Birdsong

#3
Tell me about it, it doesn't really do the book justice, I'd have thought that Birdsong would need at least 3 episodes to get the whole story across.
 
#6
I read the book a while back - thought at the time it followed the well know 'lions lead by donkeys' war weary cynicism path much beloved by novelists - which might have had some bearing in 1917 but in 1916 before the first battle of the Somme? Naah not impressed - trying too hard to press all the right buttons
 
#7
The military side was the usual BBC liberal luvvie gash; they obviously spent a shed load of money on the trench scenes, yet seem to have neither looked at a few photos of what trenches actually looked like, nor consulted anyone who has served in the army and who might be able to illuminate how officers and ORs functioned together in the typical busy trench routine of the time. Instead we get the usual BBC portrayal of effete, arrogant, distant officers, forelock-tugging noble ORs, and an emphasis on class war rather than war against ze Germans....
 
#8
All a bit fey. As a bit of a sucker (hur hur) for boobies I have this on. What was the short stabby thing he pulled on the semi-naked brass? Didn't look too like the bayonet of the time.

Next scene -Move on to a red arsed Lt giving a lefty appreciation of why the first day of the Somme failed. "We will be attacking uphill." To be shocked at that prospect, he'd obviously never been to [name a range/dry trg area] then.
 
#9
I tried to read the book, but gave up after several goes, so hopefully the film will inspire me to try again.

It must hsve something going for it, Chef's law of books states;

'The better a book is, the less likely you are to find it in a charity shop.'

You won't very often find Robert Rankin or Prachett in the charity shops, but Dan Brown, McNab et al, they have shedloads of the stuff.
 
#11
Watching the final scene when the boxhead officer says the war is over, judging by the background November 1918 was in the grip of some freak winter heatwave.
 
#12
All a bit fey. As a bit of a sucker (hur hur) for boobies I have this on. What was the short stabby thing he pulled on the semi-naked brass? Didn't look too like the bayonet of the time.
There was a scene in the previous episode where it showed him with a FOGB sheath knife on the back of his Sam Browne. I did wonder whether WW1 ruperts would have carried cutlery. I'm sure the military adviser knew what he was doing. ;-)

It also seemed there were fluorescent light fittings in the tunnel scene where they had been buried. No candles were seen, maybe they should have done that bit on the radio.
 
#13
Did it show us sappers in a bad light (no pun intended)?
Didn't watch it, and havn't read the book, my missus has done both and says the book is better. Too much love story and not enough tunnelling in the programme.
 
#14
Read the book twice, second time to fully understand it.

Shame about the errors in the filming of the trenches etc, as there is a wealth of knowledge out there in the various WW1 groups which they could have used.

I hope Warhorse is more accurate.
 
#15
Thought it was ok myself. Have,nt read the book but it was alright as far as drama,s go. I also smiled at the rather clement weather conditions for November but then if i wanted a documentary i,d have watched trench detectives.
 
#16
There was a scene in the previous episode where it showed him with a FOGB sheath knife on the back of his Sam Browne. I did wonder whether WW1 ruperts would have carried cutlery. I'm sure the military adviser knew what he was doing. ;-)

It also seemed there were fluorescent light fittings in the tunnel scene where they had been buried. No candles were seen, maybe they should have done that bit on the radio.

Oh, I thought I saw a saw a muzzle ring. Also, I recall the miners writing about the bright reflection from the chalk, Maybe it was phosphorescent too? [wah]
 
#17
Oh, I thought I saw a saw a muzzle ring. Also, I recall the miners writing about the bright reflection from the chalk, Maybe it was phosphorescent too? [wah]
It may have been a bayonet but wasn't as long as the issued one. Would a rupert carry a knife, or a bayonet since he didn't have a rifle?
 

Attachments

#18
I hope Warhorse is more accurate.
Here and now, no it isn't. It's a crap war film, but an ok film about a horse that happens to have war part way in it.

The major battle scene is meant to be the Second Battle of the Somme (1918), but it may as well be Passchendaele 1917. In other words, Spielberg shows what every other WW1 film shows (exception: The Trench). The archetypal battlefield with shell holes filled with water and everyone caked in mud.

The major going over the top scene was fairly good but very Saving Private Ryan-y. Lots of running around and confusion and explosions and people being shot but in a very luke-warm PG-13 way. All Spielberg shows is the stereotype. Everyone running forward, people being mown down; no apparent command after the whistle is blown or apparent tactics. It's a shame because Spielberg had an opportunity to break some of the stereotypes of the war instead of pandering to them.

That said, we didn't see pompous British Officers sending heroic Colonials to their deaths, which was a pleasant break from tradition. And he shows a WW1 tank, which was interesting, as you don't normally see those in films, but the what the tank did in the film made absolutely no sense.

For all the class rubbish, I thought Birdsong was better.
 
#20
Bird song was ok but might need to read the book to get a better look at the story...out of interest where did the title Bird Song come from (what was the meaning??)
 

Latest Threads

New Posts