Black cat this, Pongos...

Discussion in 'The NAAFI Bar' started by bernoulli, Jul 5, 2007.

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  1. It has been suggested on other means that the Paras should be able to include the Moors murders on their guidon, as Myra Hyndley is alleged to have owed her fine taste in men and her exquisitively sensitive moral compass to the beatings and abuse suffered at the hands of her ex-Para step dad.
    Para, schmara, they're Walts when it comes to mass murder- they had to send a lass out to do it for them. (unless you count Bloody Sunday :D ).

    In the same way that the Senior Service is entrusted with the UK nuclear deterrent, we have the sole, living, forces mass murderer; Frank Grimson.
    They believe that he killed far more than the two victims he was prosecuted for, and he demonstrated a fine sense of style by bumming one of them post-mortem.
    I actually feel a bit seen off, as I spent half of my career in Joanna's, and I never had a hunky, bald, 6' 2" bong-eyed, Pom stoker/ murdering sociopath make a pass at me. All I ever got was a do on one of the "Weather Girls", who used to loiter in the shadows by the door casting a baleful eye over the c0ck as it walked in..

    PSYCHOPATH Alan Grimson stood over the body of the teenage sailor he had just murdered and roared.

    The man now serving life for two murders, would later boast that he lifted his hands in triumph over the body of his victim, saying: ‘It was such a feeling. I have never, ever had that feeling. It was a feeling of power.

    ‘I would say it was better than sex.’

    Grimson was a man who wanted complete power and domination over young, good looking sailors as vengeance for his own physical ugliness.

    The homosexual would look at a group of young sailors – singling one of them out as a potential victim – and had done this since the start of his 22-year navy career.


    Killer’s dumping ground –
    police officers searching the countryside
    near Cheriton, where Grimson hid
    Nicholas Wright’s body in a hedgerow

    Grimson would give his telephone number to young sailors telling them if they ever needed a lift up north – where his family lived near Newcastle – to call him.

    But in December 1997, when 18-year-old Nicholas Wright spurned his sexual advances, Grimson beat him senseless with a baseball bat.

    The teenager cried out in pain, begging Grimson not to rape him.

    But Grimson later said he knew he would brutally murder Nicholas when in defeat the young man cried out: ‘Why don’t you kill me then?’

    Grimson then sliced off part of his right ear, cut his throat and threw his body to the floor.

    During a grisly interview with police, Grimson explained he wanted to dismember the body as a trophy.

    He also admitted performing a sex act on the dead body.

    The man who psychiatrists described as a psychopath, carried Nicholas’s broken body to the bathroom, dumped it in the bath, took a shower and went to sleep.

    The next day, he wrapped Nicholas in black bin liners and drove him to a shallow grave.

    Elated by what he dubbed the ‘Nicholas Wright experience’, Grimson sought out others to control and demean.

    He bragged to police: ‘There were some lucky people around who stayed with me. They were lucky because they avoided being killed’.

    A year later he found his next victim at the Hogshead pub in Palmerston Road, Southsea.

    Barman Sion Jenkins, 20, was good looking and vulnerable.

    When Grimson spotted him again at Joanna’s nightclub in Southsea he lured him to his flat at 143A London Road in North End.

    There he stripped Sion, tortured him and raped him several times, keeping him there overnight before leaving him bound by his wrists and ankles over the bath.

    Finally, he smashed his skull in with a baseball bat, killing him.

    Grimson later told police he didn’t get the same thrill as with Nicholas because Sion didn’t put up a fight.

    The hulking 6ft 1in petty officer also boasted he would have killed again if police had not caught him. He had bought two new baseball bats in preparation for the next slaughter.

    SERIAL KILLER IN NATURE IF NOT BY NUMBER

    JUDGE Mr Justice Cresswell had no doubts that murderer Alan Grimson was an extreme danger to the public.

    Jailing him for two life sentences, Mr Justice Cresswell told Grimson: ‘You are a serial killer in nature if not by number. You are a highly dangerous serial killer who killed two young men in horrifying and appalling circumstances.’

