Bird Flu

#2
Fly to the hills but do NOT cough or sneeze after landing.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#3
I really don't understand the panic. World-wide only about 100 people have died from this (in what...over a year?). I accept that it could mutate into a human-human contaigon, but think on this:

How many people die each year of Malaria, MRSA, AIDS, 'normal' 'flu etc etc etc.... ad infinitum. Bird 'flu is only a tiny blip in any statistcal analysis.

The chances of this being transmitted from bird to human (unless living and working in close proximity all day, every day) are pretty minimal. The odds are much greater that you will get hit by a car on the way to work tomorrow...
 
#4
Legs said:
The chances of this being transmitted from bird to human (unless living and working in close proximity all day, every day) are pretty minimal. The odds are much greater that you will get hit by a car on the way to work tomorrow...
Especially if an infected bird is driving it
 
#5
I have just had a phonecall from a good friend, he was really flapping.

"Mate, mate I think I've got birdflu" he said

I told him to calm down and tell me why he thought that could be the case

"Well", he said, "I'm talking sh*t and I can't park the car!".






I'll get my coat then....
 
#6
Birds are always shite at parallel parking, the lack of coordination, the illogical mind, their t1ts get in the way of the steering wheel and then somebody tries to shove sage and onion up an orifice. That fcuks them up totally.
 
#7
mistersoft said:
Birds are always shite at parallel parking, the lack of coordination, the illogical mind, their t1ts get in the way of the steering wheel and then somebody tries to shove sage and onion up an orifice. That fcuks them up totally.
And that's without the bird flu
 

LARD

War Hero
#8
Quick despatch the Parliamentary Labour Party to throw a cordon round it! They will either contract the disease, or more likely claim responsiblity for saving civilisation!
 
#9
An initial 1.8 mile (3km) protection zone was set up around Cellardyke on Wednesday, surrounded by a six-mile (10km) surveillance zone.
Sorry. Can't help laughing uncontrollably at the BBC news report I heard thismorning.
Road blocks have been set up to intercept any birds in transit.
Have visions of "chicken run" type birds queueing up here...... :D
So, what about the flying illegal immigrant birds that had no wish to stop at the road blocks?? Hmm...... tricky one for the press...... :wink: :wink:
Uncontrolled laughter :lol: :D
 
#10
Who does the ATC for Cellardyke? Hadn't somebody better tell the wild birds they're excluded? Thinking of Cellardyke as a holiday destination, close to the golf, very quiet and just own up to having a chicken salad sandwich and you get your car cleaned for nothing.
 
#11
Legs said:
I really don't understand the panic. World-wide only about 100 people have died from this (in what...over a year?). I accept that it could mutate into a human-human contaigon, but think on this:

How many people die each year of Malaria, MRSA, AIDS, 'normal' 'flu etc etc etc.... ad infinitum. Bird 'flu is only a tiny blip in any statistcal analysis.

The chances of this being transmitted from bird to human (unless living and working in close proximity all day, every day) are pretty minimal. The odds are much greater that you will get hit by a car on the way to work tomorrow...
Yeah but....

Department of Health said:
A severe form of avian influenza or ‘bird flu’ – called H5N1 – has affected poultry flocks and other birds in several countries since 2003. As of 6 April 2006, 192 people have also caught the infection, as a result of close and direct contact with infected birds. One hundred and nine of these have subsequently died.
That looks like a 55% casuality rate to me, I don't think you have a 1:2 chance of being hit by a car.

Department of Health said:
There is no firm evidence that H5N1 has acquired the ability to pass easily from person to person. However, concern remains that the virus might develop this ability, or that it might mix with human flu viruses to create a new virus. It is this ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. This regularly updated feature explains the background to the disease, and assesses the nature of the risk to people living in the UK.
If the Virus were to mutate so it could transmit via airborne particles (i.e. particles of spit ejected when people cough) and its spread go un-checked then an awfull lot of people could die.
 
#12
Bennett said:
Legs said:
I really don't understand the panic. World-wide only about 100 people have died from this (in what...over a year?). I accept that it could mutate into a human-human contaigon, but think on this

How many people die each year of Malaria, MRSA, AIDS, 'normal' 'flu etc etc etc.... ad infinitum. Bird 'flu is only a tiny blip in any statistcal analysis.

