Black police leaders are threatening to take legal action

#1
here
The Times said:
From The Times
March 08, 2007

Police face bias claim as ‘smeared’ Asian officer is denied promotion
Stewart Tendler, Crime Correspondent
Black police leaders are threatening to take legal action after the controversial Iranian-born officer Ali Dizaei was turned down for promotion yesterday.

Chief Superintendent Dizaei applied to become a commander, the fifth-highest rank at Scotland Yard. But a promotions board of the Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) advised by Sir Ian Blair, the commissioner, selected three other candidates for vacant posts.

Mr Dizaei said that he would wait for feedback on his performance, but supporters accused the selectors of being biased. The MPA rejected the claim, and said that the authority had “appointed the people we judged to be up to the challenge. We did not appoint those whom we judged were not, or were not yet ready.”

Last week The Times published excerpts from Mr Dizaei’s autobiography, Not One of Us, in which he attacked the police’s handling of a four-year corruption investigation, and criticised individual officers. He said that a group of officers wanted to destroy his reputation and career. He was cleared by the Old Bailey in 2003 of perverting the course of justice and misconduct in public office.

Mr Dizaei, who is in charge of policing in the West London borough of Hounslow, said that he was disappointed by the result of his application, and would review his position after examining the feedback.

Mr Dizaei is a senior member of the National Black Police Association. Keith Jarrett, president of the association, said yesterday that he would be seeking an urgent meeting with Sir Ian. He said that he wanted to know why Mr Dizaei had been denied promotion when he led one of the best-performing boroughs in London, and had been graded as “exceptional” in his personal assessment. If the commissioner’s answers were not satisfactory, Mr Jarrett said, the association would take the matter further, possibly to an employment tribunal.

Mr Jarrett said that in the past five years there had been no promotions of senior black or Asian officers in the force. “I do not want to start levelling accusations of racism, but it worries me it could be a personal vendetta against Ali.”

The Metropolitan Police Black Police Association said: “We suspect the decision of the MPA was not free from bias and could not have been reached on the basis of objective and fair criteria.”

Len Duvall, chairman of the police authority, denied the “unwarranted attack”, saying that its appointments “were based, rationally and fairly, on merit” and that the three appointed officers were the best qualified for promotion at this time.
I didn't realise that Iranians were "black".
Is this trying to drum up publicity for his book?
 
#2
Surprise surprise! crap at his job,whines when he does not get what he wants and plays the good old racist card!
 
#3
Did he not get promotion because he is "ethnic" or simply because he just aint good enough?
 
#4
He's got a massive chip on his shoulder (and like you said a book to advertise.) Maybe, just maybe, there might be the smallest chance of a possibilty that he wasn't suitable for promotion!!
 
#6
He was on with Paxman last night. Must admit he came over quite reasonably but wouldn't commit despite Paxman's blatantly obvious attempt to up the tempo. In fact, he knocked the wind right out of Paxmans sails, which is always nice to see.

He told Paxman that he wouldn't comment upon the promotion thing until he'd seen his feedback.

Paxman had previously tried to get him to comment on the incident in Sheffield and credit to the bloke, he told Paxman that he himself had been in similar situations and having viewed the footage and having seen past the intial reactions, he said the bloke did alright, but added that the IPCC should investigate it.

Anyone hear the Liberal reaction to the Sheffield thing today on Radio 2? Looks like Clegg has the copper sacked and convicted already.
 
#7
So he was graded exceptional. So what? Anyone at that level should be at that level of competance as well. The fact that he is number 4 in a list of 6 excellent candidates should not be seen as disrespectful, rascist or even unfair.

It is simply he, this time, hasn't made the promotion line in line with the number of available positions.

Tough. Keep working, maintain the same standard and maybe next time he'll make it.

Quite pathetic
 
#8
Provost_Marshal said:
He was on with Paxman last night. Must admit he came over quite reasonably but wouldn't commit despite Paxman's blatantly obvious attempt to up the tempo. In fact, he knocked the wind right out of Paxmans sails, which is always nice to see.

