Bladeless Multitool

Will that not wreck the thing, or is it simple to do?
Take photos as you dismantle it, then you’ll know where the spacers came from. Browse Leatherman spares for a tool to replace the blade, the holder for the file will take a regular jigsaw blade on some models. No one is going to notice if you have a ground down and sharpened spare in the back of the pouch In case you ever need an actual blade.
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Like this one. You’ll need threadlock when you re assemble it..
 
Sorry mate.. I was having a bit of an unload on this one, but I am of the belief that the problem has originated within the police and spread.. I am sure this management decision has been influenced either directly or indirectly by the Police. This is not something that should be happening!

We have the same problem with cameras in mobile phones being banned in schools..!
I used to have a Gerber multitool and gerber knife on my belt, I only ever wore the belt or used the tools when I was in uniform.


I was on task once and a young cop commented on holding an illegal blade (I don’t even think the blade was above 3”), I thought he was joking, but the No2 later told me he kept bleating on about it when I was up the road.

He“d probably have had a heart attack if he knew what was in the bomb van.
 
Will that not wreck the thing, or is it simple to do?
My Leatherman Wave is held together with 4 hex bolts. The trickiest part is getting hold of the appropriate bit to undo the blasted things as they aren't a standard hex fitting but have a raised centre so need a 'hollow' bit. Once you can undo the little bastards the rest is easy.

We have the same problem with cameras in mobile phones being banned in schools..!
Off topic but that's not a problem, it's an excellent idea.
 
You can be arrested for carrying a Stanley knife in a public place, if you don’t have a lawful reason to do so. Carrying any bladed instrument in public for a job is okay, forgetting it’s on your belt and walking into a restaurant/bar/shop et al, will get you arrested. Forgetting is not lawful defence
 

DAS

War Hero
I tend to use a swiss army "cyber tool". Standard small and large blade but legal in UK. Handy for computer work.
 

QRK2

LE
You can be arrested for carrying a Stanley knife in a public place, if you don’t have a lawful reason to do so. Carrying any bladed instrument in public for a job is okay, forgetting it’s on your belt and walking into a restaurant/bar/shop et al, will get you arrested. Forgetting is not lawful defence
Well yes and no.

It is an offence to carry any sharp or bladed instrument in a public place, with the exception of a folding pocket knife, which has a blade that is 7.62 cm (3 inches) or less. A lock knife is not a folding pocket knife and therefore it is an offence to carry around such a knife regardless of the length of the blade (if you do not have good reason).
 

QRK2

LE
I used to have a Gerber multitool and gerber knife on my belt, I only ever wore the belt or used the tools when I was in uniform.


I was on task once and a young cop commented on holding an illegal blade (I don’t even think the blade was above 3”), I thought he was joking, but the No2 later told me he kept bleating on about it when I was up the road.

He“d probably have had a heart attack if he knew what was in the bomb van.
Well it was well over 3", but a particularly mince police officer once tried to confiscate a sword from a colleague of mine. It was on the back seat of his car with his No 1 dress and the copper was on the cordon for the Lord Mayor's show in which said colleague was about to participate.
 

HE117

LE
HE117 said:
We have the same problem with cameras in mobile phones being banned in schools..!

Off topic but that's not a problem, it's an excellent idea.
You are perfectly entitled to your opinion..

I however disagree... apart from the issue that nearly all mobile phone and all smart phones have cameras, the issue is one of controlling the wrong thing. If you think an individual is present in a school that will take inappropriate photos, then they should not be there in the first place. My view is that just banning objects is not a viable solution.. ban specific people if you like.. best of luck with that!
 
You are perfectly entitled to your opinion..

I however disagree... apart from the issue that nearly all mobile phone and all smart phones have cameras, the issue is one of controlling the wrong thing. If you think an individual is present in a school that will take inappropriate photos, then they should not be there in the first place.
I totally agree with you on that. It is however unrealistic in the extreme.

Case in point, one child repeatedly stabbed another in the neck with a compass a few months ago.

Were police called? No.
Was said child expelled? No.
Was said child given a bit of a talking to, a day off and then a fresh start? Yes.

You have to be a seriously nasty ******** in repeated ways with evidence before anyone even considers kicking you out of a state school. Potentially taking photos of students/staff? Wouldn't raise an eyebrow.