    The judge said there were aggravating features to his murders. They were:


    Two violent, wicked, cruel killings of two young men
    The fact they were carried out with ‘extreme violence’
    Breach of trust in the case of Nicholas Wright
    The luring of both victims for sexual purposes
    The manner of the killings
    The mutilation of Mr Wright’s body
    The prolonged torture of Sion Jenkins
    The delay in killing Mr Jenkins
    The fact Grimson told police he would have killed again
    Mr Justice Cresswell said: ‘I express the profound sympathy of the court and the public to the families of the two deceased young men

    ONE NAME KEPT COMING UP – GRIMSON

    AS HMS EDINBURGH ploughed the waves of the Mediterranean in November 1999 a Lynx helicopter loomed into view.

    On board was a team of detectives investigating the disappearance of a rookie sailor who had vanished after spending just a week on the ship.

    The three police officers came in search of teenager Nicholas Wright, prompted by Portsmouth’s most senior detective Steve Watts, who had triggered a review of cases involving long-term missing people.

    By the time they had finished their investigations they had unearthed a horrifying truth – a terrible end for Nicholas and a serial killer in the ranks of the Royal Navy.

    His name was Alan Grimson, a veteran petty officer – but a man who struck fear into the heart of every rookie sailor on board his ships.

    Grimson had served in every great ship in the late 20th century navy – Hermes, Invincible, Ark Royal and Illustrious.

    But in his later career he became a fire-fighting instructor at HMS Excellent on Horsea Island, Port Solent, where every sailor is taught to tackle blazes.

    There, in November 1997, Nicholas was to meet the man who would cut his life brutally short.

    Just a few weeks after the fateful meeting the 18-year-old fulfilled a childhood dream when HMS Edinburgh slipped away from Portsmouth for a week of exercises in the Channel.

    It was his first chance to taste life on the open seas. But it was to be his only taste.

    The popular teenager had planned to meet his grandfather at Portsmouth naval base’s Unicorn Gate on Saturday, December 13. He never turned up.

    Like sailors everywhere he wanted to celebrate his shore leave with a few beers, ending up at Joanna’s. So too did Alan Grimson.

    In the Southsea club Grimson chatted to Nicholas – then invited the youngster back to his North End flat.

    Nicholas agreed. He wanted only a night-cap, but Grimson, a sadistic homosexual, made a pass at the teenager – who spurned his sexual advances.

    The price of his refusal was brutal murder.

    As night fell, Alan Grimson stuffed Nicholas’s body into his car, wrapped in plastic, then drove to a secluded spot beside the A272 near the village of Cheriton and hid the body in a hedgerow.

    Two years on, in the wardroom of HMS Edinburgh, the detectives from Portsmouth sat down to quiz the dozen or so crew still on board from late 1997 about Nicholas’s brief spell aboard and his disappearance.

    In preliminary investigations into Nicholas’s disappearance one name had kept coming up: Alan Grimson.

    The evidence they gathered on HMS Edinburgh sealed the fate of Grimson. At 6am on Wednesday, December 15, 1999 police swooped on his flat: 143a London Road, North End.

    As Grimson was whisked away for questioning, his landlord told police of the sailor’s strange behaviour in late 1997.

    The rating had redecorated his entire flat, replacing the carpet – which had been soaked in blood during Nicholas’s murder.

    In custody Grimson remained silent apart from denying knowing Nicholas. But a night in the cells had a profound effect on the then 40-year-old. The next morning he told police he wanted to talk.

    In the interview suite of Alton police station detectives Terry Fitzjohn and Neil Cunningham sat back and listened to Grimson reveal the dark secret he had been keeping for two years.

    Yes, he knew Nicholas. Yes, he met him at Joanna’s. Yes, he had taken him back to his flat, and there he had killed him.

    When the interview tapes finished Grimson led the detectives to the young sailor’s final resting place – just over two years to the day Grimson had dumped his body there.

    The find did not close the book on Alan Grimson’s murdering. As the police interviews drew to an end, Terry Fitzjohn leaned across the table one last time.

    ‘Is there anything else you think we ought to know?’ The question rarely provokes a response, but Alan Grimson peered back at the police officers.

    ‘Yes, there’s one more.

    ’ The detectives drew a sharp intake of breath. As he had done with Nicholas Wright’s fate, Grimson continued to outline the last hours of a man he knew only as ‘Shaun’.

    Grimson led detectives back to Brick Kiln Lane at West Tisted.

    There, hidden in undergrowth, lay the body of 20-year-old Sion Jenkins. He was only identified by his palm print and dental records.

    The barman had worked at the Hogshead in Palmerston Road, Southsea, but had not been seen since December 1998. No-one, not even his family, had reported him missing.

    Now 12 months later his fate, like Nicholas Wright’s, had finally been unearthed.