He told Paxman that he wouldn't comment upon the promotion thing until he'd seen his feedback.

Paxman had previously tried to get him to comment on the incident in Sheffield and credit to the bloke, he told Paxman that he himself had been in similar situations and having viewed the footage and having seen past the intial reactions, he said the bloke did alright, but added that the IPCC should investigate it.

Anyone hear the Liberal reaction to the Sheffield thing today on Radio 2? Looks like Clegg has the copper sacked and convicted already.
here Grauniad quoting Clegg, Chakrabarti & O'Connor (formerly of Scotland Yard)

Grauniad said:
The Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman and MP for Sheffield Hallam, Nick Clegg, said: "The violence in this footage is shocking, especially as it took place as several officers were holding down one woman ... Public confidence in the police at times like this can only be restored if an investigation is rapid, thorough and independent."

Shami Chakrabarti, the director of Liberty, said: "These images turn the stomach and raise serious questions about police misconduct. The IPCC must investigate urgently in the knowledge that public confidence in modern policing and the police complaints system is at stake."

However, the former Scotland Yard commander John O'Connor told GMTV: "This is a woman who is completely out of control. She has caused £250 worth of damage to somebody else's car, is completely out of her head, and they try and subdue her.

"There is no question of them using pepper sprays on her or using truncheons or whatever. They have tried to subdue her in the best way they can."
Well said Mr O'Connor :thumright:
 
#9
rockape34 said:
here
The Times said:
From The Times
March 08, 2007

Police face bias claim as ‘smeared’ Asian officer is denied promotion
Stewart Tendler, Crime Correspondent
Black police leaders are threatening to take legal action after the controversial Iranian-born officer Ali Dizaei was turned down for promotion yesterday.

Chief Superintendent Dizaei applied to become a commander, the fifth-highest rank at Scotland Yard. But a promotions board of the Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) advised by Sir Ian Blair, the commissioner, selected three other candidates for vacant posts.

Mr Dizaei said that he would wait for feedback on his performance, but supporters accused the selectors of being biased. The MPA rejected the claim, and said that the authority had “appointed the people we judged to be up to the challenge. We did not appoint those whom we judged were not, or were not yet ready.”

Last week The Times published excerpts from Mr Dizaei’s autobiography, Not One of Us, in which he attacked the police’s handling of a four-year corruption investigation, and criticised individual officers. He said that a group of officers wanted to destroy his reputation and career. He was cleared by the Old Bailey in 2003 of perverting the course of justice and misconduct in public office.

Mr Dizaei, who is in charge of policing in the West London borough of Hounslow, said that he was disappointed by the result of his application, and would review his position after examining the feedback.

Mr Dizaei is a senior member of the National Black Police Association. Keith Jarrett, president of the association, said yesterday that he would be seeking an urgent meeting with Sir Ian. He said that he wanted to know why Mr Dizaei had been denied promotion when he led one of the best-performing boroughs in London, and had been graded as “exceptional” in his personal assessment. If the commissioner’s answers were not satisfactory, Mr Jarrett said, the association would take the matter further, possibly to an employment tribunal.

Mr Jarrett said that in the past five years there had been no promotions of senior black or Asian officers in the force. “I do not want to start levelling accusations of racism, but it worries me it could be a personal vendetta against Ali.”

The Metropolitan Police Black Police Association said: “We suspect the decision of the MPA was not free from bias and could not have been reached on the basis of objective and fair criteria.”

Len Duvall, chairman of the police authority, denied the “unwarranted attack”, saying that its appointments “were based, rationally and fairly, on merit” and that the three appointed officers were the best qualified for promotion at this time.
I didn't realise that Iranians were "black".
Is this trying to drum up publicity for his book?
Could it not be that he is GREEN with envy and GREEN police officers don't have an association?

Just thought I'd throw another colour into the equation.
 
#11
Wolf said:
Is the Black Police Association for any policeman who isn't white? Sounds a bit discriminatory to me.
Theres a few coppers in the TA on here, any "non-black" ones want to attempt to join this association, if you can't join i'd like to know how far you get in setting up a "caucasian police association".