My view is that just banning objects is not a viable solution.. ban specific people if you like.. best of luck with that!
You've answered your own point, banning people does not work, banning objects does. If kids leave phones turned on and set to silent in their bags, no one knows they have them and everyone gets along fine.

Until someone sets their phone up as a wireless hotspot that can be seen by school devices named "SHOUT PENIS FOR PASSWORD" but that's a different conversation.
 
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HE117

LE
I have a friend who worked as a professional outdoor activities instructor, he is qualified in climbing, kayaking and all that stuff but also teaches bushcraft from time to time. He took a group of his mates out to some nearby woodland which was privately owned to practise some buschraft, much of which involves using cutting tools. He did not have the land owners permission. Somebody called the police with a report of a group of lads messing around with knives in the woods.

The police turned up and arrested them all for armed tresspass. The incident reeked of the landowner being a drinking mate of the police officer but off they went to the station anyway. My mate foolishly accepted a caution in exchange for them dropping the armed tresspass nonsense. He now has a permanent knife crime record and cannot work with children. His career requires him to work with children and so he has had to find a new one.
I have to admit I am in two minds over this one.. as a professional outdoors activities instructor, your mate should have been rather more considerate before conducting field craft in someone else's property without permission!

Regardless of the legal situation, I think it's just rude not to ask permission... but getting Plod in to deal with it, and the outcome is not right either!

We need to stop and step back from the current levels of state involvement in what is frankly private business.
 
I have to admit I am in two minds over this one.. as a professional outdoors activities instructor, your mate should have been rather more considerate before conducting field craft in someone else's property without permission!

Regardless of the legal situation, I think it's just rude not to ask permission... but getting Plod in to deal with it, and the outcome is not right either!

We need to stop and step back from the current levels of state involvement in what is frankly private business.
Trespass is a civil offence unless criminal damage is caused, so no Plod needed unless they’ve been cutting trees down or similar.
 
Trespass is a civil offence unless criminal damage is caused, so no Plod needed unless they’ve been cutting trees down or similar.
Indeed and, unless armed trespass necessitates a police response, it could have been solved with the landowner walking down and saying to the group"You aren't welcome here, please bugger off".

Not a copper but this seems pretty comprehensive from the CPS - https://www.cps.gov.uk/sites/defaul...TATUTORY-OFFENCES-INVOLVING-TRESPASS-2019.pdf

I would think that falls under "Trespass with a weapon of offence". Happy to be corrected.
 
I carry a resqme


I used to drive a lot so considered this a useful item to have.

Believe it or not some morons think it's an offensive bit of kit. For slicing folk and breaking windscreens.

Rather than cutting your seatbelt and popping your window, if you're trapped in your car.

My boot usually contains my canoeing first aid kit, rescue saw and axe. Also a couple of throw lines and pulleys, carabineers and cordage. And tape, plastic, hot glue sticks, and tools. For no other reason than I know that it's there and I once used a red light stock to replace my tail light when two blew in quick succession.
 
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Indeed and, unless armed trespass necessitates a police response, it could have been solved with the landowner walking down and saying to the group"You aren't welcome here, please bugger off".

Not a copper but this seems pretty comprehensive from the CPS - https://www.cps.gov.uk/sites/defaul...TATUTORY-OFFENCES-INVOLVING-TRESPASS-2019.pdf

I would think that falls under "Trespass with a weapon of offence". Happy to be corrected.
Hmm... a kayak instructor would be well versed in the difficult access situation in the U.K. and should have known better. He could argue that even though he is trespassing, an axe (eg) is a ‘tool of the trade’ so he isn’t an ‘armed trespasser’ and ”get off moi laaand” would be the appropriate response.
I meet a guy in my local woods occasionally, teaching bushcraft to a gang of yoofs from the local special school, knives, bush hooks and chainsaws are frequently in evidence but no one gives a toss, the kids are having fun, usually ask politely if they can stroke my “f*cking dog” and there’s never an Armed Response Vehicle around.
All about perceptions I guess.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I seem to recall Gerbers are fairly easy to dismantle with an Allen key. You could just buy a Gerber and remove the offending blade.
 

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