    On Christmas Eve 1998 Alan Grimson appeared before magistrates in Portsmouth charged with the two men’s murder.

    But the court appearances were not the end of investigations into Alan Grimson’s murderous behaviour.

    Detectives wanted to build up a complete picture of the man known to naval colleagues as ‘Frank’ – short for Frankenstein because of his dominating frame.

    But officers wanted to know if Grimson had committed other murders.

    Inquiries were made around the wold in ports Grimson had visited – in case there were other unnamed victims to be found in unmarked graves.

    A JEKYLL AND HYDE CHARACTER

    TO THE men and women who served with him, Alan Grimson was very much a Jekyll and Hyde character.

    All agreed he was good at his job – some liked him – but others who served alongside him sensed he had a darker side.

    ‘I found him a cold, cruel and calculated individual,’ said one senior rate now serving in HMS Edinburgh.

    ‘He had a stare which could look right through you.

    ‘He would glare at people from his stocky frame, with his short-cropped hair. Scary.

    ‘He was always hard on the new lads – you could call him a bully, intimidating.

    ‘I didn’t like him and there are a lot of the lads who still feel that way – not just because of the murders.’

    Another senior rate from Gosport, who served with Grimson two decades ago in carriers, said: ‘He was a big lad, and the young more impressionable sailors tended to be a bit frightened of him. I always found him okay, the sort of guy you would want to serve alongside. But he was always a bit of a loner. You never saw him with women – although no-one ever considered him effeminate.’

    Grimson has served on Hermes, Invincible, Illustrious and Ark Royal. He was an expert firefighter – so much so he was sent to New Zealand for three months – from June to September 1998 – training sailors to tackle blazes aboard ships.

    ‘I found he was a good guy,’ said Lieutenant Fraser McGhie ‘He did his job pretty well with no problems.

    ‘To say we were shocked is putting it lightly.’

    Grimson loved football and rugby and drank at ‘Ruby’s’ – The Royal Standard – in Edinburgh Road, Portsmouth’s favourite naval pub. And even if Grimson may have seemed aloof, what happened those few days before Christmas 1999 shocked everyone.

    ‘Looking back you can say there were things about Alan that were a bit strange,’ one former colleague in HMS Invincible said.

    ‘Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you would never have believed Alan was capable of murder.’

    Now police wonder how many murders Alan - a man described in court as evil beyond belief - was capable of.

    Back to top
     
  2. All you have to do now is start kiillng people OUTSIDE the navy, instead of surrendering to them, and we'll all be happy...:D
     
  3. All I remember about visiting Joannas night club in the late 80's from Bordon was the sticky carpets. Could it of been blood?
     
  4. Think your looking for "Rum Ration" or is it "Bum Ration".....
     
  5. Sadly, Joanna's has closed down. Apparently there was no place for sticky carpets, birds in Ron Hills dancing around their hand bags, and dwarves manning the ones and twos in Bliar's Britain.. :-(
     
  6. is that not standard Army pulling techniques he's using??
     
  7. You would eat the base ball bat BB :wink:
     
  8. So, you've only had one murderer, well matelot boy we've had Tony Jasinkyj (don't go cycling down by the Basingstoke Canal) and Neilson....both Slop Jockeys as well. So 2-1 to us.
     
  9. What about Dirty Den off Eastenders, Not only does he slot German cabbies but he w@nks live on the internet too.


    An example to us all
     
  10. old_fat_and_hairy

    old_fat_and_hairy LE Book Reviewer Reviews Editor

    Danish tour reps, anyone?
     
  11. A p*ss poor rejoinder, soldier boy. Polish-sounding bloke could only be arrsed to off one person, and Neilson had been outside for years before he started blocking up the drains with rotting human tissue. I suppose you will want to credit Fred West as well, just because he looked like an ACF instructor? :roll:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Dirty Den...how could we forget. And Ping, Pong and Pang the crazy Mini Moke Kru.

    Hey and whilst we're at it Captain Pugwash...quite a few of ours were clever enough to tell lies and get off with it!
     
  13. old_fat_and_hairy

    old_fat_and_hairy LE Book Reviewer Reviews Editor

    Harry Roberts. Ex Greenjacket. Shot and killed 2 policemen
     
  14. Makes you prahd t' be a Lahndenah :cry:
     
  15. Idi Amin amongst others trained at Sandhurst..................Checkmate?