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Blackburn Beverley for sale

Although I never visited it, I always got the impression that Fort Paull museum was a bit of a pikey affair and not run very professionally. Mind you. they managed to hang on to their Beverley when the RAF Museum didn't.
Probably due to having copious amounts of DULUX plastered all over it when it was in a car-park in Beverley.
 
Although I never visited it, I always got the impression that Fort Paull museum was a bit of a pikey affair and not run very professionally. Mind you. they managed to hang on to their Beverley when the RAF Museum didn't.

I didn't visit, but I did go to the Transport Museum in Beverley a few times. What I did notice on a photo of Fort Paull was stairs or ramps for access to most of the exhibits. That doesn't happen everywhere.
 
I didn't visit, but I did go to the Transport Museum in Beverley a few times. What I did notice on a photo of Fort Paull was stairs or ramps for access to most of the exhibits. That doesn't happen everywhere.

As mentioned before, the teenaged Jack would climb a wall above a 50' drop to explore the tunnels and drink zyderrr at Fort Paull and forage for left-over kit.
I do miss the museum in Beverley when I go back up there. It was rather decent with changing exhibitions but in an inadequate building that could not keep the weather out.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
Irrespective of gauge considerations, I am quite surprised at the extent railway concerns rely upon road transportation for the movement of stock to various engineering plants etc.

Even within a self-contained network such as that of TfL, locomotives and cars are very often transported by road between one TfL facility and another.
 
Irrespective of gauge considerations, I am quite surprised at the extent railway concerns rely upon road transportation for the movement of stock to various engineering plants etc.

Even within a self-contained network such as that of TfL, locomotives and cars are very often transported by road between one TfL facility and another.

I think the reason is it's difficult to fit these movements into the existing rail timetables.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Irrespective of gauge considerations, I am quite surprised at the extent railway concerns rely upon road transportation for the movement of stock to various engineering plants etc.

Even within a self-contained network such as that of TfL, locomotives and cars are very often transported by road between one TfL facility and another.
TfL is a grouping of several separate concerns and would rather pull itself apart than show joined up thinking!
 
If that logic was applied universally we wouldn't have any exhibits in museums.

It's not about raw cost, it's about preserving heritage.

Published by: Alexandra Wood, Yorkshire Post, on Sunday 04 October 2020.

World's last Blackburn Beverley aircraft saved by plan to create amazing holiday let.

THE businessman who has saved the world’s last Blackburn Beverley aircraft from the scrapheap has revealed plans to turn it into a unique Airbnb let – with a jacuzzi in the nose cone.

Pilot Martyn Wiseman, who has an airfield near Selby, Birchwood Lodge, bought the giant aircraft at auction earlier this month. having had his eye on it for a year.

Mr Wiseman has already converted an eight-seater Hawker executive plane, which was once at the beck and call of the Russian jet set, into a luxury crash pad. It featured on George Clarke’s Channel 4 show Amazing Spaces.

But those plans are dwarfed by his vision for the transport plane, which will take six months to dismantle – the engines weigh two tonnes each – and then move by crane and lowloader from Paull Fort to his airfield.

1601984418014.png

Martyn Wiseman couldn't bear the prospect of the giant plane being cut up for scrap Picture: Simon Hulme

There is even a possibility the parts could get flown the 33 miles distance if the RAF decides to get its heavy-lift Chinook helicopter fleet involved.

The conversion will see the area where the paratroopers once waited to jump turned into two bedrooms, while the main cargo hold – which could carry 94 troops – will be a kitchen and dining area.

And for the evening G&T where else? The cockpit where the pilot and co-pilots seats will be reupholstered and put on swivels, and guests can watch as aircraft land on Mr Wiseman’s runway.

Mr Wiseman said the day before the auction scrap dealers from London had pushed the price of the plane up to £18,000.

1601984610730.png

The massive hold will be turned into a kitchen and dining area Picture: Simon Hulme

The final bill for the aircraft together with parts like tyres came to £34,000. Both he and philanthropist Georg Von der Muehll, a Swiss banker, have chipped in £28,000 each.

Both share a passion for “radial” aircraft – those with engines with cylinders which radiate outwards from the central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel – and neither could bear the prospect of seeing the aircraft chopped up for scrap.

Some people had hoped it would remain a museum, but Mr Wiseman said “simple commercial reality” had to prevail. Nothing would be thrown away, with some internal fittings going on display in a separate building.

Mr Wiseman, who has a civil engineering firm and also makes bespoke experimental designs for light aircraft, said: “You have to be realistic. As a museum it’s not an attraction – people will come once and that’s it.


1601984724706.png
In future years where better to have a glass of wine or a G&T? Picture Simon Hulme

"We don’t have the funds to restore this back to its original condition and maintain it for the next 50 years without it paying its own way. This will virtually guarantee it as long as I am around because it will be self-funding.

“This will be an absolute one off – there will be nothing else in the world like it.

“We will call the aircraft Georg as a thank you and have said we will teach him how to fly.”

He his plans for the plane secret, until a week before the auction. He said: “My wife wasn’t keen at all. I was chatting to Georg and he popped his share of the money through and then I had to confess to my wife – she took a bit of persuading.”

A crowdfunding appeal will be launched on Sunday to try and raise £100,000 to move and rebuild the plane.

Mr Wiseman said there would be a number of different levels, with those who donate the largest sums getting the chance to come to learn to fly radial aircraft at Birchwood Lodge –once part of RAF Riccall, which was a bomber base during WW2.

He said: “There are 444,000 rivets – if everybody would chip in £1 per rivet - we’d be done, finished.”
The plane will have to be cleaned to deal with corrosion.


