Bladeless Multitool

I used to have a Gerber multitool and gerber knife on my belt, I only ever wore the belt or used the tools when I was in uniform.


I was on task once and a young cop commented on holding an illegal blade (I don’t even think the blade was above 3”), I thought he was joking, but the No2 later told me he kept bleating on about it when I was up the road.

He“d probably have had a heart attack if he knew what was in the bomb van.
Did no one tell him "He's on our side, and he's got legit reasons - now STFU" ?
 

HE117

LE
Did no one tell him "He's on our side, and he's got legit reasons - now STFU" ?
I think a stiff ignoring is the usual approach...

From my experience, the reaction to EOD by the Police is a bit schizophrenic.. often based on their perception of the nature of the device in question. They either are extremely cooperative and friendly or seem to feel the need to indulge in a d1ck swinging contest. I find the former to be the case when the device looks like it might be live and a degree of risk is involved...

In the old days, senior and older folk seemed to be more reasonable, although they did get a bit upset with me for closing the M1 in Belfast in the middle of the rush hour..!

Cynical, moi...?
 

neil82

Old-Salt
I`m too old for this shit, as a nipper I was expected to carry something to sharpen a pencil and know how to use it, when did one of the oldest tools known to man suddenly become such a danger to public health?
 
I`m too old for this shit, as a nipper I was expected to carry something to sharpen a pencil and know how to use it, when did one of the oldest tools known to man suddenly become such a danger to public health?
Just carry a pencil, then you have good reason to carry a ‘pen knife’, though with a nice sharp 4H pencil, you have no need for the Sykes-Fairbairn...
 
It is a perfectly acceptable defence in law to possess any knife if you can demonstrate a lawful reason for that possession. If you use a knife as part of your work, and you are at work then this is perfectly legal. Having a knife with a blade longer than 3" in a public place where there is no demonstrable need for it is a problem, and can get you into an argument with the law (which you would be unlikely to win!). Wandering about the high street at 2am on a Saturday morning with a couple of Katanas stuffed down the back of your fleece would require a very good story!

Blades or pointy implements such as knitting needles will keep you out of certain restricted areas such as airports courthouses and parliament buildings, however these are local restrictions and do not fall within the provisions of the law.

There is widespread misinterpretation of this law by the Police and the Courts. Do not encourage them. You have every right to carry a pocket knife with an unlocked blade under 3" in a public place without being challenged. There was never an intention in the law to restrict locked blade pocket knives, but a crusading judge decided that this would happen, and nothing has been done to challenge it (yet..!)

I get sick of hearing about "Knife Crime".. there is no "Poker Crime" or "Half Brick Crime" or "Big Bit of Wood Crime"... just "Crime", and I wish the Press, Plod and the Courts would concentrate on that bit rather than the implement used! Possession of an implement with intent to use it as a weapon is certainly a valid concern, but it is the issue of "intent" that needs to be proved to show a crime is committed, not just "Possession" which IMHO is lazy and dangerous lawmaking..

There is no logic in arguing that legally restricting possession of artefacts is the solution to issues of violence. The problem is the perpetrator, not the implement! Whilst there is perfect sense in controlling access to certain significantly dangerous artefacts such as guns and poisons, this should never be considered the main and only reaction. Society needs to be able to identify, challenge and control people who demonstrate that they are unable to control themselves. If the agents of society such as the Police and the Courts are not doing this, then it is this that needs to be addressed, We must not simply allow these failed agencies to foist even more restrictions on society!

The law is the servant of society, not the other way around! I want to see a free society, but this should not mean that individuals should be able to absent themselves from that society, and that society has to be controlled at the level of the weakest member. That is the politics of the nursery school, and we need to fight it with all our might!
Indeed!

In fact when the law became all twitchy about the subject the UK knife collecting community spoke pleadingly with Sal Glesser who owns Spyderco. Sal is actually a good bloke and stays in contact and visits his loyal community as often as he can.

For the UK he came up with a solution to get around the lock knife and blade length problems. He had his people design a knife that, unlike most of their other knives, does not have a locking mechanism, rather a stiff slip type mechanism. And, the blade is just a gnats cock under 3 inches long too. Tadaaa! Problem solved.

The knife is called the UK Pen Knife, or UKPK.


My own solution to the bladed multitool problem would be to swap out the knife blade for another tool, or have it re-ground at one or two inches long. If you need one ordering in the US feel free to give me a shout - compare UK and US prices.
 