TB
 
#12
Every other country seems to have a Police Force that they back when things start getting out of hand. Take the recent violence in Denmark over a youth club that got out of hand. It turns out that youth anarchist movements came in to fuel the violence so the Police arrested 650 and ended up bulldozing the youth centre over which the problems were occurring. This was after a couple of nights of rioting. Just because the police deal out a bit of 'strong arm of the law' every now and then does not make us a police state and the copper should be applauded for his actions and the country should take a reality pill and apply a bit of common sense. Toni Comer deserved everything she got.
 
#13
Wolf said:
Is the Black Police Association for any policeman who isn't white? Sounds a bit discriminatory to me.
Of course it discriminates but as we all know only white people are racist...... :blank:
 
#14
I think that the white police association should complain..............
Not being racist but I have always thought that a black police association is wrong, If anybody has a problem shouldnt the police association help/deal with the situation?
But then what do I know
 
#15
rockape34 said:
I didn't realise that Iranians were "black".
Is this trying to drum up publicity for his book?
The term 'black' used within the 'black and ethnic minority rights industry' refers to all non-white people in the UK. It is argued that since all ethnic minorities face the same prejudices, discrimination and racism, they can be labelled under the umbrella term 'black'. It is funny how this idea came from within the Afro-Caribbean voluntary sector, and that there were reservations from other ethnic minority communities about being labelled as black. However, in the end a 'pragmatic' consensus was agreed since it was thought that more 'positive' change could be brought about if ethnic minorities 'stood together as one'.

A number of years ago I had the miserable and infuriating task of designing a publicly funded (several hundred grand) publication for a small national black voluntary organisation. The general theme of the hundred or so pages was the inequality faced by black people within the health service. Prior to designing the book for the print-run I had the unenviable task of copy-editing the chaotic content. It soon became clear to me that the publication was inherently racist against white people. For a start, whenever the term black was mentioned (very often) a capital 'B' was used but whenever the term white was -- often derogatorily -- used there was no capital. The underlying theme of the document focussed on 'white hegemony' and 'oppression by whites'. It was produced to be one big guilt trip. I am sure that there were many phrases and terms used within the book that, had they been applied to black people by whites, the publication would have been in the hands of the police and charges may well have followed.

When I initially sent the copy back for proofing by the 'committee' I had made it so that both black and white were used without capitals. The document soon came back with vitriolic instructions to use capitals whenever the term black was used. I did so but also used capitals whenever the term white was mentioned, too. The document came back to me with instructions to remove the capitals from white but not Black.

Eventually the document went to print and the last minute I made a couple of subtle changes. On one of the pages I changed the word 'can't' with cnut and on another page I changed the word 'work' with 'wnak'. This should have caused some consternation since the document was used as the reference material by local and national government and throughout the NHS. All in all, it was a terribly miserable experience for me. However, I was smiling at the end of it since I earned 15 grand for two months work. No, I don't usually earn that type of money; yes I did rip them off.
 
#16
I reckon my premature hair loss kept me at lance jack. Is there a claim in that do you reckon?

Has anyone else suffered from the widespread baldist discrimination in the Forces or the country at large?
 
#18
Mr_Deputy said:
not_finished_yet said:
rockape34 said:
I didn't realise that Iranians were "black".
Is this trying to drum up publicity for his book?
The term 'black' used within the 'black and ethnic minority rights industry' refers to all non-white people in the UK. It is argued that since all ethnic minorities face the same prejudices, discrimination and racism, they can be labelled under the umbrella term 'black'. It is funny how this idea came from within the Afro-Caribbean voluntary sector, and that there were reservations from other ethnic minority communities about being labelled as black. However, in the end a 'pragmatic' consensus was agreed since it was thought that more 'positive' change could be brought about if ethnic minorities 'stood together as one'.

