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Black Woolly Hat?

#3
thinslate are sold in many shops are cheap and seem to do the job. Although they dont do a wool one they do some nitted man made thing. A woolly hat is not much good if it rains.
 
#6
PassingBells said:
Actually it is. Wool will keep your head warm, even if it gets wet.
Actually, and just for a laugh and to shatter a myth, can you back that up with genuine proven facts, PassingBells?

MsG
 
#7
PassingBells said:
Actually it is. Wool will keep your head warm, even if it gets wet.
Did you have to get intimate with sheep to research this fact?
 
#8
Bugsy said:
PassingBells said:
Actually it is. Wool will keep your head warm, even if it gets wet.
Actually, and just for a laugh and to shatter a myth, can you back that up with genuine proven facts, PassingBells?

MsG
Genuine proven facts, no. But it's a fairly well known fact, which is why people have worn it in cold places for years.

A quick google gives this link: http://www.psychovertical.com/?wool

but I'm sure there are some better links out there.

PB
 
#10
When wool is damp evaporation of the moisture releases latent heat, resulting in an increase in temperature. That is why hardy Scots used to dunk thier tartans in the burn before bedding down for the night.
 
#12
still21inmymind said:
When wool is damp evaporation of the moisture releases latent heat, resulting in an increase in temperature. That is why hardy Scots used to dunk thier tartans in the burn before bedding down for the night.
It was many years ago, but I remember heating a flask of water over a bunsen burner and showing that an extra burst of heat was needed to achieve boiling point. So if the heat of your head causes evaporation, you are losing the latent heat involved.

Release of latent heat occurs on condensation, which is one of the reasons that it tends to get warmer when it rains.

But perhaps this is a wah?
 
#14
Get your Gran to knit you one, mind did and still got it after 24 years! She'd dead now or I'd get her to knit you one, top quality!
 
#16
Bugsy said:
PassingBells said:
Actually it is. Wool will keep your head warm, even if it gets wet.
Actually, and just for a laugh and to shatter a myth, can you back that up with genuine proven facts, PassingBells?

MsG
Each wool fiber (measuring about a thousandth of an inch in diameter, depending on the grade) consists of a bundle of corticle cells, made up of polypeptide chains arranged in coils. These corticle cells are wrapped up in a scaly outer layer called a cuticle, which in turn is covered by a filmy skin called an epicuticle. The epicuticle actually sheds drops of water.

But the real genius of the wool fiber lies in its ability to cope with the high humidity that you may get during rainstorms or at other times. The sheep (they may look stupid, but it's all an act) have cleverly equipped the epicuticle with tiny pores that allow water vapor to pass through to the core, where it's chemically absorbed. A single fibre can slurp up to 30 percent of its own weight in moisture without feeling wet.

Wool does act as a natural insulator, thanks to its built-in crimp. The fibers repel each other, keeping a bit of dead air in between them. But it's the epicuticle that does the heavy lifting when it comes to keeping you warm despite the wet.
 
#17
Vasco said:
still21inmymind said:
When wool is damp evaporation of the moisture releases latent heat, resulting in an increase in temperature. That is why hardy Scots used to dunk thier tartans in the burn before bedding down for the night.
It was many years ago, but I remember heating a flask of water over a bunsen burner and showing that an extra burst of heat was needed to achieve boiling point. So if the heat of your head causes evaporation, you are losing the latent heat involved.

Release of latent heat occurs on condensation, which is one of the reasons that it tends to get warmer when it rains.

But perhaps this is a wah?
The latent heat is 'leeched' from the water droplets and not the surface (i.e. your heed, bod etc) on which they rest.
 
#18
What's a good wooly hat you can wear under your Battle Bowler?
 
#19
Food for thought.

Have a look through II with yer black hat on.

a excellent aiming mark.

Should read only to be worn sub-surface.
 

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