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Just carry a pencil, then you have good reason to carry a ‘pen knife’, though with a nice sharp 4H pencil, you have no need for the Sykes-Fairbairn...
Yes, you can definitely make your point with a pencil.

 

Fishbulb

Old-Salt
Indeed!

In fact when the law became all twitchy about the subject the UK knife collecting community spoke pleadingly with Sal Glesser who owns Spyderco. Sal is actually a good bloke and stays in contact and visits his loyal community as often as he can.

For the UK he came up with a solution to get around the lock knife and blade length problems. He had his people design a knife that, unlike most of their other knives, does not have a locking mechanism, rather a stiff slip type mechanism. And, the blade is just a gnats cock under 3 inches long too. Tadaaa! Problem solved.

The knife is called the UK Pen Knife, or UKPK.


My own solution to the bladed multitool problem would be to swap out the knife blade for another tool, or have it re-ground at one or two inches long. If you need one ordering in the US feel free to give me a shout - compare UK and US prices.
I've got the Lansky solution to the same challenge. Allegedly World legal because of the short blade and non-locking (but heavy) slipjoint

everyday-carry-lansky-world-legal-review-uk-friendly-edc-pocket-knife.jpg


 
I've got the Lansky solution to the same challenge. Allegedly World legal because of the short blade and non-locking (but heavy) slipjoint

View attachment 450369

Thats nice, I did not know they made that. The other option from Spyderco used to be the Denmark Pen Knife, or DKPK, which they stopped making.

There was a tale on British Blades Forum of a mature chap in Nottingham who was lifted, by an over enthusiastic young constable, whilst carrying a UKPK - as people do with the clip showing out of their pocket. After sending a few hours in an interview room and a cell he was released with a huge apology.
 

Fishbulb

Old-Salt
Thats nice, I did not know they made that. The other option from Spyderco used to be the Denmark Pen Knife, or DKPK, which they stopped making.

There was a tale on British Blades Forum of a mature chap in Nottingham who was lifted, by an over enthusiastic young constable, whilst carrying a UKPK - as people do with the clip showing out of their pocket. After sending a few hours in an interview room and a cell he was released with a huge apology.
It's pleasantly chunky for a "penknife". A real pity it doesn't lock.

I had a similar run-in with the boys in blue black over a small fully legal folder. When open it would fit within the diagonal of my palm, and the blade profile was similar to a dinghy knife - you certainly couldn't stab anything with it
 
I've got the Lansky solution to the same challenge. Allegedly World legal because of the short blade and non-locking (but heavy) slipjoint

View attachment 450369

Beaten to it. I was just going to post that. Quite cheap too, coming in around US$19.

Not a bad little biltong knife at all, although you still have to watch your fingers. The slipjoint may be quite stiff, but it'll still get you if you're not paying attention on a particularly thick chunk of meat.
 

Fishbulb

Old-Salt
Quite cheap too, coming in around US$19.
That was another factor in my choice! If some overenthusiastic cop decides to "confiscate" it before sending me on my way, I'm not going to bother arguing and possibly escalating the situation
 
Does confiscation entail being given a receipt?

If not, what is the legality of someone making off with your property? If you can later prove it's a legal item and was taken from you without an official receipt issued, would that be a case for a charge of theft/robbery?
 
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A.N.Other

Old-Salt
A big problem is not the legality of the knife but the perception and officer's fear of getting in to trouble.

"let the CPS sort it out"
South Wales Police officer when having a chat at a MR callout

As in the example above, they will arrest just in case or just to send a message and dissuade others from carrying knives. If you're not familiar with the law, prepared to put up a reasonable defence or get legal advice you may accept the caution. Result for the police as another "weapon" is off the streets, their stats look good and an easy day's work.
 

Ned_Seagoon

War Hero
I have carried a Gerber Billfold knife in my grab bag for years and, because of its construction, I have never been pulled for it at security. The blade is about 3cm long, the body 4cm. It has a clip on one side and must be squeezed to either unfold or refold the blade. Not a problem here in France, the land of Opinel ring-lock knives. However.....Question: Would the UK Authorities (Plod or UKBF) consider my Gerber to be a lock knife?
 