A number of years ago I had the miserable and infuriating task of designing a publicly funded (several hundred grand) publication for a small national black voluntary organisation. The general theme of the hundred or so pages was the inequality faced by black people within the health service. Prior to designing the book for the print-run I had the unenviable task of copy-editing the chaotic content. It soon became clear to me that the publication was inherently racist against white people. For a start, whenever the term black was mentioned (very often) a capital 'B' was used but whenever the term white was -- often derogatorily -- used there was no capital. The underlying theme of the document focussed on 'white hegemony' and 'oppression by whites'. It was produced to be one big guilt trip. I am sure that there were many phrases and terms used within the book that, had they been applied to black people by whites, the publication would have been in the hands of the police and charges may well have followed.

When I initially sent the copy back for proofing by the 'committee' I had made it so that both black and white were used without capitals. The document soon came back with vitriolic instructions to use capitals whenever the term black was used. I did so but also used capitals whenever the term white was mentioned, too. The document came back to me with instructions to remove the capitals from white but not Black.

Eventually the document went to print and the last minute I made a couple of subtle changes. On one of the pages I changed the word 'can't' with cnut and on another page I changed the word 'work' with 'wnak'. This should have caused some consternation since the document was used as the reference material by local and national government and throughout the NHS. All in all, it was a terribly miserable experience for me. However, I was smiling at the end of it since I earned 15 grand for two months work. No, I don't usually earn that type of money; yes I did rip them off.
Ha! Very illuminating to hear. Not 'surprised' at this but its interesting to hear it from the horse's mouth. Not calling you a Horse or saying that Horses are inferior or superior to humans there. Look, let's just leave it - ok?
Four legs good, two legs bad?
 
#19
Private_Pike said:
Mr_Deputy said:
not_finished_yet said:
rockape34 said:
I didn't realise that Iranians were "black".
Is this trying to drum up publicity for his book?
The term 'black' used within the 'black and ethnic minority rights industry' refers to all non-white people in the UK. It is argued that since all ethnic minorities face the same prejudices, discrimination and racism, they can be labelled under the umbrella term 'black'. It is funny how this idea came from within the Afro-Caribbean voluntary sector, and that there were reservations from other ethnic minority communities about being labelled as black. However, in the end a 'pragmatic' consensus was agreed since it was thought that more 'positive' change could be brought about if ethnic minorities 'stood together as one'.

A number of years ago I had the miserable and infuriating task of designing a publicly funded (several hundred grand) publication for a small national black voluntary organisation. The general theme of the hundred or so pages was the inequality faced by black people within the health service. Prior to designing the book for the print-run I had the unenviable task of copy-editing the chaotic content. It soon became clear to me that the publication was inherently racist against white people. For a start, whenever the term black was mentioned (very often) a capital 'B' was used but whenever the term white was -- often derogatorily -- used there was no capital. The underlying theme of the document focussed on 'white hegemony' and 'oppression by whites'. It was produced to be one big guilt trip. I am sure that there were many phrases and terms used within the book that, had they been applied to black people by whites, the publication would have been in the hands of the police and charges may well have followed.

When I initially sent the copy back for proofing by the 'committee' I had made it so that both black and white were used without capitals. The document soon came back with vitriolic instructions to use capitals whenever the term black was used. I did so but also used capitals whenever the term white was mentioned, too. The document came back to me with instructions to remove the capitals from white but not Black.

Eventually the document went to print and the last minute I made a couple of subtle changes. On one of the pages I changed the word 'can't' with cnut and on another page I changed the word 'work' with 'wnak'. This should have caused some consternation since the document was used as the reference material by local and national government and throughout the NHS. All in all, it was a terribly miserable experience for me. However, I was smiling at the end of it since I earned 15 grand for two months work. No, I don't usually earn that type of money; yes I did rip them off.
Ha! Very illuminating to hear. Not 'surprised' at this but its interesting to hear it from the horse's mouth. Not calling you a Horse or saying that Horses are inferior or superior to humans there. Look, let's just leave it - ok?
Four legs good, two legs bad?
Four legs good two legs better
 

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