The chances of this being transmitted from bird to human (unless living and working in close proximity all day, every day) are pretty minimal. The odds are much greater that you will get hit by a car on the way to work tomorrow...
Yeah but....

Department of Health said:
A severe form of avian influenza or ‘bird flu’ – called H5N1 – has affected poultry flocks and other birds in several countries since 2003. As of 6 April 2006, 192 people have also caught the infection, as a result of close and direct contact with infected birds. One hundred and nine of these have subsequently died.
That looks like a 55% casuality rate to me, I don't think you have a 12 chance of being hit by a car.

Department of Health said:
There is no firm evidence that H5N1 has acquired the ability to pass easily from person to person. However, concern remains that the virus might develop this ability, or that it might mix with human flu viruses to create a new virus. It is this ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. This regularly updated feature explains the background to the disease, and assesses the nature of the risk to people living in the UK.
If the Virus were to mutate so it could transmit via airborne particles (i.e. particles of spit ejected when people cough) and its spread go un-checked then an awfull lot of people could die.
I seem to remember somebody saying IF there were WOMD in Iraq. Nice word IF but too much play on it.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#13
Bennett said:
Legs said:
I really don't understand the panic. World-wide only about 100 people have died from this (in what...over a year?). I accept that it could mutate into a human-human contaigon, but think on this:

How many people die each year of Malaria, MRSA, AIDS, 'normal' 'flu etc etc etc.... ad infinitum. Bird 'flu is only a tiny blip in any statistcal analysis.

The chances of this being transmitted from bird to human (unless living and working in close proximity all day, every day) are pretty minimal. The odds are much greater that you will get hit by a car on the way to work tomorrow...
Yeah but....

Department of Health said:
A severe form of avian influenza or ‘bird flu’ – called H5N1 – has affected poultry flocks and other birds in several countries since 2003. As of 6 April 2006, 192 people have also caught the infection, as a result of close and direct contact with infected birds. One hundred and nine of these have subsequently died.
That looks like a 55% casuality rate to me, I don't think you have a 1:2 chance of being hit by a car.

Department of Health said:
There is no firm evidence that H5N1 has acquired the ability to pass easily from person to person. However, concern remains that the virus might develop this ability, or that it might mix with human flu viruses to create a new virus. It is this ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. This regularly updated feature explains the background to the disease, and assesses the nature of the risk to people living in the UK.
If the Virus were to mutate so it could transmit via airborne particles (i.e. particles of spit ejected when people cough) and its spread go un-checked then an awfull lot of people could die.
My bold. I see your point, but that's 192 people out of how many hundreds of thousands who work constantly with poultry?
 
#14
There's more people that die in Africa due to hippos than lions so what now an exclusion zone round Anne Widdecombe?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
Mistersoft - have you been taking the sarcasm pills again? :wink:
 
#16
Legs said:
Mistersoft - have you been taking the sarcasm pills again? wink
Moi?
 
#17
Bird flu is that just like a really cr*p version of MAN FLU
 
#18
MSI64 said:
Bird flu is that just like a really cr*p version of MAN FLU
Yes, with more headaches and you only catch it at specific times of the month, Compulsive shopping, dancing round handbags and rushing to the toilets in groups are all symptoms.
 
#20
Mistersoft said:
I seem to remember somebody saying IF there were WOMD in Iraq. Nice word IF but too much play on it.
WMD where an excuse to go to war on Iraq, for more info on Iraqs WMD capabilities pre2003 read Mike Smith's book "The Spying Game" it seems Saddams government had a JIT approach to the manufacture of some WMDs.

Legs said:
My bold. I see your point, but that's 192 people out of how many hundreds of thousands who work constantly with poultry?
I'm not being Private Fraser here just stating that once contracted you have a 50:50 chance of survival. And if it were to mutate things could get hairy. When a virus infects the body it creates millions of copies of itself and I suspect that it wouldn’t take an act of God (un-like finding WMDs in Iraq ;)) for a few of them to mutate. We can but hope there is not a major outbreak in Britain.
And if there is we will have to trust the government have plans to control it.

We’re all Doooomed. ;)
 

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