TamH70

MIA
It is a perfectly acceptable defence in law to possess any knife if you can demonstrate a lawful reason for that possession. If you use a knife as part of your work, and you are at work then this is perfectly legal. Having a knife with a blade longer than 3" in a public place where there is no demonstrable need for it is a problem, and can get you into an argument with the law (which you would be unlikely to win!). Wandering about the high street at 2am on a Saturday morning with a couple of Katanas stuffed down the back of your fleece would require a very good story!

Blades or pointy implements such as knitting needles will keep you out of certain restricted areas such as airports courthouses and parliament buildings, however these are local restrictions and do not fall within the provisions of the law.

There is widespread misinterpretation of this law by the Police and the Courts. Do not encourage them. You have every right to carry a pocket knife with an unlocked blade under 3" in a public place without being challenged. There was never an intention in the law to restrict locked blade pocket knives, but a crusading judge decided that this would happen, and nothing has been done to challenge it (yet..!)

I get sick of hearing about "Knife Crime".. there is no "Poker Crime" or "Half Brick Crime" or "Big Bit of Wood Crime"... just "Crime", and I wish the Press, Plod and the Courts would concentrate on that bit rather than the implement used! Possession of an implement with intent to use it as a weapon is certainly a valid concern, but it is the issue of "intent" that needs to be proved to show a crime is committed, not just "Possession" which IMHO is lazy and dangerous lawmaking..

There is no logic in arguing that legally restricting possession of artefacts is the solution to issues of violence. The problem is the perpetrator, not the implement! Whilst there is perfect sense in controlling access to certain significantly dangerous artefacts such as guns and poisons, this should never be considered the main and only reaction. Society needs to be able to identify, challenge and control people who demonstrate that they are unable to control themselves. If the agents of society such as the Police and the Courts are not doing this, then it is this that needs to be addressed, We must not simply allow these failed agencies to foist even more restrictions on society!

The law is the servant of society, not the other way around! I want to see a free society, but this should not mean that individuals should be able to absent themselves from that society, and that society has to be controlled at the level of the weakest member. That is the politics of the nursery school, and we need to fight it with all our might!
I better not get stopped by the fuzz on the way to and from my college course today, as I'll be carrying several pairs of scissors, a Gerber multi-tool and a Victorinox swiss army knife.

Mainly because telling them that I'm doing a crafting/sewing/general making stuff course would be highly embarrassing.
 
I have carried a Gerber Billfold knife in my grab bag for years and, because of its construction, I have never been pulled for it at security. The blade is about 3cm long, the body 4cm. It has a clip on one side and must be squeezed to either unfold or refold the blade. Not a problem here in France, the land of Opinel ring-lock knives. However.....Question: Would the UK Authorities (Plod or UKBF) consider my Gerber to be a lock knife?
Depends who your Officer is. 99% will allow it as it’s a tool. I carry my own through Airport security, some over enthusiastic airport security people will take it off you though. I always let the truckers keep their kitchen knives in their cabs because they’re used for prepping their food, and therefore a legal reason to be in possession. I have confiscated a length legal folder though, because it was a locking blade. I was going to let it go but my boss told me to seize it. So, it depends on the Officer, and their common sense
 
Manchester airport, I’m going to Utah, canoe tripping. All of our kit is in 25l blue plastic barrels (hard to get in the US, so we exchange them for MEC holdalls at the end of the trip) which also make handy seats in the interminable queues.
Now we get series of polyester uniforms asking what is in the barrels...
“luggage”
“What might that be?”
”you know, socks, t-shirts, fleecy jackets”
”anything that could be used as a weapon.”
”just the 3 knives, 4 multitools, a golock and an axe”
At this point we are moved to the big x-ray machine with the much shorter queue, which was a bonus.
<on thread>
I read somewhere (and lost the reference) of ‘grown ups’ getting snotty about blades that can be opened with one hand. it isn’t in the rules, but practically speaking, most single handlers can be opened as quickly as a Bali-Song.
 
A big problem is not the legality of the knife but the perception and officer's fear of getting in to trouble.

"let the CPS sort it out"
South Wales Police officer when having a chat at a MR callout

As in the example above, they will arrest just in case or just to send a message and dissuade others from carrying knives. If you're not familiar with the law, prepared to put up a reasonable defence or get legal advice you may accept the caution. Result for the police as another "weapon" is off the streets, their stats look good and an easy day's work.
So a possibly illegal act in order to cover their arses. I reckon a good lawyer in a non weighted justice system will tear them a new one very easily.
 
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