bad as wasting my time when I was a copper. For matters that are high profile it is amazing how little training and knowledge there is and they end up muddling through and alienating the public with their mild threats and heavy handedness - get on the phone, speak to your shift Sgt, or Inspector for advice, there is no shame in asking questions.
 
I've got an original Leatherman ( if it dies than I may look at another ) anyhow, I once offered it to a cop to aid him in assisting access to a neighbours property.
It was a screwdriver or he'd have to make Mrs Philbins door go away.
Needs must, eh. ;)

Edit: She'd had a fall, nothing too bad.
 
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Arkanstigger

War Hero
A viable cheaper alternative is spyderco Byrd tern.
Locking system is the same as above and it's UK legal. I have one and the slip joint is quite stiff and has a halfway point so you don't close it on your fingers. Good steel, highly reccomended.
IMHO the Byrd* Tern is better than the Spyderco original. As you say the slip joint is much more positive, the back spring runs the full length of the handle and this gives it a bit more weight which makes it 'feel' much better to use. I also think the blade is better when it comes to sharpening.

*Byrd is the Chinese manufacturer of a Spyderco design, hence the price.
 

Verwaltung

Clanker
What is the actual problem with locking knives in the UK these days? They have to be like this otherwise they can fold up on your fingers (and even if you think they can't, they can - I had a lucky escape once). I'm sure I've bought Opinel knives in the UK (I used to live there) and they definitely lock open with a rotating collar.
 

Unremarkable

War Hero
What is the actual problem with locking knives in the UK these days? They have to be like this otherwise they can fold up on your fingers (and even if you think they can't, they can - I had a lucky escape once). I'm sure I've bought Opinel knives in the UK (I used to live there) and they definitely lock open with a rotating collar.
My Leatherman had a distressing tendency to do that.
 

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