 
If he's looking for the pax seats that were in it when Hull Flying Club bought it from Court Lines, they went to 152 City of Hull Sqn ATC for use in the NCO's crew room. And jolly comfortable they were too.
 
Published by: Alexandra Wood, Yorkshire Post, on Sunday 04 October 2020.

World's last Blackburn Beverley aircraft saved by plan to create amazing holiday let.

THE businessman who has saved the world’s last Blackburn Beverley aircraft from the scrapheap has revealed plans to turn it into a unique Airbnb let – with a jacuzzi in the nose cone.

Pilot Martyn Wiseman, who has an airfield near Selby, Birchwood Lodge, bought the giant aircraft at auction earlier this month. having had his eye on it for a year.

Mr Wiseman has already converted an eight-seater Hawker executive plane, which was once at the beck and call of the Russian jet set, into a luxury crash pad. It featured on George Clarke’s Channel 4 show Amazing Spaces.

But those plans are dwarfed by his vision for the transport plane, which will take six months to dismantle – the engines weigh two tonnes each – and then move by crane and lowloader from Paull Fort to his airfield.

View attachment 510067
Martyn Wiseman couldn't bear the prospect of the giant plane being cut up for scrap Picture: Simon Hulme

There is even a possibility the parts could get flown the 33 miles distance if the RAF decides to get its heavy-lift Chinook helicopter fleet involved.

The conversion will see the area where the paratroopers once waited to jump turned into two bedrooms, while the main cargo hold – which could carry 94 troops – will be a kitchen and dining area.

And for the evening G&T where else? The cockpit where the pilot and co-pilots seats will be reupholstered and put on swivels, and guests can watch as aircraft land on Mr Wiseman’s runway.

Mr Wiseman said the day before the auction scrap dealers from London had pushed the price of the plane up to £18,000.

View attachment 510070
The massive hold will be turned into a kitchen and dining area Picture: Simon Hulme

The final bill for the aircraft together with parts like tyres came to £34,000. Both he and philanthropist Georg Von der Muehll, a Swiss banker, have chipped in £28,000 each.

Both share a passion for “radial” aircraft – those with engines with cylinders which radiate outwards from the central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel – and neither could bear the prospect of seeing the aircraft chopped up for scrap.

Some people had hoped it would remain a museum, but Mr Wiseman said “simple commercial reality” had to prevail. Nothing would be thrown away, with some internal fittings going on display in a separate building.

Mr Wiseman, who has a civil engineering firm and also makes bespoke experimental designs for light aircraft, said: “You have to be realistic. As a museum it’s not an attraction – people will come once and that’s it.


View attachment 510071In future years where better to have a glass of wine or a G&T? Picture Simon Hulme

"We don’t have the funds to restore this back to its original condition and maintain it for the next 50 years without it paying its own way. This will virtually guarantee it as long as I am around because it will be self-funding.

“This will be an absolute one off – there will be nothing else in the world like it.

“We will call the aircraft Georg as a thank you and have said we will teach him how to fly.”

He his plans for the plane secret, until a week before the auction. He said: “My wife wasn’t keen at all. I was chatting to Georg and he popped his share of the money through and then I had to confess to my wife – she took a bit of persuading.”

A crowdfunding appeal will be launched on Sunday to try and raise £100,000 to move and rebuild the plane.

Mr Wiseman said there would be a number of different levels, with those who donate the largest sums getting the chance to come to learn to fly radial aircraft at Birchwood Lodge –once part of RAF Riccall, which was a bomber base during WW2.

He said: “There are 444,000 rivets – if everybody would chip in £1 per rivet - we’d be done, finished.”
The plane will have to be cleaned to deal with corrosion.


I hope it works out, if the conversion is carried out correctly that would be one hell of a holiday home!
 
Irrespective of gauge considerations, I am quite surprised at the extent railway concerns rely upon road transportation for the movement of stock to various engineering plants etc.

Even within a self-contained network such as that of TfL, locomotives and cars are very often transported by road between one TfL facility and another.


the rail depot in Eastleigh is accessed by a narrow road bridge with a 90 degree corner on each side. thank goodness they don't need to move large and heavy objects over it...


oh

1602024340766.png
 
Not so great news; "In the months prior to the auction, volunteers of the Fort Paull Battery Heritage Site CIC (FPBHS CIC) have done their utmost to guarantee the future of the Beverley as a museum object. They were completely smashed by the news that the Beverley will be converted into a luxurious B&B. In an official announcement the Fort Paull Battery Heritage Site CIC states: “In the last couple of days, the CIC learnt of Martin Wiseman’s plan to convert the Beverley into holiday accommodation via a news article. He did not contact or inform us of any information prior to the press release (an additional grievance to the hard work so many have committed). The Fort Paull Battery Heritage Site CIC does not support this decision in any manner, and we will not facilitate this to take place. Over the past months our team has been working exceptionally hard meticulously planning the movement, restoration and archival process of the Beverley.” And: “FPBHS CIC cannot assist as it fundamentally goes against our moral, ethical, and historical stance. Therefore, as of the 6th of October 2020 at 10.00 hrs LT we, the FPBHS CIC, remove all our assistance, financial and otherwise from this now personal business venture.”
From; Dispute over a Beverley
 
Ref the above, the prospective owner was under no obligation to consult with anyone over what he planned to do with his purchase. The statement smacks of sour grapes. Would they rather the scrap dealers bought it? At least this way it survives
 
Ref the above, the prospective owner was under no obligation to consult with anyone over what he planned to do with his purchase. The statement smacks of sour grapes. Would they rather the scrap dealers bought it? At least this way it survives

Not clear in the article quoted, but reading between the lines - had the museum group been working with the successful buyer, and now feel they have been cr*pped on for some reason?
 
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